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Journal of Mycology 


VOLUME 12 


JV. A. Kellerman 


COLUMBUS, OHIO 
1906 




13 

Y $ (& 

V, *2- 


DATES OF ISSUE 

Pages I-40 were issued March 8 , 1906 

Pages 41-88 were issued May 31, 1906 

Pages 89-136 were issued June 9, 1906 

Pages 137-184 were issued September 29 , 1906 

Pages 183-232 were issued November 8 , 1906 

Pages 233-278 were issued December 3 , 1906 

For Table of Contents of the several bi-monthly 
parts see pages I, 41 , 89, 137, 183 
and 233 respectively 



Volume I2> No. 81 January 1906 


Journal of Mycology 


TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Morgan — North American Species of Marasmius. 1 

Kellerman — Uredineous Culture Experiments with Puccinia Sor- 


ghi, 1905. 9 

Arthur —Cultures of Uredineae in 1905. 11 

Durand — Peziza fusicarpa Ger. and Peziza semitosta B. & C. 28 

Kellerman — Notes irom Mycological literature XVII. 32 

Editor’s Notes . 40 


IV. A. Kellerman, Ph. D. 

Professor of Botany, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 


Entered as Second Class Matter, Post-office at Columbus, Ohio. 


PRESS OF F. J. HEER, COLUMBUS, OHIO. 






















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Journal of Mycology Portraits with Facsimile Autographs 







Journal of Mycology 

VOLUME 12-JANUARY 1906 


TABLE OF CONTENTS. 

Morgan — North American Species of Marasmius. 1 

Kellerman-; Uredineous Culture Experiments with Puccinia Sor- 

ghi, 1905. 9 

Arthur —Cultures of Uredineae in 1905. . 11 

Durand — Peziza fusicarpa Ger. and Peziza semitosts B. & C. 28 

Kellerman — Notes lrom Mycological literature XVII. 32 

Editor’s Notes. 40 


NORTH AMERICAN SPECIES OF MARASMIUS. 

A. P. MORGAN. 

(Continued from page 247, Vol. 11.) 

124. MARASMIUS CHRYSOCHAETES B. & C. Fungi 
Cub. 120. 

Pileus white, convex, silicate, umbilicate, depressed around 
the umbo. Stipe slender, elongated, glabrous, tawny, insititious. 
Lamellae few, white, rather broad, collariate. 

Growing on dead leaves. Pileus 2 mm. in diameter, the 
stipe 2-3 cm. in length. 

125. MARASMIUS GRAMINUM B. & Br. Berkley’s 
Outlines, i860. Agaricus graminum Libert, PI. Crypt. 1837. 

Pileus membranaceous, convex then plane, umbonate, sul- 
cate, very pale rufous. Stipe capillary, glabrous, shining, black, 
pale at the apex. Lamellae adnate to a free collar, equal, few 
and very distant (6-8), whitish; spores ovoid, 5-6 mic. 

Growing on withered leaves of grasses. Pileus 4-6 mm. in 
diameter, the stipe 2-5 cm. long. 

126. MARASMIUS CURREYI B. &. Br. Ann. & Mag. 
N. H. 

Pileus nearly plane, sulcate, pale rufous, the grooves paler, 
the umbo tawny. Stipe quite smooth, shining, black, white at 
the apex. Lamellae few, cream-colored, attached to a collar 
round the stipe; spores ovoid-oblong, 9-11 x 5-6 mic. 

Growing on leaves of grass. Pileus 6-10 mm. in diameter, 
the stipe 2-3 cm. long. 

B. STIPE VELVETY OR PRUINATE. 











2 


[Vol. 12 


Journal of Mycology 
a. Pileus Colored. 

127. MARASMIUS ATRO-RUBENS Berk. Journ. Bot. 
1842. 

Pileus membranaceous, convex, regularly radiate-venose, 
dark reddish. Stipe very slender, umber, velvety. Lamellae 
rather close, cultrate, pallid. 

Growing on old leaves and dead trunks in woods. Pileus 
9-10 mm. in diameter. 

128. MARASMIUS THUJINUS Peck, N. Y. Rep. 1902. 

Pileus membranaceous, hemispheric or convex, often slightly 

umbilicate, minutely pulverulent-tomentose, distantly striate on 
the margin, cinereous tinged with lilac. Stipe capillary, glabrous 
or with a few minute scattered flocci, pallid, sometimes brownish 
toward the base. Lamellae few, distant, adnate, white. 

Growing on fallen leaves of Thuja. Pileus 2-3 mm. in diam¬ 
eter, the stipe 1-2 cm. long, scarcely thicker than a hair. 

129. MARASMIUS FELIX Morgan, sp. nov. 

Pileus membranaceous, convex then explanate, glabrous, 
faintly plicate-rugulose, rufescent. Stipe more or less elongated, 
capillary, minutely pubescent, brown or blackish, white at the 
apex, the base insititious. Lamellae unequal, some of them 
forked, rather narrow, distant, adnate, white; spores ovoid- 
oblong, apiculate, 7-9 x 3-4 mic. 

Growing on old leaves of Platanus, insititious on the petioles 
and veins. Preston, O. Pileus 2-6 mm. in diameter, the stipe 
varying in length from 2-8 cm. Pileus pale rufous or nearly 
white to testaceous, becoming more saturated with the color in 
drying. A near relative of M. epiphyllus. Pers. 

b. Pileus white or whitish, 
a'. Pileus Plicate — Sulcate. 

130. MARASMIUS INSITITIOUS Fries. Hym. Eur. 

Pileus membranaceous, tough, convexo-plane, subumbilicate, 

at length plicate-sulcate and whitish. Stipe horny, fistulous, 
floccose-furfuraceous, reddish-brown, tapering downward to the 
simple, insititious base. Lamellae broadly adnate, unequal, 
simple, distant, becoming white; spores elliptic-ovoid, 4 x 
2.5 mic. 

Growing on fallen leaves of oak, etc. Pileus 5-10 mm. in 
diameter, the stipe 2-3 cm. in length. 

131. MARASMIUS SACCHARINUS Fries. Hym. Eur. 
Agaricus saccharinus Batsch El. Fung. 1784. 

Pileus membranaceous, convex, somewhat papillate, gla¬ 
brous, sulcate and plicate, white. Stipe very slender, flocculose, 
glabrate, obliquely insititious, reddish. Lamellae broadly adnate, 
narrow, thick, very distant, reticulate-con joined, whitish ; spores 
elliptic, 5x3 mic. 


Jan. 1906] North America?i Species of Marasmius 


3 


Growing on leaves, twigs, etc. Pileus 2-4 mm. in diameter, 
the stipe 1.5-2.5 cm. long. 

b'. Pileus Even or Only Rugulose. 

132. MARASMIUS PERFORANS Fries. Hym. Eur. 
Agaricus perforans Hoffman, Norn. Fung. 1789. 

Ill-smelling. Pileus submembranaceous, rather plane, with¬ 
out striae, rugulose, glabrous, whitish. Stipe fistulous, equal, 
velvety, bay-black, the base insititious. Lamellae adnate, simple, 
rather close, whitish, most of them dimidiate; spores elliptic- 
ovoid, 5-6 x 2-3 mic. 

Growing on leaves of Abies. Pileus 6-10 mm. in diameter, 
the stipe 2-4 cm. long. 

133. MARASMIUS EPIPHYLLUS Fries. Hym. Eur. 
Agaricus epiphyllus Persoon, Synopsis. 1801. 

Pileus membranaceous, rather plane, at length umbilicate, 
glabrous, plicate-rugose, milk-white. Stipe horny, fistulous,' 
slightly velvety, brown below, insititious. Lamellae adnate, few 
and distant, entire venose, white; spores oblong, 6-7 x 2 mic. 

Growing on the petioles and veins of old leaves. Pileus 5-10 
mm. in diameter, the stipe 3-5 cm. long. 

134. MARASMIUS MINUTISSIMUS Peck, 27 N. Y. 
Rep. 1874. 

Very small, the whole surface invested with a minute glandu¬ 
lar pubescence. Pileus membranaceous, convex then explanate, 
faintly rugulose, whitish. Stipe filiform, brown below, fading 
gradually to white at the apex, the base insititious. Lamellae 
few and distant (4-10), white, narrow, adnate, sometimes vein¬ 
like and imperfect; spores lance-oblong, 7-10 x 3-4 mic. 

Growing on old leaves along the borders of fields next to 
woods. Pileus 2-5 mm. in diameter, the stipe 6-16 mm. long. 
The glandular hairs are longest on the lower part of the stipe, 
becoming smaller upward and on the pileus and most minute on 
the lamellae. Peck’s description is of the smallest plants. 

§2. OMPHALIA. PILEUS SUBMEMBRANACEOUS; 
THE STIPE CENTRAL, CARTILAGINOUS, FISTULOSE, 
SOMEWHAT THICKENED UPWARD ; THE LAMEL¬ 
LAE TRULY DECURRENT. 

I. CYATHIFORMES. Pileus submembranaceous, at 
length depressed, umbilicate or even infundibuliform. 

A. STIPE GLABROUS. 

135. MARASMIUS VAILLANTII Fries, Hym. Eur. 
Fungus pileo candicante, etc. Vaillant, Bot. Paris, 1727. Aga¬ 
ricus Vaillantii Persoon Synopsis. 1801. 


4 


Journal of Mycology 


[Vol. 12 


Pileus submembranaceous, tough, soon explanate, depressed, 
plicate-rugose, whitish. Stipe stuffed, glabrous, brown, the apex 
thickened and paler. Lamellae broad, subdecurrent, thick, dis¬ 
tant, white; spores elliptic, 10x6 mic. 

Growing on old wood, fallen twigs, leaves, etc. Pileus 1-2 
cm. in diameter, the stipe about 2.5 cm. long. 

136. MARASMIUS LANGUIDUS Fries Hym. Eur. 
Agaricus languidus Lasch. Linnaea, No. 157. 

Pileus a little fleshy, convex, gibbous or umbilicate, floccu- 
lose, rugose-sulcate, yellowish and flesh-color, becoming whitish. 
Stipe stuffed, thickened above, naked and pallid, below brown or 
blackish and sometimes villose thickened at the base. Lamellae 
adnate becoming decurrent, distant, narrow, venose-connected; 
spores 6-7x4 mic. 

Growing on twigs, herbaceous stems, etc. Pileus 10-15 mm. 
in diameter, the stipe about 2.5 cm. long. 

137. MARASMIUS HYPERELLUS Fries, Nov. Symb. 

1857- 

Pileus very thin, membranaceous, explanate, umbilicate, 
lineate-triate, rugulose when dry, whitish. Stipe filiform, fis- 
tulose, glabrous, brown or blackish, encircled by an orbicular 
base. Lamellae subdecurrent, distant, thin, whitish. 

Growing on sticks. Pileus 10-12 mm. in diameter, the stipe 
3.5-4 cm. long. 

138. MARASMIUS VIRIDI-FUSCUS B. & C. Fungi 
Cub. 103. 

Pileus thin, explanate, radiate-striate, pale green. Stipe 
slender, glabrous, thickened upward, brown or blackish below. 
Lamellae broad, distant, decurrent, green. 

Growing on dead sticks. Pileus 10-12 mm. in diameter, the 
stipe 12 mm. long. 

139. MARASMIUS CYATHIFORMIS B. & C. Fungi 
Cub. 104. 

Caespitose. Pileus cyathiform, glabrous, brown when dry. 
Stipe dilated upward. Lamellae distant, decurrent. 

Growing on dead wood. Pileus 2-2.5 cm * i n diameter, the 
stipe 2-3 cm. long and 1 mm. thick. 

140. MARASMIUS PURPURASCENS B. & C. Fungi 
Cub. 105. 

Pileus thin, infundibuliform, minutely tomentose, striatulate, 
pale purple, when dry whitish. Stipe glabrous, concolorous. 
Lamellae close, narrow, decurrent, concolorous. 

Growing on sticks in shady woods. Pileus 2 cm. in diam¬ 
eter, the stipe 2-3 cm. long. 

B. STIPE VELVETY OR PRUINATE. 


Jan. 1906 ] North American Species of Marasmius 


5 


141. MARASMIUS LEUCOCEPHALUS Mont. Syll. 
Crypt. 1856. 

Pileus membranaceous, convex then plane and depressed, at 
length infundibuliform, glabrous, white. Stipe cartilaginous, 
stuffed then hollow, pallid above, brownish below, villous- 
pruinose with pale tawny flocci, attached by a discoid base. 
Lamellae unequal, white, narrow in front and obtuse, broader 
behind, sinuate-adnate and long decurrent. 

Growing on fallen sticks. Pileus 6-15 mm. in diameter, the 
stipe 2-3 cm. long. 

142. MARASMIUS SEMISPARSUS Berkeley, Chall. 
Exp. 1875. 

Pileus depressed, umber, gray-pulverulent, the margin naked 
and sulcate. Stipe umber, minutely tomentose, the base some¬ 
what spongy. Lamellae distant, adnate-decurrent, concolorous. 

Growing on the petiole of a dead leaf; Bermuda. Pileus 
about 4 mm. in diameter, the stipe 12 mm. long, twisted and 
compressed when dry. 

143. MARASMIUS TOMENTOSIPES Peck, Bull. 
Torr. 1902. 

Pileus thin, convex, afterward nearly plane, usually umbili- 
cate, glabrous, the margin striate, yellow-brown or ferruginous, 
brown when dry. Stipe slender, hard, elastic, hollow, brown or 
black, tomentose. Lamellae narrow, rather distant, unequal, 
arcuate-decurrent, pale-yellow; spores elliptic, 6 - 7 X 3-4 mic. 

Growing in coniferous woods; Idaho. Pileus 1-3.5 cm. m 
diameter, the stipe 2-4 cm. long and 1 mm. thick. 

II. CLAVIFORMES. Pileus membranaceous , campanu- 
late or convex , never depressed . 

A. STIPE GLABROUS. 

144. MARASMIUS ALBO-FUSCUS B. & C. Fungi 
Cub. ioi. 

Pileus plane, umbonate, thin, striate, reticulate, white, the 
center brown. Stipe solid, glabrous, slender, slightly thickened 
above. Lamellae few, distant, broad, adnate-decurrent, the inter¬ 
stices trabeculate. 

Growing on logs in woods. Pileus 12 mm. in diameter, the 
stipe 2-3 cm. long. 

145. MARASMIUS ALBICEPS Peck, 43 N. Y. Rep. 
1889. 

Pileus membranaceous, either convex or campanulate, gla¬ 
brous, white. Stipe corneous, setiform, glabrous, black, paler 
at the apex, attached to the matrix by radiating brown hairs or 
fibers. Lamellae broad, distant, adnate- or arcuate-decurrent, 
white; spores obovoid or subelliptic, 6-8X3-4 mic. usually con¬ 
taining a shining guttule. 



6 Journal of Mycology [Vol. 12 

Growing among fallen leaves in woods. Pileus about 
4 mm. in diameter, the stipe 2-3 cm. long. 

B. STIPE VELVETY OR P RUIN ATE. 

146. MARASMIUS CLAVAEFORMIS Berkeley, LeTs 
Cat. 1849. 

Pileus convex, tough, white. Stipe slender, tapering down¬ 
ward and attached by a minute bulb, brown below, and clothed 
with a depressed velvety pubescence, thickened above and white 
sprinkled with furfuraceous particles. Lamellae distant, broad 
in front, behind long decurrent, whitish inclining to flesh-color. 

Growing on dead sticks. Pileus 4 mm. in diameter, the stipe 
2.5 cm. long. 

147. MARASMIUS DECURRENS Peck, 24 N. Y. Rep. 
1871. Marasmius resinosus Saccardo. Sylloge V. 

Pileus thin, convex, minutely tomentose, grayish or tawny. 
Stipe slender, firm, equal, gray, minutely tomentose. Lamellae 
arcuate-decurrent, subdistant, narrow, tapering toward each end, 
whitish with discolored edge, interspaces rugose-reticulated. 

Growing on the ground in a shaded ravine. Pileus 8-12 mm. 
in diameter, the stipe 3-5 cm. long and 1 mm. thick. 

148. MARASMIUS ACULEATUS Patonillard, Bull. 
Soc. Myc. 1900. 

Pileus convexo-campanulate, thin, coriaceous, semipellucid, 
densely orchaceous-tomentose; the hairs straight, convergent- 
fasciculate, thus forming stellate warts. Stipe slender, tapering 
upward, clothed with a short, velvety, ochraceous tomentum. 
Lamellae few, distant, broadly adnate, subdecurrent. 

Growing on the ground; Guadaloup. Pileus 2 cm. in diam¬ 
eter, the stipe 2 cm. long. The pileus bristles with warts like 
those of a Lycoperdon. 

§ 4. PLEUROTUS. PILEUS MORE OR LESS IR¬ 
REGULAR; THE STIPE EX CENTRIC, LATERAL OR 
WANTING. COMMONLY GROWING ON WOOD. 

A. STIPE EXCENTRIC. 

a. Lamellae colored. 

149. MARASMIUS PURPUREUS B. & C. Fungi Cub. 

No. 135. 1867. 

Pileus convex then plane, thin, sulcate, tomentose, purple. 
Stipe excentric, very short, solid, thickened upward, whitish. La¬ 
mellae broad, distant, purple, adnexed, the interstices even. 

Growing on stumps in woods. Pileus 2 cm. in diameter, the 
stipe 2-4 mm. long. 


Jan. 1906 ] North American Species of Marasmius 


7 


150. MARASMIUS CORACIPES B. & C. Fung| 
Cub. 93. 

Pileus convex, thin, even, pale brown. Stipe subexcentric, 
concolorous with the pileus, rather thick, sulcate, glabrous. La¬ 
mellae close, narrow, unequal, adnexed, pale rufous. 

Growing in woods. Pileus 12-15 mm - * n diameter, the stipe 
3.5-4 cm. long. 

151. MARASMIUS OBLIQUUS B. & C. Fungi Cub. 

136. 

Pileus flabelliform, glabrous, polished, the margin involute. 
Stipe oblique, very short, cylindric. Lamellae distant, adnate- 
decurrent, brown when dry. 

Growing on dead wood in ravines. Pileus 2 cm. in diameter, 
the stipe 2 mm. long. 

b. Lamellae white, 

152. MARASMIUS CAESPITOSUS Peck, 26 N. Y. 
Rep. 1873. 

Pileus fleshy, convex, even, brown with a lilac tint, sometimes 
irregular. Stipe central or excentric, stuffed or hollow, pruinose. 
Lamellae close, free, somewhat united with each other at the 
stipe, narrowed outwardly, white. 

Growing caespitosely on birch wood. Pileus 1-2 cm. in diam¬ 
eter, the stipe 3-5 cm. long. 

153. MARASMIUS SEMIUSTIS B. & C. Fungi Cub. 

102. 

White, rufus when dried. Pileus excentric, convex then 
plane, rugose or sulcate, glabrous. Stipe short, compressed, gla¬ 
brous. Lamellae distant, reaching the stipe, the spaces between 
rugose. 

Growing on rotten wood. Pileus 8-12 mm. in diameter, the 
stipe 6-7 mm. long. 

B. STIPE LATERAL AND VERY SHORT, 
a. Lamellae colored. 

154. MARASMIUS CURTISII Sacc. n Syd. Sylloge 
XIV. Marasmius haematodes B. & C. Fungi Cub. 139. 

Pileus helmet-shaped, rigid, glabrous, deep red-brown. Stipe 
none. Lamellae venose, thick, concolorous. 

Growing on dead sticks. Pileus 2 mm. in breadth. 

155. MARASMIUS CONCOLOR B. & C. Fungi Cub. 

138. 

Pileus helmet-shaped, irregular, lobed, dull tawny, pulver¬ 
ulent. Stipe none. Lamellae broad, concolorous. 

Growing on sticks in woods. Pileus 2-4 mm. in breadth. 


8 


Journal of Mycology [Vol. 12 

156. MARASMIUS SABALI Berkeley, Chall. Exp. II. 
1878. 

Pileus reniform, tomentose, at length resupinate and culcate. 
Stipe very short. Lamellae thick, entire, rounded behind, dis¬ 
tant, adnate; spores subglobose, 8 mic. in diameter. 

Growing on petioles of Sabal Palmetto; Bermuda. The 
whole plant reddish when dry. 

157. MARASMIUS ASPERIFOLIUS Patonillard, 
Jour. Bot. 1889. 

Pileus sessile, resupinate or reflexed, glabrous, striate, pale 
brown. Lamellae distant, concolorous or paler, unequal, hirsute, 
attached to a hairy stipitiform tubercle, cvstidia numerous, cla- 
vate, prominent. 

Growing on bark of Murraya; Martinique. 

158. MARASMIUS CALOSPORUS Pat. in D uss. En. 

1903- 

Pileus sessile, resupinate, at first pezizoid, then split and 
almost dimidiate, very thin, membranaceous, white, glabrescent. 
Lamellae few, white-yellowish, distant', radiating from an ex- 
centric point; spores ovoid, smooth, 10x7 mic. 

Growing in clusters on rotten branchlets of Clibadium, Guad- 
aloupe. Pileus minute, scarcely 2 mm. in breadth. 

b. Lamellae white or pallid. 

159. MARASMIUS MERULINUS B. & C. Fungi Cub. 
133. A . (Collybia) Merulius Bertero ms. in Montagne, 
Flora Fernand. 1835. 

“Lamellae in the center, agaricine, at the margin meruline.” 
Montagne. It is said to differ from M. spaniophyllus by its white 
pileus. 

Growing on sticks in woods; “Alabama.'’ Berk. 

160. MARASMIUS ARACHNOIDEUS B. & C. Fungi 
Cub. 137. 

All white. Pileus resupinate, adnate, the stipe very short, 
at length obliterated, arising from an arachnoid mycelium. La¬ 
mellae few. 

Growing on dead wood. Pileus 2 mm. in breadth. 

161. MARASMIUS NIDULUS B. & C. Fungi Cub. 

: 34 - 

Pileus resupinate, at first pezizaeform, at length free on one 
side, pruinose-floccose, white. Stipe very short, pruinose. La¬ 
mellae few, thick, ventricose. 

Growing on sticks in woods. Pileus 2-6 mm. in breadth. 

162. MARASMIUS HAWAIENSIS P. Hennings, Mon- 

SUNIA I. 1899. 





Jan. 190(3] Uredmeous Culture Experiments , Etc. 


9 


Pileus membranaceous, tough, sessile, reniform or subflabel- 
late, yellow-brown, subrugulose, the margin entire or incised. 
Lamellae radiating behind, rather broad, few, branched, reticulate, 
anastomosing, pallid. 

Growing on trunks covered with mosses; Hawaia. Pileus 
1-3 cm. broad, 1.5-2 cm. long. • 


UREDINEOUS CULTURE EXPERIMENTS WITH PUC- 

CINIA SORGHI, 190S. 1 

W. A. KELLERMAN. 

For three seasons previous, reports of infection experiments 
have been made dealing with quite a number of Rust species. 
This fourth report is, unfortunately, extremely brief; due to the 
fact that a Winter mycological collecting trip was made to Guat¬ 
emala that lasted into Spring. Also other work that had been in 
the meantime neglected, demanded much time and, besides, class 
duties in college were pressing. Consequently nothing was car¬ 
ried to completion this season except the Maize Rust experiments 
which can be outlined in a few sentences. 

First let me recur to the completed work with this species one 
year ago. At that time I secured what was taken to be infection 
of Maize plants direct with teleutospores (but below will be 
differently interpreted) ; and thereafter extended inoculation work 
was carried on with the uredospores so secured. 

SUMMARY OF PREVIOUS WORK. 

No inoculations with Maize Rust were on record previous to 
1904. Work for that season was published in the Journal of 
Mycology, 11:26-33, Jan. IQ05, and the point settled beyond 
possible doubt were these: That, using uredospores, the species 
was readily transferred to any and all the “agricultural species” 
of Maize; that teosinte ( Euchlaena luxurious) was also a host 
for this species of Rust (not before reported) ; that attempts to 
inoculate Sorghum vulgare, Saccharum othcinarum, and Trip- 
sicum dactyloides were unfruitful. 

AN AECIDIUM NOT DETECTED. 

In the progress of the work no Aecidium was encountered, 
though spores were taken from teleutosporic pustules that had 
been exposed all winter (on sweet corn), and with sowings 

1 Contributions from the Botanical Laboratory of the Ohio State 
University, XXIII. 




10 


Journal of Mycology 


[Vol. 12 


therefrom uredospores were obtained also later teleutospores. 
The pustules were cursorily examined before used and nothing 
was observed but teleutospores. 

dr. Arthur's discovery of the aecidium. 

Before my work was published Dr. Arthur had the rare 
good fortune to demonstrate the aecidium stage of the Maize 
Rust. Twice I had, as I supposed, obtained uredospores by using 
teleutospores direct on Maize plants — and scant material yet 
remaining enabled me to get a third inoculation with spores from 
my teleutosporic pustules. As far as seemed consistent with prob¬ 
able success in this third attempt at inoculation the pustules were 
disintegrated and the mass of spores (with loss of course) was 
subjected to microscopic scrutiny; but no uredospores were seen. 
Doubtless further search should have been made — uredospores 
might have been found, and that, of course, would have been of 
far greater value than the successful inoculation. Dr. Arthur 
used aecidiospores of Oxalis to inoculate Maize. The final link 
in the absolutely complete demonstration was this only — to use 
teleutospores of Maize rust to secure the aecidium on Oxalis. 
This I did. 

WORK WITH THE TELEUTOSPORES IN I905. 

The chain of evidence was in fact complete — or at least 
neither Dr. Arthur nor myself longer could doubt that the life 
cycle of this Rust included three stages — aecidium, uredo and 
teleuto. Confidently therefore on my return from Guatemala I 
instituted experiments in the month of April and early in May, 
using teleutospores from sweet corn that had been exposed all 
winter. In due time the several Oxalis plants on which sowings 
were made responded generously and repetitions were equally 
satisfactory. 

REPETITION OF FORMER WORK. 

The theory I proposed one year ago, namely, that an aecidium 
might be suppressed at will (or under circumstances), I now 
abandon. It is very probable that a few uredospores viable were 
harbored by the teleutosporic pustules and these in that case of 
course gave the inoculation of the Maize. Uredosporic inocu¬ 
lation as shown by numerous experiments later was not difficult, 
but a very certain result to be anticipated whenever spores fell, 
or were placed, on the proper host. 

SIGNIFICANCE OF THE PHENOMENA OF UREDOSPORIC INOCULATION. 

The surprise that the rather rare aecidium of Oxalis should 
belong to the very common and very abundant Rust of Maize 
was shared by many mycologists. But the reinterpretation of 
my work — which does not seem irrational — clears up the mat- 


Jan. 190 b] 


Cultures of Uredineae in 1905 


11 


ter. Doubtless then the Rust of Maize is carried over from year 
to year in part by means of surviving uredospores. Finally, it 
may be said that while this interpretation was, of course, not 
unthought of by uredinists, I preferred myself to record the final 
judgment only after further work had been carried on in my own 
experimental laboratory. Therefore this is the conclusion of the 
whole matter. 


CULTURES OF UREDINEAE IN 1905. 1 

BY J. C. ARTHUR. 

The present article forms the sixth of a series of reports 2 
by the author upon the culture of plant rusts. They cover the 
years from 1899 to the present year, inclusive. In these studies 
the grass and sedge rusts hold a prominent place, but other hete- 
roecious and autoecious species have been included, and during 
the present season the work has been extended to the so-called 
opis, micro and lepto forms, and also to species with amphi- 
spores. 

The cooperative agreement between the Bureau of Plant 
Industry of the U. S. Department of Agriculture and the Indiana 
Experiment Station, which existed for carrying on the culture 
work in the spring of 1904, was again established, extending 
from July, 1904, to April 30, 1905, making it possible to have 
an assistant during this period, who devoted nearly his whole 
time to the study of the rusts. The position was first held by 
Mr. J. C. Marquis, who was succeeded on October 1, 1905, by 
Mr. Frank D. Kern, and after the expiration of the cooperative 
agreement Mr. Kern was retained by the Experiment Station to 
continue the work. After May 10 all the work fell upon Mr. 
Kern until September, covering the most important part of the 
culture period, the author being absent in Europe. It could not, 
however, have been entrusted to better hands, as the fine ability 
displayed in the work during the previous season, coupled with 
considerable experience already acquired, enabled him to meet 
the new conditions as they arose, and the judgment and caution 
indispensable in securing authoritative results. 

Much of the completeness of the work is due to the kindly 
assistance of correspondents, who have sent teleutosporic mate¬ 
rial, and especially to Messrs. E. Bethel, Denver, Colo.; J. M. 
Bates, Red Cloud, Neb.; A. O. Garrett, Salt Lake City, Utah; 

1 Read before the Botanical Society of America at the New Orleans 
meeting, January 1, 1906. 

2 See Bot. Gaz. 29 : 268-276: Jour. Mycol. 5:51-56; Bot. Gaz. 35 : 
10-23; Jour. Mycol. 10 : 8-21 and 11 : 50-67. 




12 


Journal of Mycology 


[Vol. 12 


J. J. Davis, Racine, Wis.; E. Bartholomew, Rockport, Kansas; 
H. H. Whetzel and H. S. Jackson, Ithaca, N. Y.; C. L. Shear 
and P. L. Ricker, Washington, D. C.; Wm. J. Horne, Santiago 
de las Vegas, Cuba; Jos. J. Wolfe, Durham, N. C.; Lewis Kauf¬ 
man, Morrison, Iowa; R. D. Echlin, Washington, Iowa; R. E. 
Buchanan, Ames, Iowa; H. L. Bolley, Fargo, N. D.; and H. L. 
Shantz, Lincoln, Neb.; to whom my warmest thanks are ex¬ 
tended. I am also much indebted to Messrs. Bethel and Garrett 
for rooted wild plants on which to make sowings, and to Dr. 
Davis for field observations and the suggestion which led to 
successful sowings of Puccinia Eleocharidis. 

During the present season 85 collections of material with 
resting spores and 15 collections with active spores were em¬ 
ployed, from which 484 drop cultures and 13 Petri dish cultures 
were made to test the germinating condition of the spores, these 
being made almost wholly from the resting spores. Out of the 
85 collections with resting spores 32 could not be made to germ¬ 
inate, although every condition seemed favorable, and were there¬ 
fore useless. There were in all 194 sowings of spores made, rep¬ 
resenting 45 species of rusts, and for this purpose 100 species 
of hosts were utilized, which were grown temporarily in pots in 
the greenhouse. 


A few cultures were made with heteroecious species for 
which no clue to the alternate host had been obtained, and with 
one exception the results were negative. These negative trials 
are here recorded to serve for reference. 

1. Puccinia on Car ex Pennsylvanica, sent by Rev. J. M. 
Bates from Red Cloud, Neb., was sown on Urtica gracilis with 
no infection. Similar Material in former seasons has been tried 
on twenty-one other species of hosts with negative results. 3 

2. Puccinia emaculata Schw. on Panicum capillare L. 
from Lafayette, Ind., was sown on Ambrosia artemisiae folia, 
Rudbeckia triloba, R. laciniata and Steironema ciliatum, with no 
infection. This very common and distinctive rust was sown in 
former seasons on fourteen other species of hosts with negative 
results. 4 

3. Puccinia tosta Arth., on Sporobolus asperifolius, sent 
from Denver, Colo., by Mr. E. Bethel, was sown on Napaea 
dioica Symphoricarpos racemosus, Xanthoxylum Americanum, 
Aesculus glabra and Viola papilionacea, with no infection. Sow¬ 
ings of what is taken to be the same species of rust, but on 


3 See Jour. Mycol. 10 : 10. 1904; and rr: 51. 1905. 

4 See Jour. Mycol. 5:52. 1902; Bot. Gaz. 55:12. 1903; and Jour. 
Mycol. 10 : 10. 1904. 






Jan. 1906 ] Cultures of Uredineae in fpojy 


13 


another host, were made in 1903 on six other species of hosts 
with negative results. 5 

4. Puccinia Crandallii Pamm. •& Hume, on Festuca 
condnis, sent from Boulder, Colo., by Mr. E. Bethel, was sown 
on Dodecatheon Meadia, Hydrophyllum appendiculatum, Aqui- 
legia Canadensis, Anemone Canadensis, Thalictrum dioicum, 
Rudbeckia triloba, Gutierrezia Sarothrae, and Lonicera Japonica, 
with no infection. 

5. Uromyces graminicola Burr, on Panicum virgatum, 
sent from Red Cloud, Neb., by Rev. Bates, was sown on Pso- 
ralea Onobrychis, with no infection; while similar material sent 
by Mr. Bartholomew from Stockton, Kans., was sown on the 
same host and also on Cassia Chamaecrista, Polemonium reptans 
and Rudbeckia laciniata, all with no infection. 

6. Uromyces Junci (Schw.) Tul. on Junicus effusus, sent 
by Mr. Jackson from Ithaca, N. Y., was sown on Rudbeckia 
laciniata, R. triloba, and Falcata comosa, with no infection. 
What is believed to be the same species of rust, but on another 
host, was sown in 1902 on a species of Iris with negative results. 


The following species of rusts were successfully grown, and 
the data supplement that obtained from previous cultures of this 
series, or that published by other investigators obtained by means 
of similar cultures. The results in connection with Puccinia 
Pruni-spinosae, the plum rust, are especially interesting, being 
the first studies of the kind with American material. 

1. Melampsora Medusae Thuem.— Teleutosporic mate¬ 
rial obtained near Lafayette, Ind., on Populus deltoides was sown 
April 17 on Larix laricina and L. decidua, which resulted in 
abundance of spermogonia appearing April 25, and a greater 
abundance of aecidia May 1, upon both hosts. 6 

2. Gym NOSPORANGIUM JUNIPERI-VIRGINIANAE Schw. 

Three samples of teleutosporic material were used, one from the 
eastern states, and two from the central west. The test was 
designed to show whether any difference existed between the 
two regions in the power of the species to infect the cultivated 
apple; the apple orchards of Iowa and the central west generally 
being well known to be especially free from this rust. All the 
teleutosporic material was on Juniperus Virginiana, and to all 
appearances equally good. That sent from Durham, N. C., by 
Mr. Wolfe, was sown on a seedling apple out of doors April 27, 
and showed abundant spermogonia May 9, but did not develop 


5 See Jour. Myc. 10 : 10. 1904. 

“See Jour. Mycol. 10 : 13. 1904; and 11 : 52. 1905. 




14 


Journal oj Mycology 


[Vol. 12 


aecidia, although conditions appeared favorable. Material from 
Washington, Iowa, sent by Rev. Echlin, was sown April 22, on 
a small plant of the York Imperial apple in the greenhouse, and 
showed abundant spermogonia on May 5; another sowing was 
made out of doors on a seedling apple April 27, and showed 
spermogonia on May 13, but further observation was prevented 
by insect depredation. A second lot of material was received 
from Ames, Iowa, sent by Mr. Buchanan, and was sown out of 
doors on seedling apple and Crataegus coccinea, and in the 
greenhouse on Amelanchier Botryapium. The sowing on apple 
gave abundant spermogonia, but failed to make further develop¬ 
ment, while on the other hosts there was no infection. So far as 
these tests go there appears to be no difference between the east¬ 
ern and western forms of the species in their power to infect the 
cultivated apple. Many cultures have been made showing the 
full life cycle of this rust (often called G. macropus) . A good 
summary of the subject, especially in reference to the question 
underlying the present work, was given a short time ago by 
Professor Pammel 7 of the Iowa State College. 

3. Puccinia Sambuci (Schw.) Arth. — Teleutosporic 
material of fine quality on Carex lupulina, collected in Noble 
county, near Beavor Dam, Ind., was sent by Mr. Whetzel. It 
was sown on Sambucus Canadensis May 8, giving rise to abun¬ 
dant spermogonia May 14, and aecidia May 25. 

4. Puccinia albiperidia Arth. — Teleutosporic material 
was gathered near Lafayette, Ind., on Carex tetanic a, and sown 
April 7 on Silphium perfoliatum, Polemonium reptans, Ambrosia 
trifida, Rudbeckia laciniata, Steironema ciliatum, and Ribes gra- 
cile. Only the last host showed infection, giving abundant sper¬ 
mogonia April 14, and aecidia April 27, the others remained 
entirely free from rust. 

A part of the teleutosporic material was sent to Dr. H. Kle- 
bahn, Hamburg, Germany, who sowed it on Ribes Uva-crispa, 
R. aureum and R. rubrum. No infection resulted on R. rubrum, 
but on R. Uva-crispa spermogonia showed May 8, and on R. 
aureum May 15. The further development, however, was slow, 
soon coming to naught in the first case, and persisting much 
longer, but with little advance in the second case. Dr. Klebahn 
in commenting upon his results says that the imperfect develop¬ 
ment of the infection on R. uva-crispa may be ascribed, in part 
at least, to the late sowing, for the teleutospores germinated 
freely. The host plants had already passed the most active period 
of growth, and the weather was too warm. His results are 
exactly in accord with our own under similar conditions. The 


7 Bull. Iowa Exper. Sta., No. 84:16-24. August, 1905. 




Jan. 1906 ] 


Cultures of Uredineae in 1905 


15 


failure to secure good aecidia made it impossible to give an 
opinion on the identity of this species of rust, 8 as compared with 
European forms. 

5. Puccinia Caricis-Solidaginis Arth. — Teleutospores 
on Carex sparganioides gathered near Lafayette, Ind., were sown 
April 22 on Aster paniciilatus and again on May 11 on A. panicu- 
latus, A. Drummondii, Ribes rotundifolium , Urtica gracilis, and 
Solidago Canadensis. No infection occurred except on the last 
host, this giving spermogonia May 18 and aecidia May 28 in 
very great abundance. In 1902 cultures of this species were 
made with teleutospores taken from Carex Jamesii and C. stipata. 9 

6. Puccinia Peckii (DeT.) Kellerm. — Teleutosporic 
material on Carex lanuginosa , gathered at Red Cloud, Neb., by 
Rev. Bates, was sown May 19 on Hydrophyllum appendiculatum, 
Steironema ciliatum, and Onagra biennis . On May 26 spermo¬ 
gonia, and May 31 aecidia appeared on O. biennis, the other hosts 
remaining entirely unaffected. This result is a duplicate of that 
obtained in 1904. 10 . 

7. Puccinia Caricis (Schum.) Reb. — Teleutosporic ma¬ 
terial on Carex stipata, gathered near Lafayette, Ind., was sown 
April 18 on Urtica gracilis, and gave spermogonia April 24, and 
aecidia May 1, in great abundance. 

A collection in excellent condition made at Denver, Colo., 
by Mr. Bethel, on Carex aquatilis, was sown on Urtica gracilis 
April 10, giving few but well developed spermogonia April 18, 
and numerous aecidia April 29. It was sown again April 25, 
and gave abundant spermogonia May 1, followed with very 
numerous aecidia May 8. 

Both of these sowings were tried on the evidence of the 
microscopic examination of the collections. It was found that 
the medium-sized teleutospores, and large uredospores found 
intermixed, agreed with those known to belong to this species, 
and the results confirmed the diagnosis. Both collections give 
new hosts for the species. * 11 More interesting still was the 
presence in the Colorado collection of abundant amphispores, 
which agree in every particular with those collected on Carex 
strict a by C. H. Peck in New York, distributed in Thuemen’s 
Myc. Univ., No. 746, and first called Uromyces Caricis Pk., then 
Puccinia Caricis-strictae Diet. This fortunate collection enables 
us to show beyond a reasonable doubt, that the Uromyces Caricis 

8 For record of previous cultures see Jour. Myc. 8 : 53. 1902; 10 : 

11. 1904; and u:58. 1905. 

9 See Bot. Gaz. 55: 21. 1903. 

10 Jour. Mycol. n : 58. 1905. 

11 For previous cultures see Bot. Gaz. 29 : 279. 1900; 55: 16. 1903; 
and Jour. Mycol. 8 : 52. 1902. 



16 


Journal of Mycology 


[Vol. 12 


of Peck is the amphisporic form of Puccinia Caricis. What 
determines the production of amphispores in this species is an 
interesting question, in view of the fact that only twice have 
they been found, and at such a great distance apart. The amphi¬ 
spores in the Colorado collection did not germinate in drop cul¬ 
ture, although the same conditions gave fine germination of the 
associated teleutospores. 

8. Puccinia fraxinata (Schw.) Arth. — A collection of 
teleutospores on Spartina cynosuroides, sent by Mr. Bartholo¬ 
mew from Hill City, Kans., was used to sow April 29, on Frax- 
inus lanceolata, Adelia acuminata and Ligustrum vulgare. Only 
the first host gave results, showing spermogonia May 5, and 
aecidia May 14, the sowing being made on a cut branch placed 
in water in the greenhouse. 12 

9. Puccinia amphigena Diet. — Teleutosporic material 
on Calamovilfa longifolia sent by Rev. Bates from Red Cloud, 
Neb., was sown on Smilax hispida May 27, and began to show 
spermogonia June 2, and aecidia June 10, both in abundance. 13 

10. Puccinia verbenicola (E. & K.) Arth. — Teleuto¬ 
sporic material on Sporobolus longifolius, sent from Red Cloud, 
Neb., by Rev. Bates, was sown on Verbena urticaefolia May 3, 
and showed spermogonia May 9, and aecidia May 20. Another 
collection on same host, obtained near Lafayette, Ind., was sown 
on same species of Verbena May 27, and showed spermogonia 
June 2, and aecidia June io. 14 

11. Puccinia pustulata (Curt.) Arth. — Teleutosporic 
material on Andropogon furcatus, gathered by the writer at Eng¬ 
lish Lake, Ind., was sown on Pentstemon hirsutus and Comandra 
umbellata May 27, with no infection of the Pentstemon, but 
abundant growth on the Comandra, spermogonia appearing June 
2, and aecidia June 14. This result confirms work done in 1903. 15 

12. Puccinia Pammelii (Trel.) Arth. — The cultural 
results of I904 1C were verified by sowing teleutospores from 
Panicum virgatum, obtained by the writer at English Lake, Ind., 
upon Euphorbia corollata. A sowing was made May 26, giving 
spermogonia June 2, and aecidia June 9. 

13. Puccinia subnitens Diet. Teleutosporic material on 
Distichlis spicata, sent from Red Cloud, Neb., by Rev. Bates, was 


12 For previous cultures see Bot. Gaz. .? 9 : 275. 1900; and Jour. 
Mycol. it: 57. 1905. 

13 For previous cultures see Bot. Gaz. 35 : 20. 1903; and Jour Mycol. 

10 : 11. 1904. 

14 For previous cultures see Bot. Gaz. 29 : 274. 1900 ; 35 : 16. 1903 ; • 
and Jour Mycol. n:56. 1905. 

15 Jour. Mycol. 10 : 17. 1904. 

16 Jour. Mycol. u: 56. 1905. 



Jan. 1906] 


Cultures of Uredineae in 1905 


17 


sown on Erysimum asperum, Sophia incisia, 17 Lepidium Virgini- 
cum, and Bursa Bursa-pastoris, with success in each case. The 
sowing was made April 18, and spermogonia appeared on Eryisi- 
mum and Sophia April 25, Lepidium April 26, and Bursa April 
27, while aecidia were observed on all by May 8. The aecidia 
develop with considerable difficulty on Bursa , and Rev. Bates 
writes that they are not common or abundant in the field on 
this host. On Lepidium they also start with less ease than 
on the other species, but under good conditions grow well. 18 

14. Puccinia poculiformis (Jacq.) Wettst. — Teleuto- 
sporic material on Agrostis alba , sent from Ithaca, N. Y., by 
Mr. Jackson, was sown on Berberis vulgaris April 13, and 
showed numerous spermogonia April 22, with abundance of 
aecidia May 4. 

15. Puccinia Sorghi Schw. — The work of last year, 19 in 
which only aecidia were used, was verified this season by sowing 
teleutospores. The material was obtained in Lafayette from an 
early garden variety of sweet corn. It was sown April 17 on 
Oxalis cymosa (the common wild wood sorrel of the region), 

0 . Ortgiesii (a yellow-flowered greenhouse weed), O. -, 

(a tuberous pink-flowered form of greenhouses), and O. Bowiei 
(a pink-flowered form with large flowers and leaves, also grown 
in greenhouses.) All remained free, except O. cymosa , which 
showed numerous spermogonia on April 27, and aecidia on May 
5. A second sowing was made May 1 on O. cymosa , O. Origiesii, 
O. Bowiei, and O. corniculata (growing out of doors over a grass- 
covered conduit for steam pipes), and again all remained free ex¬ 
cept O. cymosa , which gave spermogonia May 8, and eacidia May 
14. It is not apparent why no infection should occur on the four 
hosts other than O. cymosa , but there is no reason to suppose 
that it was due in any degree to lack of vigor or suitable con¬ 
ditions. 

The aecidiospores raised in the first trial above were sown 
May 6 on seedlings of the yellow dent field corn variety of Zea 
Mays, and in a week, May 13, showed uredospores, which 
increased in abundance until teleutospores were observed June 15. 
The uredospores from this culture (on yellow dent corn) were 
sown May 16 on small plants of garden sweet corn, and gave 

17 This is probably not the correct name of the plant used for the 

cultures. It is, however, the name also used last year for the trial host, 
which is the common species of Sophia in this region, and the error in 
determination is due to the confusion existing in the current manuals. 
The species is also different from the one on which the fungus was col¬ 
lected last year in Nebraska by Rev. Bates (Jour. Mycol. 11 : 116. 1905), 

and that is also incorrectly named. But for the sake of simplicity the 
name 3*. incisa will be used in this article for both species. 

18 For previous cultures see Bot. Gaz. 55:19. 1903; and Jour. 

Mycol. 11 : 54. 1905. 

18 Bot. Gaz. 5^:64. 1904. 




18 


Journal of Mycology 


[Vol. 12 



uredospores in plenty on May 23, and would doubtless have been 
followed by teleutospores in due time, had the culture been con¬ 
tinued. These results in transferring the rust from field corn 
to sweet corn, and the reverse, are in accord with those obtained 
by Kellerman. 20 

At the same time the first sowings were made, April 17, tel¬ 
eutospores were also sown on a seedling Zea Mays, under favor¬ 
able conditions, but no infection resulted. The drop cultures, 
which are made just previous to every sowing, showed that the 
teleutospores germinated freely, but the few uredospores inter¬ 
mixed were not viable. In this case, at least, the teleutospores 
appeared to be incapable of infecting the host from which taken, 
and in so far agree with the general rule regarding grass and 
sedge rusts. 

16. Puccinia Polygon 1- am phibii Pers. — In 1904 21 it 
was possible to verify in a measure the work upon this species 
by Dr. Tranzschel of St. Petersburg, by sowing aecidiospores 
from Geranium maculatum and obtaining teleutospores on Poly¬ 
gonum emersum. This season the reverse order of sowing was 
tried. Teleutospores from P. emersum obtained in this vicinity 
were sown April 15 on G. maculatum and G. Robertianum, with 
no infection of the latter, but most abundant infection of the 
former, showing spermogonia April 23 and aecidia May 1. A 
second sowing was made April 27, using the above two hosts 
and also G. pusillum, and again infection occurred only upon G. 
maculatum , which showed great numbers of spermogonia May 3, 
and aecidia May 9. These results agree with common observa¬ 
tion, for the aecidium on G. maculatum (A. sanguinolentum 
Lindr.) is common in the United States, while no aecidia have 
yet been reported on G. Robertianum or G. pussillum. 

17. Puccinia Helianthi Schw. — A sowing of teleuto¬ 
spores, taken from Helianthus grosse-serratus growing on the 
grounds of the University, was made May 17 on H. grosse-serra¬ 
tus and two plants of H. annuus with equally abundant results 
in each case, spermogonia showing May 25, and aecidia June 2. 

18. Puccinia lateripes B. & Br. — After many vain 
attempts to secure good fungous and host material of this species 
for culture work, the present season’s excellent results have given 
much satisfaction. All the material was obtained near Lafayette, 
Ind. Sowings of teleutospores from Ruellia ciliosa, were made 
April 25 on both R. ciliosa and R. strepens, with equally positive 
results in both cases, showing spermogonia May 5, and aecidia 
May 18. Another sowing of the same material was made on 
R. strepens May 27, which gave spermogonia June 5, and aecidia 

20 Cf. Jour. Mycol. 11 : 27. 1905. 

21 Jour. Mycol. 11 : 59. 1905. 








Jan. 1906] 


Cultures of Uredineae in 1905 


19 


June 15. A sowing of teleutospores from R. strepens on R. cili- 
osa May 8, and another June 7, gave no infection. 

Many writers, following Lagerheim, who received his clue 
from Burrill, have made two species of the rusts on these two 
hosts. It is true that the gross appearance, and to some extent 
the microscopic characters of the two are perceptibly different. 
These differences are shown, so far as the development went, in the 
results of the cultures. The aecidial groups grown on R. ciliosa 
were small and round, one to two millimeters across, without 
noticeable hypertrophy of the tissues, and confined to the blade 
of the leaf. On R. strepens, however, they took possession of 
the veins, petioles and stems, and made large swellings from 20 
to 25 millimeters long, and in one case the main steam for a 
distance of ten centimeters or more was greatly swollen and dis¬ 
torted. The differences also extended to the peridial cups and 
to the spores. On R. ciliosa the cups were mostly one-half 
millimeter high, and on R. strepens fully one millimeter high. 
The aecidiospores from R. ciliosa measured 15-19 by 20-26/1,, and 
from R. strepens 17-21 by 24-30/1. These two cultures were 
from the same source of infection, and must therefore be one 
and the same species. Had uredospores and teleutospores been 
raised, it is believed that the differences recorded in the books 
for the two hosts would have been found. In short it is believed 
that the differences of size and appearance are entirely due to the 
influence of the hosts. The loose, somewhat succulent tissues of 
R. strepens, and its vigorous habit of growth, are correlated with 
the greater development of the fungus, while the firm close tis¬ 
sues of R. ciliosa, not only prevent luxuriant development of the 
parasite, but its parts become smaller throughout. These differ¬ 
ences in the hosts also account for the failure to infect R. ciliosa 
with spores from R. strepens, while the reverse process succeeded. 
There appears to be no reason to doubt that under very favor¬ 
able conditions the infection of R. ciliosa with spores from R. 
strepens could be accomplished, and the resulting development be 
the same as when the infecting spores came from R. ciliosa 
itself. 22 

19. Puccinia Pruni-spinosae Pers.— The Aecidium punc- 
tatum Pers. (A. quadriddum DC.) occurring in various parts 
of the United States and Canada on different species of Anem¬ 
one, Hepatica and Thalictrum so closely resembles the European 
form which bears the same name, that little doubt has existed 
of their genuine identity. In 1904 Dr. Tranzschel 23 of St. 
Petersburg made cultures of this aecidium, sowing the aecidio¬ 
spores from Aniemone coronaria on Amygdalus communis 
(almond) Prunus spinosa (blackthorn), P. divaricata (cherry- 

22 For previous cultures see Kellerman in Jour. Mycol. 9 : 107. 1903. 

23 Trav. Mus. Bot. Acad. Sci. St. Petersb. n: 67-69. 1905. 



20 


fouriial of Mycology 


[Vol. 12 


plum) and from Anemone ranunculoides on P. spinosa, produc¬ 
ing in each the characteristic uredospores of Puccinia Pruni- 
spinosae, the rust of plums and peaches. 

This work by Dr. Tranzschel suggested the following trials 
with American material. Aecidiospores from Hepatica acutiloba 
(Aecidium hepticatum Schw.) were sown on three small plants 
of Prunits serotina (wild black cherry), established in pots in the 
greenhouse, on Primus Americana (native plum), P. Cerasus 
(cultivated cherry), and Amygdalus Persica (peach), the last 
two seedlings. The sowings were made May I to 4, and in fifteen 
days afterward, uredospores appeared on P. serotina, but the 
other plants remained wholly free, watch being continued for a 
month and more. The successful sowings were as follows: 

May 1, Aecidiospores sown on P. serotina; May 16, uredospores; May 22, 
teleutospores. 

May 1, Aecidiospores sown on P. serotina; May 16, uredospores. 

May 2, Aecidiospores sown on P. serotina; May 17, uredospores. 

On May 23, a sowing of uredospores, which had been grown 
on P. serotina, was made on A. Persica, under seemingly most 
favorable conditions, but no infection took place, watch being 
kept for two months. 

From these results there can be no further question of the 
general identity of the American and European plum and cherry 
rusts, and their connection with the Aecidium punctatum. It is 
not possible to state what significance is to be attached to the 
failure to infect peach, plum and cultivated cherry with spores 
that readily infected the wild cherry. Careful search for two 
seasons in the vicinity of the diseased hepaticas, the fungus being 
perennial, has failed to detect any rust on plums, cherries or 
peaches, wild or cultivated, although growing in plenty; and 
furthermore Puccinia Pruni-spinosae has not yet been reported 
from Indiana, although said to occur in the adjoining state of 
Illinois on P. serotina, P. Virginiana, and P. Americana. 

20. Puccinia Xanthii Schw. — Teleutosporic material 
on Xanthium Canadense, gathered near Lafayette, Ind., on Nov. 
5, 1904, was sown on the second and third leaves of seedlings of 
the same species of host April 3. On April 8 small yellow dots 
began to show, which closely simulated spermogonia, but which 
microscopic examination by means of sections proved were only 
the very young teleutosporic sori. The yellow dots increased in 
size, appearing like small pimples, and finally broke through the 
epidermis, exposing the teleutospores April 21, eighteen days 
after inoculation. Another sowing was made April 13, on the 
cotyledons of the same species of host, and on the second leaves 
of Ambrosia triftda. The Xanthium seed-leaves showed yellow 
dots on April 22, and open sori May 1, also in eighteen days 
from sowing, but the Ambrosia leaves remained free. 






Jan. 1906] 


Cultures of Uredineae in 1905 


21 


These results agree essentially with those reported by Carle- 
ton, 24 who was able to infect Xanthium in eighteen and fourteen 
days, but could not infect Ambrosia. He says, however, that 
“in all these cases spermogonia preceded the teleutospores in the 
infected spots.” In connection with an account of cultures with 
Puccinia heterospora he adds that “numerous experiments were 
also made with other lepto species, including Puccinia Grindeiiae 
Pk., P. variolans Hark., P. Lygodesmiae E. & E., and P. Sher- 
ardiana Korn., with results similar to those above mentioned,” 
but he does not report the details of these cultures, if such they 
were. 

Taking the observations here recorded for P. Xanthii, espe¬ 
cially in connection with those for P. Silphii and P. Grindeiiae, 
reported below, it seems safe to assume that these species, and 
those quoted as mentioned by Carleton, belong to a group of 
rusts in which teleutospores and their resulting sporidia are 
the only spore-forms produced in the life-cycle, aecidia, uredo, 
and even spermogonia being wholly absent. 


The following nine species have never been tested before 
by the culture method, so far as the writer knows, either in this 
country or abroad. They embrace an interesting diversity of 
habit. Besides the grass and sedge forms, with which this series 
of cultures has been most concerned, there are two leptopucciniae, 
one micropuccinia and one brachypuccinia, also one of the grass 
rusts is chiefly interesting for its amphispores. 

1. Puccinia Silphii Schw. — Teleutosporic material was 
gathered March 31, 1905, near Lafayette, Ind., on dead and 
weathered leaves of Silphium integrifolium, and sown April 10 
on vigorous plants of the same host, and also on S', perfoliatum. 
There was no infection on the latter host, but on the former 
clear yellow dots showed April 15, which sectioned and placed 
under the microscope proved to be very young teleutosori. 
These yellow dots rapidly enlarged, forming pale pimples scat¬ 
tered over yellow patches of the leaf, with much hypertrophied 
tissues, and April 20 broke through the epidermis, exposing the 
abundant teleutospores. Another sowing on the same two hosts 
was made April 25, and with the same results: there was no 
infection of .S’. perfoliatum, and the most abundant infection of 
S. integrifolium, showing as yellow dots May 2, and exposed 
teleutospores May 5. As the rust occurs on both these species 
of Silphium, and many others as well, the results may be taken as 
indicative of biological races. 

2. Puccinia Grindeliae Pk. — Excellent teleutosporic ma¬ 
terial on Gutierrezia Sarothrae was sent by Mr. Bethel, collected 


24 Bulletin Bureau PI. Industry, No. 63:26. 1904. 




22 


Journal of Mycology 


[Vol. 12 


at Boulder, Colo., March 27, 1905, on weathered stems. Mr. 
Bethel also kindly sent growing plants of the host and of Chryso- 
thamnus nauscolus. The latter is not a recorded host for P. 
Grindeliae, but for a similar species, P. tuberculous E. & E. A 
sowing was made on G. Sarothrae April 12, which showed yellow 
dots April 21, and numerous open teleutosori May 2. Another 
sowing was made on both hosts April 26, with no infection on 
C. nauseolus, but most abundant infection on G. Sarothrae, 
showing yellow dots May 4, and open teleutosori May 15. The 
yellow dots were investigated, as in the other instances, and 
found to be the early stages of teleutosori, with no trace of 
spermogonia. 

3. Puccinia Solidaginis Pk. — Teleutosporic material 
was sent by Mr. Garrett, collected at Salt Lake City, Utah, on 
Solidago trinervata, April 8, 1905. It was sown on .S'. Canadensis 
May 17, showing yellow dots June 2, and an abundance of open 
teleutosori June 7, with considerable hypertrophy of the tissues. 
Although the yellow dots were not specially investigated, they 
gave the same appearance of being young sori, as in the above 
species of leptopucciniae. 

4. Puccinia transformans E. & E.— Remarkably fine 
teleutosporic material, forming considerable excrescences on 
leaves and stems of Stenolobium Stans (Tecoma Stans), was 
sent by Mr. Horne, who collected it at Santiago de las Vegas, 
Cuba, May 3, 1905. It was sown on two young plants of S. 
Stans May 13, and in both cases gave abundance of spermogonia 
May 29, and of teleutospores June 5. 

Fine material gathered by Mr. J. B. Rorer on the pods of 
S. Stans in the Bahama Ids., at Nassau, New Providence, March, 
1904, was sent for identification. The pods contained many seeds, 
which were planted in the greenhouse, and provided the host 
plants for the above inoculations. The teleutospores of this col¬ 
lection were in good germinating condition. As there were no 
growing plants of N. Stans at hand, they were sown May 20 
(1904) on vigorous young plants of Camp sis radio ans (Tecoma 
radicans), but gave no infection, although the conditions seemed 
particularly favorable. 

Since the cultures were made a study of the characters of 
the species has been undertaken, and the conclusion reached that 
all North American collections, so far as known, belong to P. 
transformans ( P . exitiosa Syd. & Holw.). An original specimen 
of P. transformans, collected in Baja California by K. Brandegee 
in 1893 on Tecoma Stans, has been examined, and found to agree 
with other specimens on the same host from the West Indies, 
and also with the type material of P. exitiosa on Tecoma mollis, 
that is Stenolobium mollis, from Mexico. The species possesses 
considerably smaller spores, with thinner walls and finer sculp- 




Jan. 1906] 


Cultures of Uredineae in 1905 


23 


turing, than Puccinia elegans Schrot., reported only from Argen- 
tine, South America, an original specimen of which I have been 
able to examine through the courtesy of Dr. P. Hennings of the 
Botanical Garden, Berlin. P. transformans has not yet been 
reported from any locality in the United States. 

5. Puccinia Kuhniae Schw. — Teleutosporic material, 
gathered near Lafayette, Ind., Nov. 3, 1904, on Kuhnia eupatori- 
oides, was sown on the same host May 19. On May 28 spermo- 
gonia appeared sparingly, which were examined under the micro¬ 
scope in section, and these were followed June 5 by uredo in 
fair abundance. The species, therefore, belongs to the group 
of brachypuccinia. 

6. Puccinia canaliculata (Schw.) Lagerh. — An obser¬ 
vation in the field made in 1904 led to the present successful cul¬ 
tures. Aecidia were found in remarkable abundance on seedling 
Xanthium Canadense over an area 8 to 10 meters in diameter, 
beyond which the aecidium did not occur, although the hosts 
were equally plentiful and equally exposed. Later in the season, 
the middle of June, uredosori were found upon what appeared 
to be a seedling sedge extending over approximately the same 
area that had been occupied in the spring by the cocklebur cluster 
cups, and this was followed in August by teleutosori. Although 
the sedge did not fruit, yet it was not difficult to ascertain that 
it was a species of Cyperus, and the rust Puccinia canaliculata. 

On May 11 a sowing of aecidiospores, obtained from the 
locality mentioned, was made in the greenhouse on Cyperus 
esculentus, other species of the genus not being at hand, and on 
June 2 uredo were noticed, although they probably appeared ear¬ 
lier and were overlooked, being small and pale. Another sow¬ 
ing was made on the same species of host May 17, and uredo 
first noticed June 2. The plants did not grow well, and the 
infected leaves were removed for the herbarium before time 
enough had elapsed in which to develop telutosori. Cultures with 
teleutosporic material will doubtless confirm this association of 
the Xanthium and Cyperus rusts. 

7. Puccinia Eleochardis Arth.— Teleutosporic material 
on Eleocharis palustris was sent by Dr. Davis from Racine, Wis., 
and with it the information that from observations in the field 
he believed this to have its aecidial phase on Eupatorium. Act¬ 
ing upon this suggestion, a sowing was made May 5 on Eupa¬ 
torium perfoliatum, which gave rise to spermogonia May 13, and 
aecidia May 22. Another sowing on the same species of host May 
11, gave spermogonia May 20, and aecidia May 30. Both trials 
produced an abundance of aecidia, with all the characteristics of 
the common and widely distributed form on this host, and closely 
related species. 


24 


Journal of Mycology 


[Vol. 12 


8. Puccinia substerilis E. & E. — Fine material on Stipa 
viridula collected in August, 1904, at Boulder, Colo., was sent 
by Mr. Bethel, who also sent living plants of A. viridula and .S'. 
comata. This material showed a great abundance of amphi- 
spores, 25 but almost no teleutospores. The amphispores gave 
good germination, and were sown April 6 on S. viridula and S. 
comata . Uredospores of the usual kind began to appear on S. 
viridula April 18, but no infection on S. comata. Another sow¬ 
ing was made April 22 on S. comata, which also gave no infec¬ 
tion. Uredospores continued to form for a month on 5 . viridula, 
but no amphispores or teleutospores were produced. 

Mr. Bethel also sent fine teleutosporic material on Stipa 
comata, collected in March, 1905, at Boulder, Colo. This was 
sown on Aster ericoides April 18, and contrary to expectation 
gave no infection. When the failure became assured, it was 
sown again, April 29, on A. ericoides, A. multidorus, and A. 
Novae-Angliae, but in each case without infection. This nega¬ 
tive result throws some doubt on the assumption that the Ameri¬ 
can Stipa rusts on the several species of hosts belong to one 
species, having its aecidia on certain species of Aster, 26 and the 
present very incomplete report is therefore entered under the name 
P. substerilis. Reducing this name to a synonym of P. stipae, as 
the writer did a few months since, 27 is now believed to have 
been premature. 

9. Puccinia Seymouriana Arth. — At the time this spe¬ 
cies was published, 28 it was suggested upon grounds of spore 
resemblance that its Aecidium was A. Cephalanthi Seym. From 
combined morphological and geographical data I was then will¬ 
ing to assert that “although cultures must be awaited, yet there 
can be little doubt that the early stages of P. Seymouriana occur 
upon Cephalanthus.” Persistent efforts to secure material for 
this trial were finally rewarded by the writer finding especially 
good teleutospores on Spartina cynosuroides at English Lake, 
Ind., in the northern part of the state, in March, 1905. These 
were sown on Poly gala Senega April 20, with no infection, and 
later on Cephalanthus occidentalis, May 13, with abundant 
results. On May 18 great numbers of spermogonia began to 
show, and on May 27 still greater numbers of aecidia, thus veri¬ 
fying the prediction made three years before. 

10. Uromyces acuminatus Arth. — Finding the aecidium 
of this very common rust was due to a fortunate accident. Of 
the many trials to find the connection between the two phases 

20 For description and illustrations of the amphipores in this species 
see Bull Torr. Bot. Club 32 : 38. 1905. 

20 For cultures of Puccinia Stipae see Jour. Mycol. 11 : 63. 1905. 

27 Tour. Mycol. it: 11. 1905. 

28 Bot. Gaz. 34 : 12. 1902. 





Jan. 1906] 


Cultures of Ureduieae in 1905 


25 


of a heteroecoius rust, during my seven years of experimental 
work, this is the first instance of success without the aid of some 
probable clue, and in this case may be ascribed to good luck and 
the exuberant enthusiasm of Mr. Kern, who made all the sow¬ 
ings of the season. 

Teleutosporic material on Spartina cynosuroides, collected 
at Palmer, Neb., by Rev. Bates, was sown May 26, on whatever 
plants were available in the greenhouse, that are recorded as 
bearing aecidia of unknown teleutosporic connection. These 
hosts were: Polemonium rcptans, Poly gala Senega, Cassia Cha- 
maecrista, Psoralen Onobrychis, Rudbeckia laciniata, Ambrosia 
artemisiaefolia, Thalictrum dioicum, Viola papilionacea, and Stei- 
roncma ciliatum. To our great surprise A. ciliatum began to 
show spermogonia June 1, and abundant aecidia June 6, all others 
having no infection. Another sowing was at once made, June 2, 
which likewise gave spermogonia June 7, and aecidia June 12. 

The aecidium on this host is recorded or known to the writer 
from Iowa, Illinois, Nebraska, Kansas, Wyoming and Minnesota. 
A collection made in Wisconsin 29 on N. lanceolatum is thought 
by Burrill 30 to be specifically distinct. Schlechtendahl’s name, 
Caeoma Lysimachiae, sometimes used for American specimens, 
was founded on an aecidium on L. thyrsidora L. (Naumburgia 
thyrsidora (L.) Duby) from vicinity of Berlin, and doubtless is 
entirely distinct from American forms, with the possible excep¬ 
tion of the reference in Farlow & Seymour’s Host Index, 31 the 
basis for which is unknown to the writer. Schweinitz’s name 32 
Aecidium Lysimachiae applies to the form on Lysimachia quad- 
rifolia and L. terrestris, only reported from North Carolina, and 
may well be considered distinct. What is now much needed is 
teleutosporic material from the Atlantic and Gulf coasts to be 
used in cultures for testing the above points, and in general the 
question whether the eastern and western forms are one species 
or not. 

The great prevalence of this rust on Spartina, and the com¬ 
parative rarity of the aecidia on Steironema, is doubtless due in 
part to the hardiness of the uredospores, which enable them to 
live over winter and start the uredostage in the spring under 
favorable conditions. This is the opinion expressed by Mr. 
Bartholomew in a recent interview, and is my own opinion, 
founded in part upon finding uredosori upon young blades of 
Spartina only a few inches long at such an early date in spring 
that infection by means of aecidiospores seemed highly improb¬ 
able. 


29 Trelease, Paras. Fung. Wis. p. 30. 

30 Burrill, Paras. Fung. Ill., I. Uredineae, p. 233. 
31 L. c. p.75. 1890. 

32 Schrift. d. nat. Ges. Leipzig 1 : 67. 1822. 



26 


Journal of Mycology 


|Vol. 12 


SUMMARY. 

The following is a complete list of successful cultures made 
during the season of 1904. It is divided into the two series: 
species previously reported by the writer or other investigators, 
and species now reported for the first time. 

A. Species previously reported. 

1. Melampsora Medusae Thuem.— Teleutospores from 
Populus deltoides Marsh, sown on Larix laricina (DuR.) Koch. 

2. Gymnosporangium Juniperi-Virginianae Schw.—Tel¬ 
eutospores from Juniperus Virginiana L. sown on Malus Malus 
(L.) Britt. 

3. Puccinia Sambuci (Schw.) Arth. — Teleutospores 
from Carex lupulina Muhl. sown on Sambucus Canadensis L. 

4. Puccinia albiperidia Arth. — Teleutospores from Ca¬ 
rex tetanica Schk. sown on Ribes gracile Michx. 

5. Puccinia Caricis-Solidaginis Arth. — Teleutospores 
from Carex sparganioides Muhl. sown on Solidago Canadensis L. 

6. Puccinia Peckii (DeT.) Kellerm. — Teleutospores 
from Carex lanuginosa Michx. sown on Onagra biennis (L.) 
Scop. 

7. Puccinia Caricis (Schum.) Reb. — Teleutospores from 
Carex stipata Muhl. and C. aquatilis Wahl, sown on Urtica gra¬ 
cilis Ait. 

8. Puccinia fraxinata (Schw) Arth. — Teleutospores 
from Spartina cynosuroides Willd. sown on Fraxinus lanceolata 
Borck. 

9. Puccinia amphigena Diet. — Teleutospores from Ca- 
lamovilfa longifolia (Hook.) Hack, sown on Smilax hispida 
Muhl. 

10. Puccinia verbenicola (E. & K.) Arth. — Teleuto¬ 
spores from Sporobolus longifolius (Torr.) Wood, sown on 
Verbena urticaefolia L. 

11. Puccinia pustulata (Curt.) Arth. — Teleutospores 
from Andropogon furcatus Muhl. sown on Comandra umbellata 
(L.) Nutt. 

12. Puccinia Pammelii (Trek) Arth. — Teleutospores 
from Panicum virgatum L. sown on Euphorbia corollata L. 

13. Puccinia subnitens Diet. — Teleutospores from Dis- 
tichlis spicata (L.) Greene, sown on Erysimum asperum DC., 
Sophia incisa (Eng.) Gr., Lepidium Virginicum L. and Bursa 
Bursa-pastoris (L.) Britt. 

14. Puccinia poculiformis (Jacq.) Wettst. — Teleuto¬ 
spores from Agrostis alba L. sown on Berberis vulgaris L. 



Jan. 1906] 


Cultures of Uredmeae in 1905 


27 


15. Puccinia Sorghi Schw.— Teleutospores from Zea 
Mays L. sown on Oxalis cymosa Small.; aecidospores from 
Oxalis cymosa, sown on Zea Mays; and uredospores from Zea 
Mays sown on same host. 

16. Puccinia Polygoni-amphibii Pers. — Teleutospores 
from Polygonum emersum (Michx.) Britt, sown on Geranium 
maculatum L. 

17. Puccinia Helianthi Schw. — Teleutospores from 
Helianthus grosse-serratus Mart, sown on H. grosse-serratus 
Mart, and H. annuus L. 

18. Puccinia lateripes B. & Br. — Teleutospores from 
Ruellia ciliosa Pursh, sown on R. ciliosa Pursh and R. strepens L. 

19. Puccinia Pruni-spinosae Pers. — Aecidiospores from 
Hepatica acutiloba D C. sown on Prunus serotina Ehrh. 

20. Puccinia Xanthii Schw. — Resting teleutospores 
from Xanthium Canadense Mill, sown on same host. 

B. Species reported nozu for the hrst time. 

1. Puccinia Silphii Schw. — Resting teleutospores from 
Silphium integrifolium Michx. sown on same host. 

2. Puccinia Grindeliae Pk. — Resting teleutospores 
from Gutierrezia- Sarothrae (Pursh) B. & R. sown on same host. 

3. Puccinia Solidaginis Pk. — Resting teleutospores 
from Solidago trinervata Greene, sown on S. Canadensis L. 

4. Puccinia transformans E. & E. — Resting teleuto¬ 
spores from Stenolobium Stans (L.) Don. sown on same host. 

5. Puccinia Kuhniae Schw. — Teleutospores from 
Kuhnia eupatorioides L. sown on same host. 

6. Puccinia canaliculata (Schw.) Lagerh. — Aecidio¬ 
spores from Xanthium Canadense Mill, sown on Cyperus escu- 
lentis L. 

7. Puccinia Eleocharidis Arth. — Teleutospores from 
Eleocharis palustris (L.) R. & S. sown on Eupatorium perfolia - 

turn L. 

8. Puccinia substerilis E. & E. — Amphispores from 
Stipa viridula Trin. sown on same host. 

9. Puccinia Seymouriana Arth. — Teleutospores from 
Spartina cynosuroides Willd. sown on Cephalanthus occidenta¬ 
ls L. 

10. Uromyces acuminatus Arth. — Teleutospores from 
Spartina cynosuroides Willd. sown on Steironema ciliatum (L.) 
Raf. 


Purdue University, Lafayette, Ind. 


28 


Journal of Mycology 


[Vol. 12 


PEZIZA FUSICARPA GER. AND PEZIZA SEMITOSTA 

B. & C. 

ELIAS J. DURAND. 

Peziza fusicarpa Ger. is one of the common discomycetes 
of the eastern United States. The attractive bowl-shaped asco- 
mata were among my earliest collections in the group, and have 
been ever since among my favorite objects of observation during 
the summer months. This continued interest has resulted in the 
accumulation of a large series of notes which I have been sev¬ 
eral times on the point of arranging for publication. This has 
seemed the more desirable because the available descriptions of 
P. fusicarpa and its allied forms are at best incomplete, and cer¬ 
tain recent attempts at elaboration have introduced at least as 
many new elements of confusion as they have dispelled. Mr. 
Morgan’s note on Peziza pubida B. & C., in the July number of 
this Journal has called up the matter once more, and the follow¬ 
ing contribution is offered in the hope of adding something to 
our knowledge of the species, and at the same time of clearing 
up what I believe to be certain misconceptions regarding some 
of our choicest fungi. 

It may not be out of place to state at once that these obser¬ 
vations are based on about 50 separate collections, besides numer¬ 
ous ungathered plants in the field. The individuals are occa¬ 
sionally so abundant on the rich sloping banks of ravines near 
Ithaca, that quarts of them may be gotten in some spots. The 
herbarium material studied includes the specimens of P. fusicarpa 
collected near Poughkeepsie by Gerard, and sent by him to Cooke 
to be figured in Mycographia (fig. 113), as well as other speci¬ 
mens from the same locality and collector in the Ellis Herba¬ 
rium, at the New York Botanical Garden. Inasmuch as no one 
seems to know the whereabouts of Gerard’s own herbarium, or 
even whether it is longer in existence, these two specimens must 
be regarded as the most authentic of the species to which access 
may be had. 

Other specimens examined include P. pubida B. & C.: the 
type in Berkeley’s herbarium at Kew; P. semitosta B. & C.: 
Berkeley's type at Kew, as well as a duplicate of Dr. Michener’s 
original collection in the herbarium of Elias Fries, at Upsala. 
What appear to be portions of the types of both the last named 
species are also present in Massee’s herbarium, now at the New 
York Botanical Garden. 

Peziza morgani Mass, is represented by the type in Massee’s 
herbarium as above, as well as by a specimen sent me by Mr. 
Morgan himself marked “type.” Of P. hainesii Ell. the type 
and other examples so named in the Ellis Collection, at New 
York, have been studied. 




Jan. 1906] 


Peziza fusicarpa Ger ., Etc. 


29 


My conclusions based upon a study of the material indicated 
may be stated briefly as follows: Peziza fusicarpa Ger. (1873), 
P. pubida B. & C. (1875), and P. morgani Mass. (1902) are 
specifically identical and synonymous; P. semitosta B. & C., 
while closely allied to P. pubida B. & C., is not identical with it, 
but is specificly distinct; P. hainesii Ell. (1881) is identical with 
P. semitosta B. & C. (1875), as recently stated by Ellis himself 
(Jour. Myc. 10: 170). 

Whether these species shall be assigned to Lachnea or Mac¬ 
ropodia of Saccardo’s arrangement may be regarded as a matter 
of individual opinion. The descriptions indicate the presence or 
absence of a stem as the primary distinction between the genera. 
This is surely a most illusive character. P. fusicarpa shows 
great variability in this respect. Often in a single cluster one 
finds a range from cups absolutely sessile to those with stems 
of maximum size. An examination of hundreds of growing 
plants shows that one-half or two-thirds, perhaps, possess some 
sort of a stem. Lachnea as defined by Saccardo and others is 
certainly a complex which must be broken up. The name even 
must be abandoned for a genus of fungi. Macropodia Fckl. was 
based on a single species M. macropus (Pers.) Fckl., which is 
included by many writers in Helvella, a refernce which seems at 
least problematical. The excipular structure of the species here 
considered is quite different from that of most of the species 
of Lachnea, but corresponds more closely to that of M. macropus. 
The general pliable, leathery texture indicates further relation¬ 
ship with that species. In Macropodia, then, our plants may 
best be placed until the time when the whole group shall have 
been thoroughly worked over and revised in accordance with 
other and perhaps better bases of arrangement. 

My ideas of the characters and specific limits of the two 
species may be gotten from the following descriptions. 

Macropodia fusicarpa (Ger.) Durand. 

Peziza fusicarpa Ger., Bull Torr. Bot. Club 4:64.1873. 

Peziza ( Sarcoscyphae ) pubida B. & C., Grev. 3:153. 

1875- 

Macropodia pubida (B. & C.) Sacc., Syll. 8: 159.1889. 

Lachnea fusicarpa (Ger) Sacc., Syll. 8:172.1889. 

Peziza velutina B. &. C. (ined.) in Curtis Bot. N. Car. 

. 132.1867. 

Peziza morgani Mass., Journ. Myc. 8:190.1902. 

Exsicc. : Ellis, N. A. F. n. 1269; E. & E., F. Col. n. 1307. 

Illust. : Cooke, Mycog. figs, no, 113; Grev. 3. pi. 44. f. 

226; Seaver, Bull. Lab. Nat. Hist. Iowa 5, pi. 20. 

f. 1. 


30 


Journal of Mycology 


[Vol. 12 


Plants solitary or gregarious, often densely so, sessile or 
stipitate; ascomata at first closed, then expanding until hemi- 
spherical-cupulate, the margin slightly incurved, occasionally 
becoming saucer-shaped; hymenium at first bluish-pallid or 
creamy-wliite changing to ochraceous, finally becoming dark 
brown when old or dry, externally slightly darker, velvety on 
account of the short bay-brown hairs, which are flexuous, rather 
thin-walled, obtuse, 1-4 (rarely more) septate, the segments 
somewhat irregular, about 100-250x20^ (rarely longer) ; plants 
variable in size, .5-4 cm. in diam., 1-2.5 cm * deep, fleshy-leathery, 
pliable, flesh thin; excipulum and hymenium equally thick, the 
former composed of two distinct layers of equal thickness: the 
ental one of interwoven hypae, 5 /a thick, running more or less 
parallel to the sides of the cup; the ectal one parenchymatous, 
cells more or less quadrate, somewhat longer than broad, with 
rather thick walls, arranged in rows at right angles to the sur¬ 
face, some of the rows being continued outward to form the 
hairs; stem either entirely absent or up to 1.5 cm. high, .5-1 cm. 
thick, compressed, often longitudinally sulcate or puckered at the 
summit, velvety. Asci stout, cylindrical-clavate, apex rounded, 
not blue with iodine, 260-325x15-1 S/x; spores 8, obliquely uni- 
seriate or rarely subbiseriate above, hyaline, continuous, fusi¬ 
form, at maturity distinctly granular roughened, contents gran¬ 
ular, 2-guttulate, straight or curved, 32-44x10-11^ (majority 
36-41/x). Paraphyses cylindrical, septate, brown, slightly thick¬ 
ened above, 6-8/x, thick. 

On soil and humus, rarely on very rotten wood, in rich 
woods and on slopes of ravines, July to Sept. Ontario to Ala¬ 
bama and Iowa. 

A common and characteristic, but variable species. The 
average diameter is about 2 cm., but specimens twice that size 
are not uncommon. Berkeley and Massee described their plants 
from dried material in which the hymenium is brown. Gerard, 
on the other hand, described the hymenium as “at first ochra¬ 
ceous, at length dark brown.” The creamy or ochraceous tints 
are the ones most often seen, but in very fresh young specimens 
the color is paler resembling that of Lachnea hemispherica. As 
previously stated, about one-half to two-thirds of the ascomata 
possess some sort of a stem, and all variations may be seen in 
a single group. The length of the hairs also varies considerably, 
but those longer than 250 [x are rarely seen. The dried flesh 
when moistened up is distinctly leathery-gelatinous, but this 
character is not evident in the fresh state. The young spores 
are smooth and smaller than mature ones, the latter being dis¬ 
tinctly roughened in all the examples I have seen. The shape 
is distinctly fusiform rather than elliptical-oblong as in the next 
species. They are very rarely as short as 33^. In Gerard’s col¬ 
lections of P. fusicarpa they measure 33-43x10-12/*; in the type 




Jan. 1906] 


Peziza fusicarpa Ger ., Etc . 


31 


of P. pubida 35-40x10 \x, while those of the type of P. morgani 
are 35-40x10-11/a. The paraphyses are nearly colorless in young 
plants, but the contents soon become brownish, finally deep brown 
throughout — a change coordinate with the change in color of 
the hymenium from cream-color through ochraceous to brown. 

The identity of P. morgani with P. pubida (as represented 
in Ellis, N. A. F. 11. 1269) was first indicated by Mr. Seaver 
( 1 . c.), in 1904. He also later called attention to the fact that 
the specimen in Rab.-Winter, F. Eur. n. 3275, called P. pubida 
B. & C., is different, being smooth, and having different spores. 
Mr. Seaver’s position is well taken, as I had already satisfied 
myself by examination of several copies including the one at 
Kew quoted by Massee. The specimens under that number 
belong to a species nearly allied to, if not identical with, Peziza 
atrovinosa Cke., the spores being elliptical, 15X8-9/X, rugose 
roughened, and brown when mature. This latter species is not 
uncommon in the eastern United States. 

Peziza velutina B. & C. was mentioned by Curtis ( 1 . c.), and 
was said by Cooke to be “undescribed and uncertain.” Dr. Peck 
(Rep. 28:68) declared that according to specimens from Curtis 
it is the same as P. fusicarpa Ger. In the Kew Herbarium the 
name of the type specimen of P. pubida was first written “P. 
velutina B. & C.,” then the “velutina” was lined out and “pubida” 
written above it. It seems probable, therefore, that Berkeley 
first thought of naming the species “P. velutina,” and reported 
that name to Curtis (before 1867), but before publication (1875) 
decided to substitute the name pubida, which he did. 

Material examined: Ontario: Hull, J. Macoun; Toronto, 
J. Dearness. 

Connecticut : Redding, F. S. Earle; Mt. Carmel, R. Thax- 

ter. 

New York: Poughkeepsie, W. R. Gerard; Ithaca, Durand 
et al.; Canandaigua, Durand; Honeoye, Durand. 

Pennsylvania: Bethlehem, E. A. Rau (Herb. Ellis) ; West 
Chester, Everhart and Haines. 

West Virginia: Nuttallburg, L. W. Nuttall. 

Alabama : Peters. 

Ohio: Preston, A. P. Morgan. 

Iowa : Decorah, E. W. D. Holway; Iowa City and Mt. Pleas¬ 
ant, F. J. Seaver. 

Macropodia semitosta (B. & C.) Sacc., Syll. 8:159.1889. 

Peziza ( Sarcoscyphae ) semitosta B. & C., Grev. 3: 

153.1875. 

Peziza hainesii Ell., Bull. Torr. Bot. Club 8:65.1881 

Lachnea hainesii (Ell.) Sacc., Syll. 8:186.1889. 

Exsicc. : Ellis, N. A. F. n. 562; E. & E., N. A. F. n. 

2740. 


32 


Journal of Mycology [Vol. 12 

Must. : Cooke, Mycog. f. 109; Grev. 3. pi. 44. f. 225; 
Jour. Linn. Soc. Bot. 31. pi. 16. f. 19. 

Plants sessile or short stipitate, cupulate or urceolate, 2-4 
cm. diam.; hymenium creamy-white when fresh becoming brown 
on drying; cup clothed externally with rufous brown hairs which 
are obtuse, up to 4-5-septate, scarcely constricted at the septa, 
rather thin walled, up to 350/4 long, rarely longer; stem when 
present stout, more or less longitudinally plicate and sometimes 
lacunose below. Asci clavate-cylindrical, apex rounded, 300- 
325x15/4; spores uniseriate, hyaline, continuous, granular-rough- 
ened, elliptical to elliptical-oblong, 25-33x10-12^ (majority 28- 
32/x) ; paraphyses cylindrical, apex slightly thickened, septate, 
brown. 

On rich woodland soil, burnt soil, or much decayed wood, 
Aug.-Oct. Pennsylvania and Delaware. 

I have not seen this species in the fresh state and so can give 
no more information about it than can be gotten from herbarium 
material. It seems to agree in size, form, color, and certainly in 
the structure of the excipulum, with M. fusicarpa , the chief dif¬ 
ferences being found in the somewhat longer external hairs, and 
the shape and size of the spores. The latter are relatively much 
broader being elliptical or oblong-elliptical with rounded ends, 
rather than fusiform, and average 28-32/x long as against 36-41/4 
in M. fusicarpa. The largest spores of M. semitosta barely sur¬ 
pass the smallest ones of M. fusicarpa. 

Dr. Michener’s collections seem to be somewhat immature, 
but Mr. Ellis’s material seems to be better developed. The spores 
present agree perfectly in all the specimens. In the type of M. 
semitosta they measure 25-33x10-12^, while in that of P. hainesii 
they are 30-31x10-12/4. 

Material examined: Pennsylvania : Dr. Michener, n. 
3936; West Chester, Haines and Jefferies. 

Delaware : Wilmington, A. Commons. 

Botanical Department, Cornell University. 


NOTES FROM MYCOLOGICAL LITERATURE XVII. 

W. A. KELLERMAN. 

Symbiosis in the Genus Lolium, E. M. Freeman, Minn. 
Bot. Studies, 3:329-334, Oct. 18, 1904, admits that it cannot be 
affirmed without reservation that the entire life-history of L. 
temulentum is understood, but it can be affirmed that the yearly 
life-cycle is known, and that the parasite can live on indefinitely, 






Jan. 1906 ] Notes from Mycological Literahire 


33 


infecting generation after generation of Lolium plants without 
spore generation. Professor Freeman also says that the nature 
of the fungus still remains an open question. “I have previously 
enumerated the objections to the assignment of this fungus to 
the ergot-forming parasites and it certainly has little or no 
resemblances to the Uredineae. Nor has it any similarity to 
the Hyphomycetes and Pyrenomycetes of molded grains. The 
Ustilagineae seem to furnish the closest affinities.” 

Terminology of the spore-structures in tpie Uredine- 
ales, J. C. Arthur, Bot. Gaz. 39:219-222, March 1905, contains 
this suggestion relative to proposed designation: “The new terms 
consist of four words, with their derivatives, one for each of the 
four stages of uredineal fungi. For the sorus of the initial 
stage, usually designated by a cipher, and called spermogonium, 
pycnidium, etc., I propose pycnium; derivatives pycnial, pycnio- 
spores, etc. For the sorus of the first spore-stage, usually desig¬ 
nated by the Roman numeral I, and called aecidium, roestelia, 
peridermium, etc., I propose aeciurn; derivatives aecial, aecio- 
spore, etc. For the sorus of the second spore-stage, usually des¬ 
ignated by the Roman numeral II, and called uredosorus, etc., 
I propose uredinium (uredo) ; derivatives uredinicd, uredinio- 
spore or if preferred uredospore, etc. For the sorus of the third 
spore-stage, usually designated by the Roman numeral III, and 
called teleutosorus, I propose telium; derivatives teiial, telio - 
spores, etc.” 

The common Ithphallus impudicus, generally consid¬ 
ered to be a saprophyte only, has been found to be the cause of 
a destructive root rot of the vine in Hungary. According to the 
account given by Istvanffi (Ann. Inst. Cent. Ampelologique Roy. 
Hongrois 3: 1-55, 1904) the subterranean part of the stem is 
entwined by a network of the characteristic cord-like strands 
of mycelium of this fungus. From these, branches are sent into 
the interior of the stem. Small roots are totally destroyed by 
strands which penetrate them lengthwise, destroying all the 
tissues and leaving only the thin decaying cortex. In the older 
roots the cortex and phloem are totally destroyed, leaving only 
a mass of debris. The wood cylinder is last attacked, but this 
also is finally destroyed, leaving only scattered remnants of the 
vessels. [H. Hasselbring in Botanical Gazette.] 

Sexual Reproduction in the Rusts by A. H. Christ¬ 
man, Botanical Gazette, April 1905, can not be sufficiently indi¬ 
cated in a word but possibly the following quotation may show 
the trend of the article: “Maire’s conception that the nuclear 
fusion in the teleutospore is a mixis, was developed on the basis 
of the belief that no real cell fusion occurs in the life cycle of 
the rusts. It is at least a fair presumption that while no nuclear 
fusion occurs in the aecidium, the fusion of gamete cells described 


34 


Journal of Mycology 


[Vol. 12 


above presents all the essential features of sexual conjugations 
as found in other plants and animals. Superficially considered, 
Raciborski’s conception that the sexual union may be regarded 
as consisting of two phases, cell fusion and nuclear fusion, might 
seem to fit the conditions found in the rusts. I am inclined, how¬ 
ever, to accept Blackman’s conclusion that the fusion in the teleu- 
tospore has wholly to do with the reduction of the number of 
chromosomes.” 

Otto Jaap, Fungi Selecti Exsiccati, Serie 4, Ausgegeben 
im Oktober 1904, contains: (76) Taphridium umbelliferarum f. 
peucedani, (77) Taphria coerulescens, (78) Exoascus alni in- 
canae, (79) Mycosphaerella salicicola f. amygdalinae, (80) Ophi- 
ognomonia padi Jaap n. sp. on Prunus padus, (81) Diaporthe 
valida, (82) Aporia Jaapii Rehm n. sp. on Aspidium squamulo- 
sum, (83) Naevia Rehmii Jaap n. sp. on Juncus anceps, (84) Bri- 
ardia purpurascens, (85) Lachnum arundinis, (86) Desmazier- 
ella acicola, (87) Mitrula pusilla, (88) Urocystis Fischeri, 
(89) Setchellia punctiformis, (90) Melampsora amygdalinae, 
(91) Uromyces ranunculi-festucae, (92) Uromyces scirpi f. 
hippuridis-scirpi, (93) Uromyces scirpi f. glaucis-scirpi, (94) 
Puccinia angelicae-bistortae, (95) Rostrupia clymi, (96) Cy- 
phella gregaria, (97) Polyporus brumalis, (98) Diplodina obio- 
nis Jaap n. sp. on Obione portulacoides, (99) Ovularia vossiana, 
(100) Didymaria linariae; and Supplement: 1. Magnusiella po- 
tentillae, 2. Nectria episphaeria, 3. Septoria nigerrima. 

The effect of different Soils on the Development of the 
Carnation Rust is discussed by John L. Sheldon of the West Vir¬ 
ginia Agricultural Experiment Station, see Bot. Gaz. Sept. 1905. 
The experiments reported and conclusions drawn are interesting, 
but since they are of little or no taxonomic significance they must 
be passed without further comment — with the remark, however, 
that he found that the soils favorable for the host were also favor¬ 
able for the Rust. 

Roland Thaxter, A New American species of Wynnea, 
Botanical Gazette, April 1905. It was found by the author in 
1888, in Tennessee, growing on the ground in rich woods, in a 
single locality, where several clusters of its long bluntly pointed, 
rabbit-ear-shaped, dark brown apothecia were scattered in a lim¬ 
ited space, each cluster borne on a well defined stout stem, emerg¬ 
ing directly from the humus. The same thing was collected also 
in Ohio. Dr. Thaxter named the species Wynnea americana, 
illustrating the same by two plates — one showing the plant nat¬ 
ural size and the other showing asci, spores and other details. 

Minnesota Helvellineae, Daisy S. Hone, Minnesota 
Botanical Studies, 3:309-321, PI. XLVIII-LII, Oct. 18, 1904, 
is a list of 14 species, with newly written descriptions, all splen¬ 
didly illustrated on heliotype plates. 


Jan. 1906] Notes from Mycological Literature 


35 


Observations on Physalacria inflata (Schw.) Peck, 
by Jessie M. Polley, Minnesota Botanical Studies, 3:323-8, PL 
LIII, Oct. 18, 1904, treats of the rare and interesting fungus 
that was named Leotia inflata by Schweinitz in 1822. A new 
study of the plant from material collected at Detroit, Minnesota 
was made by Miss Polley. 

J. C. Arthur in Leguminous Rusts from Mexico (col¬ 
lected by E. W. D. Holway), published in the June No. of the 
Botanical Gazette, 1905, enumerates 37 species. Of these the 
following are new species: Uromyces rugosa, U. montanus, U. 
cologaniae, U. clitoriae, U. bauhiniicola, Calliospora holwayi, C. 
farlowii, C. diphysae, Uredo aeschynomenis, Revenelia lysilomae, 
R. gracilis, R. pithecolobii, R. inconspicua, and R. pulcherrima. 
A new genus of Rusts,namely, Calliospora is proposed, with 
the following diagnosis: Teleutosori arising from beneath the 
epidermis, soon naked; teleutospores 2-celled by transverse parti¬ 
tion, wall colored, with an external layer which swells in water; 
germ pores 2 in each cell, lateral. Aecidium and uredo wanting. 
Spermogonia arising from beneath the cuticle, conical. 

Contributions to the Biology of Rhizobia, IV: two 
coast Rhizobia of Vancouver Island, B. C., by Albert Schneider 
is published in the Botanical Gazette for August 1905, and relates 
to forms found in the beach vetch, Lathyrus maritimus Bigel., 
and the beach clover, Trifolium heterodon Gray. 

The V. Contribution to the Biology of Rhizobia by 
Albert Schneider, published in the Botanical Gazette for October 
1905, deals with the isolation and cultivation of Rhizobia in arti¬ 
ficial media. 

Rusts on Compositae from Mexico is an important con¬ 
tribution to the mycology of that region, by J. C. Arthur in the 
Botanical Gazette for September 1905. They are mostly the 
collections of Prof. E. W. D. Holway, the list containing 54 
species. The new species described are Coleosporium dahliae, 
C. steviae, Dietelia eupatorii, D. vernoniae, Uromyces senecioni- 
cola, Puccinia senecionicola, P. globulifera, P. gymnolomiae, P. 
caleae, P. axinophylli, P. noccae, P. jaliscana, P. diaziana, P. 
semi-insculpta, P. egregia, P. zaluzaniae, P. concinna, and P. 
paupercula. 

Fertilization in the Saprolegniales, by B. M. Davis, in 
the Botanical Gazette, January, 1905, is mainly a critical discus¬ 
sion of Trow’s reaffirmed conviction that a sexual act is present 
in the water molds, etc.; with then the remark that much more 
work must be done both on the Saprolegniales and Peronospo 
rales before some of the points suggested by Trow’s paper will 
be established. 


36 


Journal of Mycology 


[Vol. 12 


The Polyporaceae of North America — XII. A synop¬ 
sis of the white and bright-colored species. Bulletin of the 
Torrey Botanical Club, 32:469-493, September 1902. “The 
classification here adopted is acknowledged to be imperfect and 
artificial, but it is hoped that it will lead to something better 
when our knowledge of the plants treated is more complete.’’ 
Synopses are given as in previous installments and the treatment 
is similar in other respects. The new genera proposed are: Irci- 
piporus (type Irpex mollis B. & C.) ; Dendrophagus (type Poly- 
porus colossus Fr.) ; Rigidiporus (type Polyporus micromegas 
Mont.) ; Earliella (type Earliella cubensis Murrill n. sp.) ; Cuba- 
inyces (type Polyporus cubensis Mont.) ; Coriolellus (type Tra- 
metes sepium Berk.) ; Microporellus (type Polyporus dealbatus 
B. & C.) ; Flaviporellus (type Polyporus splitgerberi Mont.) ; 
Aurantiporus (type polyporus alboluteus E. & E.) ; Aurantiporus 
(type Polyporus pilotae Schw.) ; Pycnoporellus (type Polyporus 
fibrillosus Karst.) ; and Phaeolopsis (type Polyporus verae-crucis 
Berk.). 

Frederick LeRoy Sargent’s article Lichenology for 
Beginners III, published in the Bryologist, Sept. 1905, is illus¬ 
trated by numerous figures; some of the subjects fully discussed 
are the chief forms of the thallus, the principal forms of apothe- 
cia, and the spores. 

What to note in the Macroscopic study of Lichens II, 
by Bruce Fink, published in the Bryologist, September 1905, is 
treated under the following subheads: Variation in Lichens, the 
Apothecium, the Disk, the Exciple, Position of the Apothecia, 
Stipes and Podetia, Rhizoids and Cilia, Some other structures 
and Conclusion. 

A Note regarding the Discharge of Spores of Pleu- 
rotus ostreatus, by C. C. Harmer, is given in the Torreya for 
August 1905. Fie says that a large plant left in the room one 
night, exposed to strong morning sunlight caused the spores to 
arise from the plant like tiny spirals of smoke or steam, to the 
height of two or three feet, making a very strange sight. 

The Genus Cortinariuss a preliminary Study, by Cal¬ 
vin Henry Kauffman, in the Bulletin of the Torrey Botanical 
Club, June, 1905, is a partial monograph based on thorough study 
extending through a period of three years. A key is given for 
the Cortinarii in the vicinity of Ithaca. The subheads of the 
article are as follows: Introduction, Historical, General consider¬ 
ations, Generic description, Key to Subgenera, Structure of the 
pileus and stem, Gills, Spores, Habitat, Identification, and Species. 
Under the latter a key is given and seven new species described. 

A New Polyporoid Genus from South America (called 
Piiylloporia) by William A. Murrill, is noted in Torreya for 


Jan. 1906] Notes from Mycological Literature 


37 


September 1904. It is the only species known which occurs para¬ 
sitic on leaves. Looked at from above, the author says in speak¬ 
ing of the leaves, the host appears to be attacked by a leaf- 
parasite and it is quite surprising to find on the lower surface 
the sporophores of one of the Polvporaceae. The pileus is 
5-8 mm. in diameter and 0.2-1 mm, thick. 

Tycho Vestergren, Monographia der auf der Legumi- 

NOSEN-GATTUNG BAUHINIA VORKOMMENDEN UrOMYCES-ArTEN, 
in Arkif foer Botanik, K. Svenska Vetenskaps-akademien I 
Stockholm, Band 4, No. 15, is an important monograph, the sub¬ 
heads being Morphologische Uebersicht, Verwandtschaftsver- 
haeltnisse, Uebersicht der Species and Diagnosen der species. 
The spores of 17 species included in the paper, each fully de¬ 
scribed, are illustrated on two lithographic plates. Eleven of 
the species are new. Most of the species are from South Amer¬ 
ica (one only occurs in Europe) but a few also have been found 
in Mexico and the West Indies. 

A new Genus of Ascomycetous Fungi by Nathaniel Llyon 
Gardner forms vol. 2, No. 6, pp. 169-18, pi. 18, University of 
California publications, Botany, issued July 27, 1905. It is based 
on Sphaeria (Hypocrea) setchellii Hark., a species that was pub¬ 
lished some years ago. The generic name proposed is Nigro- 
sphaeria; its scant mycelium penetrates the subhymenial tissues 
of the host — in the case investigated this being the saprohytic 
Pseudhydnotria Harknessii, which grows in sandy soil. Both 
host and parasite are ascomycetous fungi. 

The Polyporaceae of North America — X. Agaricus, 
Lenzites, Cerrena and Favolus, by William Alphonso Murrill, 
Bulletin of the Torrey Botanical Club, 32: 83-103, February 1905, 
treats of plants with variable daedaleoid or lamelloid hymenium 
and light-colored context and spores. The author says they 
recognize none of the ordinary specific or even generic limita¬ 
tions of the group and that if they are amenable to ordinary 
methods of cultivation, they would surpass Oenothera in supply¬ 
ing most excellent examples of mutation. The treatment of the 
subject is similar to that in previous installments and needs no 
further elucidation. It might be remarked that it is not altogether 
unappalling to some botanists to see the name Agaricus trans- 
' ferred to our common Daedalea quercina — and whether Mr. 
Murrill’s nomenclature and many new genera of the Polypora¬ 
ceae will be accepted by the older workers remains to be seen. 

Organisms on the Surface of Grain with special ref¬ 
erence to Bacillus coli, by Haven Metcalf, Science, N. S., 
22: 439-441, 6 Oct. 1905, is a preliminary note on work done in 
the Piedmont region and the Rice-belt of South Carolina, in 
1903-4. Some of the conclusions are as follows: An immense but 


38 


Journal of Mycology 


[Vol. 12 


variable number and variety of micro-organisms were normally 
present on the surface of flowers, fruits and leaves. These were 
different in different localities, and different in successive years in 
the same locality, and showed no constant association with the host 
plants studied. . . . The most constantly present organisms were 
certain yeasts; in greatest number and variety on the peach, 
asparagus and iris; bue yet characteristically present on the cere¬ 
als. . . . Bacteria giving the standard reactions of the colon 
group were found in thirteen out of sixteen rice fields examined, 
five of the eight wheat fields and all of the oat fields. All three 
peach orchards and both asparagus patches exhibited coli forms 
in both flower and fruit; but none were found on either flower 
or fruit of Iris verna. 

A PRELIMINARY NOTE ON CLOVER DISEASES IN TENNESSEE 
by Samuel M. Bain and Samuel H. Essary, Science, N. S., 22: 
503, October 20, 1905, refers to the prevalence, greater or less, 
of Uromyces trifolii, Pseudopeziza trifolii, and Macrosporium 
sarcinaeforme but the author says: The most destructive disease 
thus far found is what appears to be an undescribed species of 
Colletotrichum. In its general appearance this disease very 
closely simulates the anthracnose of clover (Stengelbrenner ), 
described by Mehner and Kirchner and by the latter attributed 
to the attacks of Gloeosporium caulivorum n. sp. 

Two CONIDIA-BEARING FUNGI, CUNNINGITAMELLA AND 
Thamnocephalis n. gen., by A. F. Blakeslee, (with plate), is 
the first article in the September No. of the Botanical Gazette, 
1905. The first species discussed is C. echinulata Thaxter, sel¬ 
dom reported, and the second is Thamnocephalis quadrupedata, 
growing in a gross dung cluture on fresh sphagum. The new 
genus is characterized as follows: Thamnocephalis. — Vegetative 
hyphae fine, continuous, anastomosing. Fructifications erect, 
consisting of a main stalk supported above the substratum by 
stout rhizoidal props and bearing a bushy crown of subdichoto- 
mously branched fertile hyphae terminated by sterile branches. 
Spores solitary, borne on the surface of spherical heads. Heads 
borne at the apex of short lateral stalks which arise at nodes 
from opposite sides of the fertile hyphae at right angles to their 
planes of branching. 

Chroolepus aureus a Lichen, is what Albert Schneider 
maintains in the August (1905) No. of the Bulletin of the Torrey 
Botanical Club. Material collected at Vancouver Island presented 
opportunity for the study, and here is his conclusion: There 
seems to. be little doubt that the network described represents a 
fungus symbiotically associated with the alga Chroolepus aureus. 
This association appears to be sufficiently constant to warrant 
placing this structure, heretofore classed as an alga, with the 
class Lichenes. The fungal symbiont does not appear to develop 


Jan. 1906] Notes from Mycological Literature 


39 


spores or any other special structures found with the fungal 
symbionts of the majority of lichens. 

Annales Mycologici, vol. Ill, No. 3, June, 1905, contains: 
Bubak, Fr., Beitrag zur Kenntniss einiger Uredineen; Rehm, 
Ascomycetes exs. Fasc. 34; Sydow, Mycotheca germanica Fasc. 
VII (No. 301-350) ; Rick, J., Pilze aus Rio grande do Sul; Sal¬ 
mon, Ernest S., The Erysiphaceae of Japan, II; Lederer, Michael, 
Die Flechtenflora der Umgebung von Amberg; Neue Literatur; 
Referate und kritische Besprechungen. 

Annales Mycologici, vol. Ill, No. 4., Aug. 1905, contains 
the following: McAlpine, D., A new genus of Uredineae — Uro- 
mycladium; Hohnel, Franz v., Mycologische Fragmente; Vueille- 
min, P., Identite des genres Meria et Hartigiella; Guilliermond, 
A., Remarques sur la Karyokinese des Ascomycetes; Cavara, Fr., 
Causeries mycologiques; Neue Literatur; Referate und kritische 
Besprechungen. 

Hedwigia, Band XLIV, Heft 6, 25 Aug. 1905, has for 
mycologists the four articles: P. Dietel, Uber die Arten der Gat- 
tung Phragmidium II; P. Magnus, Uber die Gattung, zu der 
Rhizopodium Dicksonii Wright gehort; Fr. Bubak und J. E. 
Rabat, Mykologische Beitrage III; P. Magnus, Zwei parasitische 
Harpographium-Arten und der Zusammenhang einiger Stilbeen 
mit Ovularia oder Ramularia. 

Hedwigia, Band XLIV, Heft 2, 31 Jan. 1905, has the fol¬ 
lowing mycological papers: P. Hennings, Fungi amazonici IV, 
a cl. Ernesto Ule collecti; Zoltan von Szabo, Uber eine neue 
Hyphomyceten-Gattung; P. Dietel, Uber die Arten der Gattung 
Phragmidium (Anfang). 

Hedwigia, Band XLIV, Heft 3, 13 Mar. 1905, contains 
mycological articles, for example: P. Dietel, Uber die Arten der 
Gattung Phragmidium (Schluss) ; Jos. Stefan, Beitrag zur 
Kenntniss von Collybia racemosa Pers.; P. Hennings, Einige 
schadliche parasitische Pilze auf exotischen Orchideen unserer 
Gewachshauser. 

The Report of the Botanist of the Connecticut Agri¬ 
cultural Experiment Station for the year 1904, part IV, 
pp. 311-384, pi. XVIII-XXXVII, issued May 1905, is a discus¬ 
sion by G. P. Clinton under three heads as follows (1) Notes 
on Fungous Diseases, etc., for 1904; (2) Downy Mildew or 
Blight, Peronoplasmopora cubensis (B. & C.) Clint.; (3) Downy 
Mildew, or Blight, Phytophthora infestans (Mont.) DeBy. of 
Potato. Attention is called especially to the two last articles 
which are exhaustive. Dr. Clinton takes up the history, sys¬ 
tematic classification, life cycle, spraying experiments and con¬ 
clusions ; also for the Melon blight a bibliographical list of all 
the more important articles on the subject. 


Journal of Mtcologt 


A Periodical Devoted to North American Mycology. Issued Bi¬ 
monthly; January , March , May , July , September and November. 
Price , $2.00 per Year. To Foreign Subscribers , $2.25. Edited and 

Published by ^ ^ KELLERMAN, PH. £)., COLUMBUS , Otf/0. 


EDITOR'S NOTES. 

The matter of concise and uniform citation in connection 
with publication of scientific matter is an affair of such impor¬ 
tance and as such so universally recognized that no comment 
further need be made here; yet do not Periodicals have a duty 
to perform in the way of facilitating this matter? Are not one 
or two scientific magazines yet direlict? 


These items should invariably be given as a running head 
line, in addition to page number; on the left page the Name of 
the Journal, and the Volume Number; on the right, the date 
(immediately opposite and adjacent to the vol. no.), and the 
Topic of the article (the author’s name may be prefixed if de¬ 
sired). If it is a New Series, or Second or Third Series, etc., 
the proper abbreviations should be prefixed to the Volume No. 
The Serial No. of the issue should not be given in the running 
head lines. _ 

Every periodical should (and practically all do) have a 
cover. This is very convenient for very mnay purposes — and 
one of these is the conspicuous display of the Serial No. of the 
issue. It is a convenience to the librarian who keeps periodicals 
in order for patrons, and no less to the person consulting the file. 
But no reference to the No. should be included in an ordinary 
citation of literature. The volume and page are ordinarily suffi¬ 
cient but the date is sometimes advantageous in looking up a 
reference, though the less the searcher has to hold in mind while 
hunting the better. We repeat: The Serial No. should not be 
given on any page of a scientific publication, but should be con¬ 
spicuous on the cover, the latter to be discarded when the Nos. 
are bound into a volume. 


Professor Schaffner has kindly seen this No. through the 
press during the absence of the editor. 


Journal of Mycology , Vol. 12, pp. 1-40, Issued Mar. 8, 1906. 








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each . 10 

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Issued in fascicles of 20 specimens each. Ten 
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illustrated, 24 Nos. per year. Vol. II, 1904, 

Vol. Ill, 1905, each 50 cents; bound in cloth, 75 
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New Genera of Fungi. Published since 1900; the 
original descriptions reproduced with full cita¬ 
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since 1900, with the original descriptions. 5° 

Index to Journal of Mycology, volumes 1-10. 75 

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Volume 12 , No. 82 March igo6 


Journal of Mycology 


TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Kellerman — Obituary, J. B. Ellis. 41 

Bates —Rust Notes for 1905 . 45 

f : ': Saccardo — Micromycetes Americani Novi. 47 

Bubak — Neue Pilze aus Nord America.. 52 

Bessey —Dilophospora Alopecuri. 57 

Sumstine — Pleurotus Hollandianus Sp. Nov. 59 

Sumstine— Note on Wynnes Americana . 59 

Ricker — Second Supplement to New Genera. * 60 

Kellerman — Index to North American Mycology.. 67 

Kellerman — Notes from Mycological Riterature XVIII. . 80 

Shear —American Mycological Society. 87 

Editor’s Notes. 88 


IV. A. Kellerman, Ph. D. 

Professor of Botany, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 


Entered as Second Class Matter, Post-office at Columbus, Ohio. 


PRESS OF F. J. HEER, COLUMBUS, OHIO. 

























Cost of Separates. 


Contributors who desire separates of their articles will 
receive the same at cost, approximately as follows: 


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Journal of Mycology 

VOLUME 12-MARCH 1906 


TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Kellerman — Obituary, J. B. Ellis. . 41 

Batbs — Rust Notes for 1905 . 45 

Saccardo — Micromycetes Americani Novi. 47 

Bubak — Neue Pilze aus Nord America. 52 

Bessey — Dilophospora Alopecuri. 57 

Sumstine — Pleurotus Hollandianus Sp. Nov. 59 

Sumstine — Note on Wynnea Americana. 59 

Ricker — Second Supplement to New Genera. 60 

Kellerman — Index to North American Mycology. 67 

Kellerman — Notes from Mycological Literature XVIII. 80 

Shear — American Mycological Society. 87 

Editor’s Notes. 88 


OBITUARY-JOB BICKNELL ELLIS. 

W. A. KELLERMAN. 

Mr. J. B. Ellis, one of the former editors of this Journal, 
passed away December 30, 1905. When the present editor pro¬ 
posed to publish a Journal of Mycology in 1885 Mr. Ellis heartily 
joined in the enterprise and agreed to furnish practically all the 
copy for the unpretentious periodical. Though three names are 
printed as editors on the title page of the first four volumes it 
was Mr. Ellis alone who furnished most of the articles and gave 
the character to the Journal. It was then, as it is now, largely 
taxonomic and devoted to the American Fungi. The pages record 
incidentally a wonderful expansion of American Mycology during 
the past two decades. Mr. Ellis did more than any other botanist 
during the period of his mycological activity toward making 
known the parasitic fungi of the United States. The Journal of 
Mycology was an avenue of publication not only for his many 
species; but the monographs published in the first four volumes 
of the Journal made it possible for many botanists to undertake 
the study of the parasitic species. We estimate highly the influ¬ 
ence this exerted on the development of American Mycology. 
His multitudes of new species were of course not all published in 
this periodical — his contributions appearing in great number in 
the Botanical Gazette, Torrey Bulletin, American Naturalist, Pro- 





















42 


Journal of Mycology 


[Vol. 12 


ceedings of the Philadelphia Academy and elsewhere. His early 
work in connection with Dr. M. C. Cooke of England, a veteran 
still living, appeared in Grevillea. This period, 1875 to 1879, 
might be regarded perhaps as Mr. Ellis’ apprenticeship — and 
surely a good foundation was laid. Subsequently the herbarium 
he had already built up, and the mycological library then accumu¬ 
lated, though not large, furnished him with the equipment for 
independent work. He did not make extended collecting trips 
over the country; but he brought together from a small area an 
immense number of new fungi; and specimens from young and 
enthusiastic collectors and incipient botanists poured in upon him. 
Over this he worked with great diligence. His descriptions are 
of course not always full, his knowledge of some things he pub¬ 
lished was scant, but who could or did do better! Pioneers can 
not do the critical work that is possible to the well trained student 
who has the advantage of all the facilities and appliances later 
developed. Perhaps not more to his contributions in print than 
to his work on exsiccata is due the impetus he gave to the study 
of mycology in this country for the quarter of a century during 
the period of his greatest activity. He began his Fungi Nova- 
Caesariensis about 1878, but soon changed the title to North 
American Fungi, and “N. A. F.” can well be regarded as classic 
in American Mycology. A second set was begun later called 
Fungi Columbiani. The large number of subscribers both at home 
and abroad shows the high estimate placed on these exsiccata. 
The contributions of various young botanists over the country 
assisted materially of course in the issuance of so many centuries, 
though one needs merely to glance at the list of specimens to see 
what a large number Mr. Ellis collected with his own hands. Men¬ 
tion must be specially made of the personal assistance given by 
him to so many correspondents — those who were beginning the 
study of fungi, especially the parasitic species. Even with the 
pressure of the work entailed by undertaking to report on such 
material sent to him, never was one seeking help denied assist¬ 
ance ; an answer was sure to come by the next mail. Recognition 
therefore can justly be accorded for the indirect as well as the 
direct part Mr. Ellis took in the development of Mycology in this 
country. 

Great industry on his part and the activity of many persons 
throughout the country enabled him to accumulate a vast her¬ 
barium rich in type specimens. This was purchased a few years 
ago by the New York Botanical Garden. 

No list will here be given of the numerous contributions pub¬ 
lished by J. B. Ellis, all the articles being fresh in the memory of 
the working mycologists, but special mention must be made of his 
important work of 793 pages and 41 full page plates bearing this 
self-explanatory title: The North American Pyrenomycetes, a 
contribution to Mycologic Botany, by J. B. Ellis and B. M. Ever- 


March 1906] Obituary —Job Bicknell Eilis 


43 


hart, with original illustrations by F. W. Anderson; published by 
Ellis and Everhart, Newfield, New Jersey, 1892. 

It is interesting to note the beginning of a correspondence 
with the mycologist Ravenel of South Carolina, which perhaps 
influenced him to work along the line he thereafter so conspicu¬ 
ously followed. It is said by one who wrote a sketch of his life 
a few years ago that Mr. Ellis saw by chance a notice of “Fungi 
Caroliniani exsiccati,” the first thing of the kind ever issued in 
America. He at once wrote to the author of that work, and the 
correspondence was permanent — interrupted only by Raveneks 
death. The first letter was written in 1857 and doubtless this 
friendship was one of the incentives to Mr. Ellis’ persistent and 
fruitful labors in the mycological field. 

Allusion has just been made to the sketch of Mr. Ellis’ life, 
prepared by Mr. Anderson a few years ago and published in the 
Botanical Gazette. The latter spent much time at the home of 
Mr. Ellis while making the drawings for the North American 
Pyrenomycetes. Mr. Anderson was a most promising and en¬ 
thusiastic mycologist taken away unfortunately when just be¬ 
ginning a career of great usefulness, and I consider it a tribute 
to him as well as to Mr. Ellis that I can select from his sketch of 
Mr. Ellis the salient points in the several following paragraphs: 

J. B. Ellis was born in Potsdam, N. Y., Jan. 21, 1829. In¬ 
dustrious over his books when not at work on his father’s farm 
he was prepared at the age of sixteen to teach a winter-school,, 
for which service he received ten dollars a month and “boarded 
around.” This doubtless well-earned salary was paid partly in 
cash (five dollars) and partly in grain, the last of the grain being 
turned over to him, says Mr. Anderson, just twenty years after¬ 
ward. In June, 1851, Mr. Ellis graduated from Union College. 
While a student here he paid some attention to botany. He taught 
at various schools, but no positon seemed to be very permanent. 
His interest in plants continued unabated. In 1853, while a 
classical teacher at Bartlett’s Boarding School in Poughkeepsie 
during two years, he collected plants on Saturdays and, said he, 
“on Sunday, too, if he could steal away, for Mr. Bartlett was 
very pious.” In the fall of 1856 he became principal of the Can¬ 
ton Academy and in 1863 went into one of the public schools of 
Pottsdam village. During the war of the rebellion he was in the 
United States Navy. At the close of the war he settled at New¬ 
field, New Jersey, where he resided until his death. 

It was not, however, until 1878 that Mr. Ellis began devot¬ 
ing his whole time to the study of Fungi. With characteristic 
modesty he refrained from attending scientific meetings, so that 
practically all of the botanists and many amateurs, though they 
know his name as of an old friend, never met him personally. Mr. 
Anderson says that with considerable quiet humor he tells how 
that when he was teaching at Mr. Bartlett’s School, he deter- 


44 


Journal of Mycology 


[Vol. 12 


mined on three different occasions to go down on the boat to New 
York and stay there several days to “do the city” and each time 
returned home on the first train he could get, suffering with a 
violent headache caused by the excitement of the trip and the 
noisy bustle of the city. In spite of ill health he attained an age 
not far from three score and ten. He was industrious and studi¬ 
ous ; a good linguist as well as botanist; of sensitive nature; 
always practiced the strictest simplicity and regularity in his daily 
life. ' 

The hundreds of new species by Ellis, very many tagged E. 
& E., also many by E. & M., E. & Hk., E. & Hoi., E. & Hals., 
E. & Barth., E. & Dear., E. & Fairm., E. & Morg., E. & Lang., 
E. & K., also still other initials, testify to Mr. Ellis’ activity. 
Then the long list of species designated as “ellisii” and “ellisiana” 
by other botanists witnesses the high appreciation of his services 
to systematic mycology. The genus “Ellisiella” was also named 
in his honor by Saccardo. Dr. Farlow’s bibliography on North 
American Fungi shows a long list of articles by J. B. Ellis, also 
many signed Ellis & Everhart, Ellis & Harkness, Ellis & Holway, 
Ellis & Kellerman, Ellis & Martin; more recently still other 
names have been in the same manner associated. Mr. Ellis was 
also honored by important foreign societies, for example in July, 
1878, he was elected a corresponding member of the Academy 
of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia. In August, 1882, he was 
elected a corresponding member of the Cryptogamic Society of 
Scotland and in December of the same year was elected a cor¬ 
responding member of “Die Kaiserlich-Konigliche Zoologisch- 
Botanische Gessellschaft in Wien.” 

Mr. Wm. C. Stevenson, Jr., an intimate and appreciative 
friend of Mr. Ellis for many years, has kindly furnished me the 
following statement: 

“The first time I had the pleasure of meeting Mr. J. B. Ellis was 
in April, 1873. We previously had corresponded on Mycological subjects 
and exchanged some few specimens, but at the time mentioned being in 
the neighborhood of Newfield took the opportunity of calling on him. I 
received a warm cordial welcome and was soon in his study examining 
some of his recent finds'. The limited time at my disposal passed only 
too rapidly, but it was the beginning of a close, personal friendship, 
which lasted until his death. It grew stronger with each recurring year, 
and I had an opportunity of learning his nature, such as few of his other 
correspondents had. 

His kind, genial open heartedness was always a strong point in 
his character, and no true student of the Fungi ever had cause for 
regret if he acted with a tithe of the confidence and fairness which was 
shown by him. 

He was willing to divide honors in his public work, which while it 
for the time placed another in an equal light with himself, yet in the 
end only tended to brighten and enhance his own standing among the 
leaders in his chosen field. He certainly acted on the principle that it 
was “better to give than receive,” and in the end it bore fruit to his 
-credit far above what he could have expected. 


March 1906] 


Rust Notes for 1905 


45 


The many tramps we had together in the fields and woods around 
Newfield were particularly gratifying to me, as I had on such occasions 
opportunity to see how unbiased and open he was in his thoughts and 
dealings. They were, so to speak, academic treats to me, the pupil learn¬ 
ing from the master who was always patient and willing to impart his. 
knowledge and overlook shortcomings on the part of his companion. In 
1884 the British Association for the Advancement of Science met in 
Canada, and the American Association in Philadelphia. It was arranged 
that a joint meeting of the botanists of the two associations should be 
held at the Academy of Natural Sciences in Philadelphia on the evening 
of September 8. Mr. Ellis was present at that joint meeting. Here for 
the first time he met scores of workers in the botanical and mycological 
fields whom he had known by name and through correspondence. It 
was a great treat to him, and he often rehearsed to me the pleasure that 
evening gave to him. It seemed to add new spirit and enthusiasm to his 
future work and plans. 

His visits to my home were looked forward to by me as special 
treats, and my expectations were always more than realized. His strong 
cardinal points as I saw and knew him were honesty and charity in the 
fullest degree.” 

Very fitly this short account of the life and work of Mr. 
Ellis may conclude with a reference to his devoted wife, who 
ceased her work some years ago. The statement I take entire 
from Science, Aug. 11, 1899: 

In the death of Mrs. Arvilla J. Ellis, of Newfield, New Jersey, on 
July 18, 1899, there passed away another of those patient workers to 
whose fidelity science owes so much. Not known as a botanist, not a 
member of a scientific society, not the author of a scientific paper, she 
nevertheless contributed, more to the advancement of our knowledge of 
the fungi than many of those whose names are frequently appended to 
scientific articles in the journals. Many years ago she began aiding her 
husband, Mr. J. B. Ellis, in the arduous labor of preparing and mount¬ 
ing the specimens for the ‘North American Fungi’ and later for the 
‘Fungi Columbiani,’ and with her own hands bound the books in which 
these were delivered to subscribers. Had it not been for her help the 
first of these great distributions — numbering 3,600 specimens — would 
have been suspended early in its history, and the second — numbering 
1,400 specimens — would never have come into existence. To her deft 
fingers, which wrought so patiently, botanical science is indebted for 
the more than two hundred thousand specimens of the fungi which Mr v 
Ellis distributed to the botanists of the world. 


RUST NOTES FOR 1905 . 

J. M. BATES. 

Finding the aecidium of Pticcinia subnitens growing on sev¬ 
eral species of Chenopodiaceae, Cruciferae, and on Cleome serru- 
lata, I determined to test it on Monolepis Nuttalliana. The cul¬ 
ture was made April 6. May 12 several ripe aecidia were found, 
but many more on Roripa sinuata which grew with it and on 
Bursa bursa-pastoris. It is very nearly immune. Cultures made 
on Sophia incisa showed more affiliation than those on Bursa, 
some of which failed entirely. Lepidium apetalum shows itself a 


Journal of Mycology 


46 


[Vol. 12 


good host. Culture on Chenopodium hybridum failed; probably 
made too late. It has been made earlier this year. 

April 18th I brought down from Orleans Puccinia poculi- 
formis on Elymus canadensis to test on a hedge of Berberis vul¬ 
garis. It looked very strong, but when the aecidia appeared, I 
could find no more near the culture than fifty feet away, and but 
little more than the year before without culture. Nor could I find 
any such Puccinia growing within several blocks of the hedge, 
ithough abundant on Hordeum jubatum and other hosts a mile 
south. 

May 14th I made a culture of Puccinia amphigena, Calamo- 
vilfa longifolia, on the only plant of Smilax hispida found in three 
years, in this region. It grows a mile away from the grass, and, 
the year before, had no secidium on it. The winter before my 
experiment, it had been cut to the ground. The fresh shoots were 
therefore in fine condition for this late experiment. I had no 
chance to view it until June 10, when I found the whole plant 
covered with secidia. As the Puccinia grows in abundance miles 
away from any species of Smilax in Cherry Co. there can be no 
doubt that it has the same faculty as Puccinia poculiformis of 
living over without the first stage. The appearance of this rust 
at the late date of May 14 is specially interesting. I hope to test 
it much earlier this year. 

June 14, three miles west of Red Cloud, I found one plant of 
Oenothera biennis, about 15 inches high, with ripe secidia cover¬ 
ing the under side of the lowest leaves and unripe ones follow¬ 
ing the leaves as they developed to the very summit. As Aecidium 
Peckii comes in distinct sori, I saw that I had something new, 
and gathered all that was fit. Looking then for the clue, I found 
Carex Pennsylvania growing all around it and uredo in abund¬ 
ance within three feet, growing scarcer as you departed from 
the source, until at four feet there was none at all. The patch of 
grass land on which it grew had been burned over, the previous 
winter, so that I found No. Ill, though of course some of it had 
escaped. I collected a set of the uredo. June 20 I was in 
Sargent, Custer Co., and found the same rust on Oenothera 
biennis, Oe. sinuata and Carex Pennsylvania, in vacant town lots. 
Four miles out, I found it again, and the next day in Arcadia 
again. Dr. Bessey says he found it once in Iowa on Oe. biennis 
and Prof. Holway reports the same. Nov. 3, I was able to collect 
a set of III. on Carex Pennsylvania at Red Cloud, and since 
then have made collections of same at Sargent. The III. looks 
like a pale weak uredo, but Prof. Holway reports it as a good 
teleutosporic form and a new species. 

I have given these details, because it seems to me that the 
relationship between the two or three hosts is abundantly estab¬ 
lished. Nevertheless “to make assurance doubly sure,” I have 


March 1906 ] Micro?)iycetes Americani Novi 


4 ? 

sent material to Dr. Arthur and have made several cultures myself 
on different hosts of the Onagraceae. 

Red Cloud, Nebraska. 


MICROMYCETES AMERICANI NOVI. 

Lecti a ell. Doctoribus C. E. Fairman et S. Bonansea 
Auctore P. A. Saccardo. 

Fungilli aliquot novi, qui hie describuntur, lecti et missi 
fuerunt a viris prselaudatis. Cl. Doct. Charles E. Fairman eos 
decerpsit prope Lyndonville, Orleans County, N. Y., non longe a 
iacu Ontario et notis nonnullis declaravit. Cl. Doct. Silvius Bo- 
tiansea Italus, sed nunc Mexici incola, mycetes suos collegit in 
Monte del Disierto in Tenancingo, in quo districtu zona temperata 
calidae jungitur. 

I. 

Mycetes boreali-americani a Doct. Fairman lecti 

A. Teleomycetae. 

1. Hypoxylon pumilio Sacc. et Fairm. sp. n. — Minutum, 
extus e roseo isabellinum, breviter effusum, rarius in acervulos 
exiguos i mm. latos limitatum, plerumque 4-6 mm. long. 2 mm. 
lat., applanatum v. vix convexulum; peritheciis unistratosis perexi- 
guis, globulosis vix 200 fx diam., medietate superiori discretis, hinc 
prominulis, extus tenuiter roseo-pruinosulis, intus nigris, ostiolo 
brevissimo lato obtuso, minutissime pertuso, fere deterso hinc nigri- 
cante, 90-100 /x diam., ascis cylindricis deorsum sensim tenuato- 
stipitatis, apice rotundatis, 130x6-8, parte sporif. 70-80 jx longa, 
octosporis; paraphysibus filiformibus ascos multo superantibus; 
sporidiis oblique monostichis, ovato-oblongis, inaequilateris, 12- 
14 x 5.5-6, fuligineis, crasse 2 guttatis, rarius guttulis inaequalibus 
3-4 foetis. 

Hab. in ligno putri in silvis pr. Lyndonville, N. Y., Sept. 1905. 

Nonnihil affine H. nectriodeo Sacc. et Fr. et H. nectroidi 
Speg. a quibis mox dignoscitur peritheciis applanato-effusis, multo 
minoribus. Stroma, cui perithecia insituntur est maculiforme, 
pariter roseo-isabellinum. Species pertinent ad subgenus Placo- 
jcylon Sect. a. 

2. Xylaria brevipes Sacc. et Fairm. sp. n. — Stromatibus 
solitariis v. rarius binatis, lignicolis, cylindraceis, basi rotundatis 
paullo crassioribus, sursum sensim tenuatis, brevissime stipitatis, 
ob ostiola acutiuscula vix prominula asperulis, glabris, opace 
nigris, intus candidis, totis 2.5 cm. longis, 3 mm. diam.; stipite 
crassiusculo, cylindraceo, longitrorsum sulcato, glabro, nigro, 1-3 



48 


Journal of Mycology 


[Vol. 12 


mm. long., 1-1.5 mm. cr., peritheciis immersis, globosis, mono- 
stichis, 250-300 ix diam., nigris ; ascis cylindraceis longe sensimque 
tenuato-stipitatis parte sporif. 70 x 5.5-6; sporidiis recte v. oblique 
monostichis, ellipsoideis, inaequilateris, utrinque obtusatis, 11- 
12x4-4.5, fuligineis. 

Hab. ad truncos dejectos pr. Lyndonville, N. Y., 1905. 

Pertinet ad subgen. Xyloglossa Sect. b. Habitu aliquid ac- 
cedit ad X. corniformem et X. cupressiformem sed characteribus 
variis recedit. 

3. Erostella transversa Sacc. et Fairm. sp. n. — Perithe¬ 
ciis inter librum et periderma evolutis et rima transversali cras- 
siuscule marginata circ. 2 mm. longa erumpentibus sed non emer- 
gentibus, in quoque acervulo 4-6, globulosis, 500-750/x diam., peri- 
dermate secedente subliberis et saepe collapso-concavis, glabris, 
nigris, collis brevissimis, ostiolis obtusis; ascis clavatis, sub- 
sessilibus sed deorsum tenuatis, apice rotundatis, 44-48 x 5.5-6, 
octosporis; paraphysibus filiformibus, asco multo longioribus 
minute guttulosis; sporidiis distichis allantoideis, leviter curvis 
8-9 x 2.5, perfecte hyalinis. 

Hab. in cortice Betulae sp. in silvis pr. Lyndonville, Sept. 
1905. 

Ab Erostella vasculosa Sacc. et E. ambigua (Berl.) Sacc. 
differt sporidiis brevioribus, angustoribus, peritheciis rimose 
transverseque erumpentibus, etc. Cl. Berlese anno 1900 (Ic. fung. 
Ill, p. 9) instituit gen. Togninia quod essentialiter congruit cum 
subgen. Erostella (Calosphaeriae) a me condito anno 1882 
(Syll. I, p. 101) quod ergo praeferri debet. 

4. Rosellina elaeospora Sacc. et Fairm. sp. n. — Perithe¬ 
ciis late et dense gregariis, superficialibus, globosis, glabris, circ. 
\ mm. diam., papillatis, senio papilla amissa perforatis, carbo- 
naceis, nigris; ascis tereti-elongatis, deorsum tenuato-stipitatis, 
60 x 7-8 \± octosporis, filiformi-paraphysatis; sporidiis oblique 
monostichis, elliptico-navicularibus, inaequilateris, utrinque obtu¬ 
satis, 13-15 x 4.5-5 jjl , rarius usque ad 16 x 5.6 /x, fumoso-oblivaceis, 
2-3 guttulatis v. granulosis. 

Hab. ad truncos putrescentes dejectos in silvis pr. Lyndon¬ 
ville, N. Y., Sept. 1905. 

Praesertim sporidiis fumoso-olivaceis dignoscitur. 

5. Otthiella Fairmani Sacc. sp. n. — Peritheciis in 
acervulos minutos, suborbiculares, 1 mm. diam., erumpenti-super- 
ficialibus, in quoque acervulo paucis (5-7), globosis, subinde 
paullulum connatis, non v. obtuse papillatis, nigris, glabris, 400 
fx diam.; ascis tereti-elongatis, utrinque tenuatis, subsessilibus, 
ITO-130X 13-15/x, octosjx)ris ; paraphysibus filiformibus, copiosis; 
sporidiis distichis, oblongo-fusoideis, curvulis, utrinque acutulis, 
media septatis et denique constritulis, 30-32 x 5.5-6 /X, hyalinis 
v. dilutissime ochraceis, articulo super, saepe paullo crassiore. 




March 1906 ] Micromycetes Americani Novi 


49 


Hab. ad cortices dejectos in silvis pr. Lyndonville, N. Y., 

I 9 ° 5 - 

A ceteris generis specieibus omnino diversa. 

6. Leptospora sparsa Sacc. et Fairm. sp. n. — Peritheciis 
superficialibus, sparsis, globulosis, carbonaceis, nigris, glabris, 
300-400 ix diam., breviter obtusule papillatis; ascis elongato-cylin- 
draceis basi sensim tenuato-substipitatis, 112-120x8-9 /x, octo¬ 
sporis, apice paullulum tenuatis, rotundatisque; sporidiis dis- 
tichis, cylindraceis sursum curvatis, 33 x 4 p, continuis, hyalinis, 
eguttulatis. 

Hab. ad ligna putrida in silvis pr. Lyndonville, N. Y., 1905. 

Peritheciis laxe sparsis, glabris, minoribus, non pachyderma- 
ticis, sporidiis non nucleatis, etc., a Lept. spermoide aliisque dis- 
tinguenda species. 

7. Leptosphaeria perplexa Sacc. et Fairm. sp. n. — 
Peritheciis gregariis, epidermide initio velatis, mox liberis, glo- 
bosis, basi applanatis, nigris, nitidulis, 250-300 /x diam., ostiolo 
conico-acuto, tertiam perithecii partem subaequante praeditis, 
vetustis submuticis; ascis cylindraceis, breve stipitatis, filiformi- 
paraphysatis, 85-90x10-11 /x, octosporis; sporidiis breve fuso- 
ideis, utrinque acutulis, curvulis, 3-septatis, non v. vix constrictis, 
22-25 x 5~6 /x flavido olivaceis. 

Hab. in caulibus emortuis Solidaginis sp., pr. Lyndonville, 

N. Y., Sept. 1905. 

Exemplaria in Boltonia forte eandem speciem sistunt, sed 
senescentia. A typica Lept. doliolo (in Angelica, etc.) differt 
peritheciis fere dimidio minoribus et ostiolis typice longioribus 
et acutioribus. Exemplaria in Dipsaco apud Rehm Ascom. n. 
194 potius hanc speciem quam Lept. doliolum spectant. 

8. Ceratostoma Fairmani Sacc. sp. n. — Peritheciis late 
et laxe gregariis, ligno putri molli fere totis immersis, globulosis, 

O. 4-0.5 mm. diam., nigris, glabris, rostellatis; rostello cylindraceo- 
acutiusculo, 500 x ioo/x, nitidulo, levissime longitrorsum sulcato; 
ascis fusoideo-clavatis, subsessilibus, deorsum sensim tenuatis 
obtusisque, apice quoque leviter tenuatis obtusisque, octosporis, 
19-22x8-8.5, aparaphysatis; sporidiis oblique monostichis v. 
subdistichis, ellipsoideis, 7 x 3-3.5 /x, e fronte rectis, e latere 
curvis, olivaceis, inaequaliter 1-3-guttulatis. 

Hab. in truncis putridis pr. Lyndonville, N. Y., Oct. 1905. 

Affine C. avocettae, a quo differt ascis subfusoideis, apara¬ 
physatis, sessilibus, sporidiis brevioribus, etc. 

B. Denteromycetae. 

9. Micropera ampelina Sacc. et Fairm. sp. n. — Pycnidiis 
sparsis v. seriatis, erumpenti-superficialibus inaequaliter glo- 
bosis, astomis, ceraceo-membranaceis, olivaceis, albo-furfura- 


50 


Journal of Mycology 


[Vol. 12 


ceis, 700 /x diam., basi stipitiformi crassa, 400 /x longa immersa 
praeditis, intus albidis farctis, excipulo minute celluloso, strato 
proligero crasso dilute olivaceo; sporulis tereti-fusoideis, curvis, 
utrinque obtusulis, 28-30 x 7.5-8 /x farctis, hyalinis; basidiis 
bacillaribus 15x2.5, hyalinis. 

Hab. in ramulis nondum emortuis Vitis viniferae, Ridgway, 
Orleans Co., N. Y., Aug. 1904. 

A ceteris generis speciebus probe distincta. Furfur a granu- 
lis crystallinis refrangentibus constat. Sporulae initio ellipsoideae 
rectiusculae, 10-11x4-5 /x. 

10. Verticillium discisedum Sacc. et Fairm. sp. n. — 
Minutissimum, confluendo effusum pruinam album maculi- 
formem in Lachneae disco fingens; hyphis sterilibus repentibus, 
parcis, fertilibus seu conidiophoris brevibus, 50-80 x 4 /x, ple- 
rumque cedo i-septatis, sursum trifidis, ramis tereti-fusoideis 
apice ramulos seu basidia verticillato terna v. quaterna cuspidata, 
raepe curvula, 15-20x3 /x, gerentibus; conidiis obovoideis, ma- 
jusculis, continuis, hyalinis, eguttatis, 8.5-9 x 5*5~6, in basidiorum 
apice solitariis. 

Hab. in disco Lachneae hemisphaericae, Lyndonville, N. Y., 
I 9 ° 5 - 

Affine Verticillia epimyceti sed colore albo, conidiis majori- 
bus differt. 

11. Helminthosporium orthospermum Sacc. et Fairm. 
sp. n. — Late effusum tenuiter, velutinum, opace nigrum; hyphis 
sterilibus repentibus parcis; fertilibus seu conidiophoris erectis, 
simplicibus, interdum fasciculatis, rectis, 3-4-septatis, non con- 
trictis, 50-60x5 /x, fuligineis; conidiis cylindraceis, apice rotun- 
datis, basi ima conico-truncatis, rectis, 60-80 x 10-12, rarius usque 
ad no /x longis, 12-14 septatis, non constrictis, septis binis sum- 
mis approximatis, fuligineis. 

Hab. in ligno putrescente (quercino?), Lyndonville, N. Y., 
Julio, 1905. 

Subaffine Helm, ifolliculato sed distinctissimum conidiophoris 
multo brevioribus et conidiis multo longioribus. 

II. 

Mycetes Mexicana a Doct. S. Bonansea lecti. 

A. Teleomycetae. 

Bonanseja Sacc. n. gen. (Etym. a cl. doct. Silvio Bonansea 
fungi detectore.)—Ascomata epidermide tecta dein erumpenti- 
subsuperficialia, disciformia, ceracea (brunnea), disco mox aper- 
to, applanato; excipulo brevissimo obsolete prosenchymatico. 
Asci cylindracei, paraphysati, octospori. Sporidia sphaeroidea 
hyalina, nucleata, dein brunnea. 


51 


March 1906 ] Micromycetes Americani Novi 

i . 

Gen. Stictophacidio Rehm affine sed praecipue sporidiis glo- 
bosis distinguendum. Est quasi Pseudo peziza Sphaero-phaeo- 
spora. 

12. Bonanseja Mexicana Sacc. sp. n. — Ascomatibus 
epiphyllis, secus nervos seriatis et interdum confluentibus, rimose 
erumpentibus et peidermide bullata exalbata tectis v. cinctis, 
disciformi-applanatis, 400-600 jx diam., tenuissime marginatis, 
ambitu circulari-angulosis, umbrinis, ceraceit; ascis cylindraceis 
rarius cylindrico-clavulatis, 100x8 v. 100 xn (si clavulatis 
deorsum sensim tenuatis, parte sporif. 50-60 [x longa, apice obtu- 
sis, octosporis, paraphysibus bacillaribus, hyalinis, 2-3 /x cr., con- 
tinuis, simplicibus; sporidiis typice monostichis, rarius sub- 
distichis, globosis, 7-8 fx diam, initio hyalinis, dein brunneis, 1- 
raro 2-nucleatis, levibus. 

Hab. in foliis languidis v. emortuis Anonae cherimoliae, 
Tenancingo, Mex., 1905. 

Excipulum tenuissimum rufo-melleum, granulis crystallinis 
copiosis asperulatum. 

B. Deuteromycetae. 

13. Phyllosticta consors Sacc. sp. n. — Pycnidiis hypo- 
phyllis, raro et epipylls, n maculis, Phleosporae Mori hinc inde 
dense aggregatis, globulosis, prominulis, 70-80 fx diam., ostiolo 
exiguo impresso; sporulis ellipsoideo-oblongis, saepe curvulis, 
4-4.5 x 2-2.1 fx, hyalinis, minutissime 2-guttulatis. 

Hab. in maculis ochraceo-brunneis Phleosporae Mori, ad 
folia Mori albae cultae, Tenancingo, Mex., No. 1905. 

14. Hendersonia Mexicana Sacc. sp. n. — Maculis minu- 
tis, epiphyllis, subinde paullulum elevatis, nigricantibus non v. vix 
discolori-marginatis, circ. 1 mm. diam.; pycnidiis subhemi- 
sphaericis, epidermide velatis sed prominulis, 140-160 fx diam., 
subastomis; contextu minute celluloso, fuligineo; sporulis tereti- 
oblongis utrinque obtuse rotundatis, 3-septatis, ad septa con- 
strictis, 12-14x5.5-7 fx, fuligineis; basidiis obsoletis. 

Hab. in foliis languidis Perseae gratissimae vulgo Aguacate, 
Tenancingo, Mex., Nov. 1905. 

Ad subgen. Phyllohendersoniam spectat. Septa manifestis- 
sima. 

15. Gloeosporium apiosporium Sacc. sp. n. — Maculis 
angulosis v. subcircularibus, amphigenis, brunneo-alutaceis, 6-8 
mm. diam., saepe confluentibus, nervis obscuratis limitatis; acer- 
vulis plerumque hypophyllis, innatis, creberrimis, punctiformibus, 
brunneis; conidiis obpiriformibus, apice rotundatis, 8 x 2.5 fx , 
crasse 1-2-guttatis, sessilibus, in cirros filiformes, tortuosos, copi- 
osissimos, alutaceos demum totas maculas obtegentes protrusis. 

Hab. in foliis languidis Arctostaphyli tomentosae vulgo Ma¬ 
drono de arbol, in territorio Mexici, Nov. 1905. 

Gl. alpino affine. Basidia nulla v. brevissima. 


52 


Journal of Mycology 


[Vol. 12- 


16. Cekcospora coleroides Sacc. sp. n. — Maculis amphi- 
genis, subcircularibus, 3-5 mm. diam., subgriseis linea atro- 
brunnea cinctis; interdum confluentibus; caespitulis amphigenis 
laxe gregariis punctiformibus, artis 200 \x diam., hvpostromate 
celluloso, pulvinato, fuligineo, erumpente; conidiophoris e super- 
ficie hypostromatis orientibus dense stipatis, paliformibus, sim- 
plicibus, continuis, olivaceis, 40-50x5.5-6, apice truncatulis; 
'conidiis in apice conidiophori solitariis, bacillaribus, rectis v. 
curvis, basi truncatis, olivaceis, brevioribus, 90-100 x 5-6 fx et 3-4- 
septatis, longioribus 140-150x5-6 jx et 10-12 septatis, non con- 
strictis, septis superioribus minus evidentibus, articulis plerumque 
utrincjue i-guttulatis. 

Hab. in foliis languidis Casimiroae edulis vulgo Zapote bian¬ 
co, Tenancingo, Mex., Nov. 1905. 

Ob caespitulos punctiformes conidiis radiantibus conspersos 
Coleroam in mentem revocat. Ob hypostrome conspicuum haec 
species et aliae consimiles ad Exosporium nutant. 

Patavii ex Institute botanico Universitatis. XXX Januarii 
MCMVI. 


EINIGE NEUE PILZE AUS NORD AMERICA. 

VON PROF. DR. FR. BUBAK, TABOR IN BOEHMEN. 

1. Puccinia Ptilosiae Bubak n. sp. — Teleutosporenlager 
rundlich oder elliptisch, auf beiden Blattseiten, hauptsachlich aber 
oberseits, anfangs bedeckt, spater ganz nackt, ^-1 mm. breit, rund- 
lich oder elliptisch, dunkel kastanienbraun, staubig. Teleuto- 
sporen einformig, ellipsoidisch, seltener langlich, 33-48/x lang, 
22-29/A breit (selten nur i8/a breit), an beiden Enden abge- 
rundet oder wenig verjiingt, in der Mitte schwach eingeschniirrt, 
mit brauner, 2.5^ dicker, deutlich warziger Membran. Warzen 
circa ljx dick, ihr Abstand i-2/a. Keimporus der oberen Zelle 
scheitelstandig oder um herabgeriickt, jener der Basalzelle in 
der unteren \ liegend. Stiel kurz, hyalin, briichig. 

Kalifornien: Amador County auf Blattern von Ptilosia lactu- 
cina, am 29, VII, 1896, leg. Hansen. 

Diese neu beschriebene Puccinia-Art, steht der Puccinia 
Picridis strigosae Sydow (Monographia Uredinearum I, p. 131) 
am nachsten ist von derselben aber durch viel schmalere Teleuto- 
sporen verschieden. Auch von Pace. Picridis Haszl. ist sie weit 
verschieden. 

Puccinia Ptilosiae Bubak ist wohl eine Brachypuccinia, wie 
Pucc. Picridis. Auf den mir vorliegenden Exsiccaten konnte 
ich aber keine Uredosporen auffinden. 

2. Phyllosticta convexula Bubak n. sp. — Flecken 
braunlich, unbestimmt oder fehlend; Fruchtgehause, unterseits, 
zwischen den dicht stehenden Perithecien von Sphaerella con- 




March 1906] Einige Neue Pilze Ans Nord America 


53 


vexula (Scliw.) Thum. zerstreut, anfangs subepidermal, spater 
mit kurz konischen Scheitel hervorbrechend, kuglig, vvenig ab- 
geflacht, endlich breit geoffnet, 60-100/4 breit, schwarz, von gelb- 
braunem, undeutlich zelligem, unten dunklerem Gewebe. 

Sporen bacillenartig, i. 5-2/4 lang, 1/4 dick, hyalin auf kurzen, 
stabchenformigen, hyalinen Sporentragern. 

Missouri: Emma, Salina Co. auf Blattern von Carya tomen- 
. tosa, leg. C. H. Demetrio, misit cl. Dr. O. Pazschke. 

Phyllosticta convexulla m. ist von alien Carya- uiid Jug- 
lans-Phyllosticten durch die winzigen Sporen verschieden. Sie 
kommt in Gesellschaft mit Sphaerella convexula (Schw.) 
Thumen, wesshalb sie auch “convexula” genannt wurde. 

3. Phoma Lophantpii Bubak. Septoria Lophanthi Ellis 
in schedis. Pykniden zerstreut, linsenformig zusammengedriickt, 
subepidermal, spater mit dem Scheitel hervorbrechend, 200-300/4 
breit, schwarz, mit 10-15/4 dicken Wanden, von parenchymati- 
schem, schwarzbraunem Gewebe. Sporen zylindrisch, 4.5-9 fx 
lang, 1.5-2/4 breit, gerade oder ofters gekriimmt, mit zwei polaren 
Oeltropfen, hyalin. Sporentrager papillenformig, hyalin. 

Ohio: Amanda, Fairfield, Co., auf toten Stengeln von Lo- 
phanthus nepetoides, leg. W. A. Kellerman, misit O. Pazschke. 

Der Pilz wurde mir von Pazschke unter dem Namen “Sep¬ 
toria Lophanthi Ellis spec, in schedis” geschickt. 

Die Sporen sind aber fur eine Septoria, rechte Rhabdospora 
zu kurz und da auch gerade Sporen zahlreich vorkommen, so 
halte ich den Pilz eher fur eine Phoma. Auch die zwei end- 
standigen Oeltropfen weisen auf die Gattung Phoma hin. 

Ich bemerke, dass ich nirgends in der Litteratur Septoria 
Lophanthi Ellis gefunden habe. Septoria Lophanthi Winter ist 
ganzlich verschieden. 

4. Phomopsis missouriensis Bubak n. sp. — Pykniden zer¬ 
streut, subepidermal, mit kurzem Schnabel hervorbrechend, sonst 
von der geschwarzten epidermis bedeckt, ani^ngs linsenformig, 
spater flach konisch, bis £ mm. breit, mit sehr dicken (bis 60/4) 
Wanden, innen von gelbbraunem, aussen dunkelbraunem, paren- 
chymatischem Gewebe. Sporen von zweierlei Art: 1) spindel- 
formig, 9-13/4 lang, 2.5-3. 5/4 dick, beiderseits spitzig, oft mit 
zweiteiligem (ohne Querwand! Inhalte; 2.) Stabchenformig, 
gerade oder gekriunmt, bis 20/4 lang, 1.5-2/4 dick, aber seltener als 
die ersteren entwickelt. Sporentrager fadenformig, bis 18/4 lang, 
1.5/4 dick, unten strauchartig verbunden, hyalin. 

Missouri: Emma, Salina Co., auf toten Stengeln von Ascle- 
pias verticillata, leg. C. H. Demetrio, misit O. Pazschke. 

Die vorliegende neue Art gehort, wie alle anderen Species 
dieser Gattung als konidienform zu irgend einer Diaporthe, viel- 
leicht zu Diaporthe Asclepiadis Ell. et. Ev. 

Was die Abtrennung dieser Gattung von Phoma betrifft, so 


54 Journal of Mycology [Vol. 12 - 

verweise ich auf meine Abhandlung in Oesterr. botan. Zeitschrift, 
1905, Nr. 2, p. 78. 

5. Haplosporella missouriensis Bubak n. sp. — Stromata 
iiber die Aeste in weitlaufigen Gruppen, anfangs subepidermal, 
spater hervorbrechend und nur an den Seiten bedeckt, flach pol- 
sterformig, J-f mm. breit, schwarz, mehr oder weniger glanzend, 
innen von hellgelblichem, aussen dunkelbraunem, parenchyma- 
tischem, ziemlich dickzelligem Gewebe. Kammern nicht zahl- 
reich, einreihig, vollkommen, manchmal auch unvollkommen, un- 
regelmassig. Sporen langlich oder zylindrisch, oft bohnenformig 
gebogen, oder in der Mitte biskuitartig zusammengezogen, 13-18/4 
lang, 4.5-7/1 breit, kastanienbraun, mit einem langlichen, in der 
Mitte der Spore liegenden Oeltropfel. Sporentrager faden- 
formig, hin und her gebogen, 76-80//, lang, 2/4 breit, am Scheitel 
gewohnlich erweitert, hyalin. 

Missouri: Emma, Salina Co., auf toten Aestchen von Persica 
vulgaris, leg C. H. Demetrio, misit O. Pazschke. 

Dieser neue Pilz kommt in Gesellschaft mit Sphaeropsis de- 
mersa (Bon.) Sacc. von welcher er aber total verschieden ist. 

6. Phleospora Hanseni Bubak n. sp. — Fruchtgehause 
oberseits, zerstreut, ohne Fleckenbildung, 150-220/4 breit, von 
der ziemlich stark gewolbten Epidermis bedeckt, durch dieselbe 
durchschimmernd, besonders im Umfange schwarz konturiert, an¬ 
fangs geschlossen spater gewohnlich deckelartig aufspringend und 
breit geoffnet, von hellen oder gelblichen, oben hellgelbbraunen, 
am Rande braunen, dickwandigen, lockeren Hyphen gebildet, 
welche oben keulenformig verdickt sind und am Rande der Oeff- 
nung paraphysenartige Gruppen bilden. Sporen stark sichelfor- 
mig bis halbkreisformig gebogen, seltener gerade, 20-35 fi lang, 
2.5-3^ breit, zu beiden Enden allmahlich verjiingt, einzellig oder 
mit einer deutlichen Querwand, hyalin auf papillenformigen, hya- 
linen Sporentragern. 

Californien: Pine Grove, Amador Co., auf lebenden Blattern 
von Quercus Morehus, am 19. XII, 1894, leg. Hansen. 

Ich stelle diesen interessanten Pilz in die Gattung Pleospora, 
da keine eigentliche Pyknide ausgebildet ist. Der basale Teil 
des Hymeniums ist oft cisternenartig vertieft, so dass zwei uber 
einander liegende und sporifizierende Raume gebildet werden. 

7. Rhabdospora Demetriana Bubak n. sp. — Pykniden 
auf silbergrauen, langlichen Flecken gruppiert oder ohne Flecken¬ 
bildung iiber die'^ Stengel und Aesten verteilt, subepidermal, kug- 
lig abgeflacht, 120-200/x breit, schwarz, mit breitem (oft bis 22 
papillenformigem Schnabel, mit circa 15/x dicken Wanden, von 
kastanienbraunem, parenchymatischem, am Schnabel fast schwar- 
zem Gewebe. Sporen nadelformig, 13-24/4 lang, 1.5-2/4 breit, ge¬ 
rade oder gebogen, gegen die Enden verjiingt, einzellig oder mit 


March 1906] Einige Neue Pilze Aus Nord America 


55 


einer wenig deutlichen Querwand, hyalin auf papillenformigen 
Sporentragern. 

Missouri: Emma, Salina Co., auf trockenen Stengeln und 
Aesten von Asclepias verticillata, leg. C. H. Demetrio, misit O. 
Pazschke. 

Diese neue Rhabdospora ist von Rhabdospora cynanchica 
S. B. R. durch grossere Pykniden, kiirzere und schmalere Koni- 
dien ganzlich verschieden. 

8. Leptothyrium californicum Bubak n. sp. — Flecken 
oberseits, rundlich, nicht scharf begrenzt, oft zusammen fliessend, 
braun, unterseits nicht sichtbar. Fruchtgehause oberseits, klein, 
auf den Flecken reichlich verteilt, circa 90/* breit, schildformig, 
convex, schwarz, glanzend, subepidermal, spater unregelmassig 
aufreissend, von ziemlich dickem, undeutlichem, schmutzig kas- 
tanienbraunem Gewebe. Sporen kurz ellipsoidisch, 4-6.5/* lang, 
2- 3/* breit, hyalin. Sporentrager kurz zylindrisch, circa 15/* lang, 
dichtstehend, hellolivenbraunlich. 

California: Pine Grove, Amador County, auf lebenden Blat- 
tern von Quercus Morehus am 19. XII, 1894,leg.Hansen. 

Diese neue Leptothyrium ist von alien verwandten Arten gut 
verschieden; es kommt in Gesellschaft mit Phleospora Hanseni 
m. auf denselben Blattern vor. 

9. Leptothyrium Pazschkeanum Bubak. n. sp. — Pyk¬ 
niden auf toten Stengeln und Aesten in weitlaufigen Gruppen, 
flach, schildformig, 50-120/* breit, braun, von hellgelbbraunem, 
parenchymatischem Gewebe, mit zentraler, dunklerer, unregel¬ 
massig rundlicher, nicht deutlich begrenzter Oeffnung. 

Sporen bacillenartig, 3-4.5/* lang, i/* dick, gerade oder 
schwach gebogen, hyalin, auf kurzen, undeutlichen Sporentragern. 

Missouri: Emma, Salina Co., auf toten Stengeln und Aesten 
von Asclepias verticillata, leg. C. H. Demetrio, misit O. Pazschke. 

Eine sehr schone Art, welche die toten Stengel und Aeste 
dicht mit braunen Pykniden bedeckt und braunlich verfarbt. 

10. Leptothyrium Kellermanni Bubak n. sp. — Pykni¬ 
den hauptsachlich unterseits, seltener und nur vereinzelt auch 
oberseits, manchmal auf bleichen Flecken, zerstreut, flach schild¬ 
formig, im Umrisse rundlich, 90-150/* breit, mattschwarz, von 
kleinzelligem, olivendunkelbraunem Gewebe. Sporen bakteri- 
enartig, 3-4.5/* lang, i/* dick, gerade, einzellig, auf schmal flaschen- 
formigen, 6-8/* langen, diinnen, unten biischelartig verbundenen, 
hyalinen Sporentragern. 

Ohio: Fairfield County, auf Blattern von Sassafras officina¬ 
lis , leg. W. A. Kellerman, misit O. Pazschke. 

Der neue Pilz kommt auf den Blattern in Gesellschaft mit 
Sphaerella Sassafras Ell. et Ev. vor. 


56 


Journal of Mycology 


[Vol. 12 


Pseudostegia Bubak n. g. Melanconiacearum. — Frucht- 
lager flach, rundlich im Umrisse, subepidermal, spater deckel- 
artig die Epidermis aufhebend, dann flach schiisselformig und 
am Rande mit Borsten besetzt. Sporen sichelformig, einzellig, 
hyalin. Sporentrager aus dem Inneren der obersten dekapitier- 
ten Zellen hervorbrechend, zylindrisch, hyalin oder schwach gelb- 
lich. 

ii. Pseudostegia nubilosa Bubak n. sp. — Fruchtlager 
auf toten Blattern auf beiden Blattseiten, reichlicher aber ober- 
seits, zerstreut oder gruppiert, manchmal zwischen den Nerven 
auch in kurzen Reihen stehend, flach, rundlich 120-160 /a breit, 
schwarz, matt, nabelartig vertieft, von der Epidermis bedeckt, 
spater dieselbe deckelartig auftreibend, dann nackt, schwach 
schiisselartig vertieft, mit weisslichgrauer Scheibe und ringsfor- 
miger, schwarzer Kontur am Rande, und daselbst borstig, mit 
grosszelligem diinnwandigem, dunkelbraunem, circa 55/A 
dickem Hypostroma. Borsten kastanienbraun, auf schon langer 
entblossten Lagern ziemlich zahlreich, bis 45 /a lang, circa 4 /a 
dick, allmahlich gegen den Scheitel verjiingt und unten oft zwie- 
belartig verdickt. Sporen schwach sichelformig gebogen, beider- 
seits verjiingt, manchmal auch zugespitzt, 18-24 /a lang, 2.5/A breit, 
einzellig, hyalin. Sporentrager als kurze, zylindrische Ausstul- 
pungen aus dem Inneren der obersten, dekapitierten Zellen des 
Fruchtlagers hervorbrechend, circa 8/a lang, hyalin oder schwach 
gelblich. 

Kentucky: Lexington auf toten Blattern von Carex sp., leg. 
W. A. Kellerman, misit O. Pazschke. 

Ein sehr interessanter Pilz, welcher mit meiner neuen Gat- 
tung Anaphysomene (Annales Mycologici 1906) verwandt ist. 

Das Mycel in Form von braunen, stellenweise dicken Hyphen 
dringt in dem toten Substrate bis in die Gefasse hinein. 

Es ist moglich, dass er als Konidienstadium zu Stegia Caricis 
Peck (welche aber mit Stegia subvelata Rehm identisch ist) ge- 
hort. 

Es scheint mir dann weiter, dass Cyptosporium nubilosum 
Ell. et Ev. mit meinem Pilze identisch ist, denn ich vermute, dass 
die Breite der Sporen nur durch einen Druckfehler statt 2.5/x- 
8.5 /a angegeben ist. Sollte meine Vermutung zutreffen, dann 
miisste der vorliegende Pilz Pseudostegia nubilosa (Ell. et Ev.) 
Bubak genannt werden. 

Bei Cryptosporium konnte er nicht verbleiben. 

Es scheint mir uberhaupt, dass unter dieser Firma, besonders 
unter den blatterbewohnenden Arten, viele genetisch verschiedene 
Pilze stecken. 

Tabor, Bohmen, am 25 Marz, 1906. 


March 1906] 


Dilophospora Alopecuri 


57 


DILOPHOSPORA ALOPECURI. 

ERNST A. BESSEY. 

Last November Dr. J. J. Davis of Racine, Wisconsin, sent 
to the writer some leaves of Calamagrostis canadensis collected 
in Kenosha County of that State. Among the galls caused by 
nematodes, for which reason they were sent, were found a few 
more obscure ones of different origin. At points the leaf was 
slightly swollen, the swellings taking in the space between two 
or three ribs and being 3 to 6 mm. long and 0.2 to 0.5 mm. in 
height. They contain pycnidia in one or two rows between each 
pair of ribs. They are immersed in the leaf tissue with the 
exception of a very small area around the ostiole which is with¬ 
out a beak. Usually they are at the upper, occasionally also at 
the lower surface of the leaf. The pycnidia are carbonaceous, 
spherical, 160 to 200 //, in diameter and entirely separate, with¬ 



out a stroma, or sometimes joined together by twos or threes. 
The spores are borne apparently singly on short sporophores, 
the long axis of the spore being continuous with that of the 
sporophore. When immature (but already free in the pycnidium) 
they are hyaline and one-celled. They soon however become 
segmented into four cells, the two middle cells becoming pale 
brown, the terminal cells and appendages remaining hyaline. 
(See fig. 1.) They are cylindrical or slightly fusiform, with 
rather truncate ends from which arise two to three usually once 
or twice forking appendages, tapering towards their ends. The 
spore may be slightly constricted at the septa. Rarely the spores 
are three-celled, either with the middle cell alone or the middle 
and one end cell colored. Exclusive of appendages the spores 
measure 15 to 20 by 2 to 2.3 averaging about 17 x 2.1 /*. The 











58 


Journal of Mycology 


[Vol. 12 


appendages are 5 to 7/x, rarely 10 /x long and about 0.5 /x in 
thickness at the base. In germinating the two middle cells 
become more turgid causing the spore to fall apart between 
them (Fig. 2). The germ tubes grow directly or obliquely 
from the middle septum. (Figs. 3 and 4.) The hyaline end 
cells do not germinate. 

In spite of the discrepancies between description and actual 
structure the fungus was recognized as a species of Dilophospora, 
and agrees in every regard, except a very slight difference in 
size of spores, with de Thumen, Mycotheca universalis No. 
456 D. graminis Desm. on Dactylis glomerata. It also agrees 
with Desmazieres’ figures. 1 ) Saccardo 2 ) gives the measurements 
as 10 x 1.7-2/x, but de Thumen’s specimens contain spores 11.6 
to 13.3 x 2-2.3 jul, while Desmazieres, who was the first to observe 
the spores, gives 12 to 13.3 as the length (1/50 mm. including 
appendages, these being £ to i the length of the spore body) 
and represents them in his illustration as 15 /x long. The differ¬ 
ences in size being so slight, it does not seem justifiable to 
consider the American form as distinct. 

This fungus was described in 1828 for the first time by 
Fries 3 ) as Sphaeria alopecuri and as such is described by Duby, 4 ) 
two years later. In 1840 Desmazieres, 1 ) to whom as well as 
to Fries and Duby the original collector had sent part of his 
material, established for the fungus a new genus Dilophospora 
and applied the specific name graminis citing Sphaeria alopecuri 
Fr. as a synonym. He described the spores as one-celled and 
hyaline in which he has been followed by Corda, 5 ) Bonorden, 6 ) 
Fuckel, 7 ) Allescher 8 ) and Saccardo. 2 ) Bonorden suggested that 
the spores were borne transversely, but this is false. 

Fries 9 ) in 1849 accepts Desmazieres’ generic name, but in¬ 
sists upon his own specific name, saying of Dilophospora : “Plures 
species in culmis graminum in terris calidioribus (Typus D. 
Alopecuri Fr. El. sub Sph.) The name should be accordingly 
Dilophospora alopecuri (Fr.) Fr. 

1 Ann. Sci. Nat. Bot. Ser. I. 14 : 5-7. pi. I. fig. 3 . 1840. 

2 Sylloge Fungorum. 3 :600. 1884. 

3 Elenchus Fungorum. 2: 91. 1828. 

4 Botanicon Gallicum. 2 :694. 1830. 

5 leones Fungorum. 5:30. 1842. 

0 Handbuch der Allgemeinen Mykologie. 227. 1851. 

7 Symbolae Mycologicae. 130. 1869. 

8 Rabenhorst, Kryptogamen-Flora Deutschland, &c. 2te Auflage, 
Bd. 1, Abth. 6. 947-948. 1901. 

9 Summa Veg. Scand. ^: 419. 1849. 







March 1906 ] Pleurotus Hollandianus Sp. Nov. 


59 


o 


PLEUROTUS HOLLANDIANUS SP. NOV. 


D. R. SUMSTINE. 


Horizontalis, imbricatus; pileo carnoso, tenui, sessili vel 
postice in stipitem brevem producto, semiorbiculari, ubique 
tomento denso tecto, albo vel luteo-albo, 1-3 cm. lat., 1-4 cm. long.; 
lamellis subdistantibus, simplicibus, inaequalibus, divergentibus, 
albidis, 1-3 mm. lat.; sporis subglobosis; cystidiis cylindraceo- 
fusoideis sursum acuminatis. P. petaloidei affinis sed forma, 
tomento pilei, latitudine lamellarum differt. Ad truncos putridos, 
Latrobe, Pennsylvania, 1903, 1904. 

The thick tomentum of the pileus readily distinguishes this 
species. The type specimens are in the Carnegie Museum, Pitts¬ 
burg, Pa. The name is given in honor of the director of the 
Carnegie Museum, Dr. W. J. Holland. 

Wilkinsburg, Pa., Feb. 12, 1906. 



NOTE ON WYNNEA AMERICANA. 


D. R. SUMSTINE. 


Mr. Jennings collected some plants at Ohio Pyle that agree 
fairly well with the description of Wynnea americana Thaxter 
(Bot. Gaz. 39:241. 1905.) There are some differences, how¬ 

ever, but not sufficient possibly to establish a new species. I 
append a description of the Ohio Pyle specimens. 

Apotheciis numerosis (3-11) in stipitem longum connatis, 
auritis, gelatino-carnosis, ad basim incisis, extus atrobrunneis, 
furfuraceo-tuberculatis, 2-8 cm. alt., 1-2 cm. lat.; stipite longo, 
solido, similiter, furfuraceo, coloratoque, radicato, supra valde 
incrassato, 3-6 cm. alt.; hymenio glabro, ochroleuco; ascis octo- 
sporis, cylindraceis longe stipitatis, iodo non tinctis; sporis 
monostichis, levibus, hyalinis, elliptico-fusiformibus, plerumque 
guttulatis; paraphysibus linearibus, vix apice incrassatis, septatis; 
ramosis. 

Hab. in terra arenosa, Ohio Pyle, Pennsylvania, Septembri, 


1905. 


Wilkinsburg, Pa. 






60 


Journal of Mycology 


[Vol. 12 


SECOND SUPPLEMENT TO NEW GENERA OF FUNGI 
PUBLISHED SINCE THE YEAR 1900, WITH CITA¬ 
TION AND ORIGINAL DESCRIPTIONS. 

COMPILED BY P. L. RICKER. 

II. SCHIZOMYCETAE. 

[ Schizomycetae. ] 

Aplanobacter E. F. Smith n. g. Bacteriaceae. Bacteria in 
Relation to Plant Diseases, 1:171. 1905. 

“An unattached, non-motile, rod-shaped organism, destitute 
of chlorophyll and multiplying by fission, sometimes forming 
threads of considerable length. The type of the genus, in the 
family Bacteriaceae, is that organism causing anthrax and most 
commonly known in literature as Baccillus anthracis Cohn.” 

III. Phycomycetae. 

[Phycomycetae.] 

Actinocephalum Saito n. g. Mucoraceae. The Botanical 
Magazine, Tokyo, 19:36, pi. 3T. 1-12. 1905. Not Actinocephalus 
Kiitz. Phyc. Gen. 190. 1843. 

“Caespitulo griseo, mycelio inaequali, ramoso, citra substra¬ 
tum expanso; hyphis sporangiferis erectis, basi rhizoidibus des* 
titutis, generaliter verticillatis ramosis, ramis capitulato-inflatis, 
diametro vesiculis 25-55//,; condiis globosis vel ovalibus, 20//, vel 
18x21//,, monospermis in processibus insertis, hyalinis, echinu- 
latis, zygosporis et chlamydo-sporis ignotis.” 

[See Saitomyces Ricker .] 

[Phycomycetae.] 

Actinomucor Schostakowitsch n. g. Mucoraceae. Zeitschrift 
fur Angewandte Mikroskopie 8:35. 1903. 

“Alle Eigenschaften dieses Pilzes treten besonders deutlich 
hervor, wenn er auf irgend welchem auf Wasser frei schwimmen- 
den substrate wachst. * * * Bald nach der Sporenaussaat be- 
deckt sich die Fliege mit einem Mycel, welches in das Innere des 
, Insektenkorpers eindringt, sich auch teilweise im Wasser ver- 
breitet und dieselben Eigenschaften aufweist, die dem Muco- 
raceenmycel uberhaupt eigentiimlich sind.” 

“Nach drei bis vier Tagen bilden sich vom Mycel zahlreiche 
Auslaufer; sie kriimmen sich schwach bogenformig und ver- 
breiten sich nach alien Richtungen auf der Wasseroberflache. Sie 
sind 10-15//. dick, unseptiert und zerzweigt.” 

“Die Sporagien, welche die Hauptzweige abschliessen, sind 
grosser als diejenigen, welche auf kurzen querliegenden Aesten 
sitzen und das Hauptsporangium wie mit einem kranz umgeben. 
Die Hauptsporangien sind kugelig, durchschnittlich 120//, im 
Durchmesser, mit zerbrechlicher, stark inkrustierter Membran 
versehen. Die Nebensporangien erreichen eine Grosse von nicht 


March 1906] Second Supplemerit to New Genera 


61 


fiber 40/x im Durchmesser; ihr Membran ist fester als bei den 
Hauptsporangien. Die Columella der Hauptsporangien ist kegel- 
formig 90-100/x hoch, 60-80^ breit, mit glatter Membran und far- 
blosem Inhalte; die Columella der Nebensporangien ist viel 
kleiner, knopfformig, 40/x hoch und 30/x breit. Die Sporen sind 
kugelig gleichartig, durchschnittlich 7/x in Durchmesser, einseln 
farblos, behauft schwarzlich.” 

[ Phycomycetae. ] 

Peronoplasmopara Berk n. g. Peronosporaceae. Report of 
the Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station, 1904. 4:334. 
pi. 29-31. 1905. 

“Conidiophores of the dichotomous or modified dichotomous 
type of branching; with branches spreading mainly at acute 
angles, the ultimate spore-bearing tips being separate and sub- 
obtuse. Conidia chiefly large, tinted (violet chiefly), with a 
conspicuous papilla of dehiscence and germination typically by 
zoospores. Haustoria small and usually simple.” 

[Phycomycetae.] 

P iiloeophthora Klebahn n. g. Peronosporaceae. Central- 
blatt fur Bakteriologie, und Parasitenkunde, Abt. 11. 15:336. 

I 9 ° 5 - 

“In den Intercellularraumen der kranken Rinde findet sich 
ein Pilz, dessen dicke, plasmareiche, mit sparlichen aber charak- 
teristischen Querwanden versehene Hyphen bis an die Grenzen 
der Braunfarbung vordringen. Der Pilz bildet Dauersporen, im 
Gewebe der Rinde in den Intercellularen, in den Knospen auch 
zwischen den Blatt- und Blfitenanlagen. Die Sporen sind rund 
oder oval, 18-28 /x dick und haben eine dicke, glatte, farblose 
oder schwach gelbliche Membran. Sie liegen innerhalb eines 
zweiten, zarten, meist etwas abstehenden Membran, welcher 
aussen eine kleinere, leere Zelle flach ansitzt, mitunter hat die 
Sporenmembran eine rohrenformige Einstiilpung nach innen, die, 
wenn sie vorhanden ist, stets da liegt, wo die kleinere Zelle aussen 
ansitzt. Diese Strukturen erinnern an die Oosporen, Oogonien 
und Antheridien der Peronosporaceen.” 

[Phycomycetae.] 

Pythites Pampaloni n. g. Saprolegnaceae. Atti della Reale 
Accademie dei Linceie V. 111250. 1902. Fossil. 

“Mycelium filamentosum tunc parce tunc crebre ramosum; 
hyphae incolores tunc uniformi crassitudine, tunc irregulariter 
varicosae; oogonia monospora, sphaeroidea, laevia, terminalia 
70-100^.” 

[ Phycomycetae. ] 

Saitomyces Ricker n. n. Mucoraceae. Actinocephalum Saito 
1905, not Actinocephalus Kutz. 1843. 

Tpye Saitomyces japonicus (Saito) Ricker n. comb. 

A. japonicus Saito, Tokyo Bot. Mag. 19:36. 1905. 




62 


Journal of Mycology 


[Vol. 12 


[Phycomycetae.] 

Thamnocephalis Blakeslee n. g. Mucoraceae. Botanical 
Gazette, 40:165. 1905. 

“Vegetative hyphae fine, continuous, anastomosing. Fruc¬ 
tification erect, consisting of a main stalk supported above the 
substratum by stout rhizoidal props and bearing a bushy crown 
of subdichotomously-branched fertile hyphae, terminated by sterile 
branches. Spores solitary, borne on the surface of spherical 
heads. Heads borne at the apex of short lateral stalks which 
arise at nodes from opposite sides of the fertile hyphae at right 
angles to their planes of branching.” 

[Phycomycetae.] 

Zygorhizidium Loewenthal n. g. Chytndiaceen. Archiv. 
fur Protistenkunde, 5 2 1228. pi. 7-8. 1905. 

“Der gefundene Parasit wiirde in die Gattung Rhizidium in 
Umgrenzung von Fischer wohl hineinpassen, unterscheidet sich 
aber von ihr durch das Vorhandensein einer heterogamen Copu¬ 
lation, ein so wichtiger Unterschied, das trotz aller Scheu vor 
neuen Gattungen die Aufstellung einer neuen Gattung Zygorhi¬ 
zidium gerechtfertigt erscheinen diirfte. 

Ebenso wie bei Rhizidium bildet sich der Korper aus der 
erstarkten Schwamspore; er bleibt ausserhalb der Wirtzelle, in 
welche nur eine Blase und davon ausgehende iiberaus feine, 
kurze Hyphen hineinwagen. Der ausserhalb liegende Teil ist 
mehr oder weniger genau kugelig, seine Grosse schwankt zwi- 
schen 4-15 \x. Nur die kleinsten Exemplare weichen erheblicher 
von der Kugelgestalt ab und sind langlich birnformig, mit der 
Langsachse annahernd senkrecht zur Membran der Cylindro- 
cystis-Zelle gestellt.” 


IV. Ascomycetae. 

[Ascomycetae.] 

Acanthostigmella von Hohnel n. g. Sphaeriales. Annales 
Mycologici, 3 : 327. 1905. 

“Perithecien klein, hautig, oberflachlich, mit kurzzylindri- 
scher Miindungspapille, die von derben Borsten umgeben ist, 
sonst fast kahl. Asci keulig, achtsporig, ohne Paraphysen. 
Sporen langlich, subhyaline, mit 2 bis mehreren Querwanden.” 

[Ascomycetae.] 

Anixiella von Hohnel n. subg. of Anixia. Sitzungsberichte 
der Kaiserl. Akademie der Wissenschaften, mathematisch-natur- 
wissenschaftlichen Classe, 111:991. 1902. 

“Asci aparaphysati.” 

[Ascomycetae.] 

Chaetomites Pampaloni n. g. Sphaeriaceae. Atti della Reale 
Accademie dei Lincei V. 11:25o. 1902. Fossil. 

“Perithecia superficialia, 1 mm. lata, gregaria carbonaceo- 


March 1996 ] Second Supplement to New Genera 


63 


membranacea, aterrima, superne glabrata, inferne pilis densis, 
longissimis, tortuosis, simplicibus, fusci, vestita.” 

[Ascomycetae.] 

Cryptosporina von Hohnel n. g. Hypocreaceae. (Crypto- 
sporella aurea Fckl. and C. hypodermia (Fr.) ). Oesterreichische 
Botanische Zeitschrift, 55 : 54. 1905. 

[Ascomycetae.] 

Dendrostilbella von Plohnel n. g. Pezizaceae. Oesterreich¬ 
ische Botanische Zeitschrift, 55 : 22. 1905. 

“ 1 st Stilbella mit buschelig und wirtelig verzweigten Spo- 
rentragern. Sporen sehr klein. Gehort als Nebenfruchtform zu 
Coryne-Arten.” 

[Ascomycetae.] 

Dictyonia Syd. n. n. Rhemiomyces P. Henn. 1904. Not 
Sacc. & Syd. 1902. Bulgariaceae. Annales Mycologici 2:549. 
1904. 

[Ascomycetae.] 

Didymascina von Hohnel n. g. Sphaeriales. Annales My¬ 
cologici, 3:331. 1905. 

“Ascomata eingesenkt, erst kugelig und geschlossen, dann 
sich mit rundlichem Porus offnend, ohne deutliches oder mit 
im ausseren Teile gut entwickeltem Excipulum Schlauchboden 
flach, ohne eigene Wandung. Asci zylindrisch, 8-sporig; Sporen 
braun, zweizellig. Paraphysen zahlreich, fadig, verzweigt und 
oben netzig verbunden, ein Epithecium bildend. Holz und Rin- 
den bewohnend.” 

[Ascomycetae.] 

Englerula P. Hennings n. g. Hypocreaceae. Botanische 
Jahrbiicher fur Systematik, Pflanzengeschichte und Pflanzengeog- 
raphie, 34 49. 1904. 

“Perithecia hyphicola superficialia, sicco subcornea, mellea, 
humido subgelatinosa, tenui-membranacea, sine structura cellu¬ 
lose, vix ostiolata. Asci ovoidei, 8-spori, aparaphysati. Sporae 
atrofuscae, i-septatae. Spegazzimulae, Passerinulae an affinis?” 

[Ascomycetae.] 

Euanixia von Hohnel n. subg. of Anixia. Sitzungsberichte 
der Kaiserl. Akademie der Wissenschaften, mathematisch-natur- 
wissenschaftlichen Classe 111:991. 1902. 

“Asci paraphysati.” 

[Ascomycetae.] 

Feracia Rolland n. g. Spahaeriales. Bulletin Trimestriel de 
la Societe Mycologique de France, 21:28. 1905. 

“Novum genus, de ferax, productif, fructueux; allusion a 
une plus grand quantite de spores dans la theque. 

Perithecia glabra, sparsa vel gregaria, erumpentia, mem¬ 
branacea, ostiolata. 



64 Journal of Mycology [Vol. 12 

Asci clavati, paraphysati, vigenti-quatuor aut ultra sporidia 
phoeodictia gignentes.” 

[Ascomycetae.] 

Geasterina Sacc, n. subg. of Pyrenopeziza. Annales Mycol- 
ogici2:i6. 1904. 

[Ascomycetae.] 

HenningsO'Myces Saccardo n. g. Sphaeriaceae. Sylloge 
Fungorum 17 : 689. 1905. 

“Perithecia superficialibus, atris, globosa-piriformibus, rostro 
leniter curvulo, noduloso instructis, basi circa 1 mm. latis, fere 
2 mm. longis; ascis cylindraceis, breviter stipitatis, 85 fi long; 
sporidiis oblique et irregulariter monostichis, oblongo-ovatis, 10 
septatis, brunneis 10 x 4.” 

[Ascomycetae.] 

Hypostomacees Vuillemin n. fam. Annales Mycologici, 
3: 342. 1905. 

[Ascomycetae.] 

Hypoxylina Starback n. g. Xylariaceae. Arkiv for Botanik 
5 7 =29. 1905. 

“Stroma pulvinatum vel pulvinato-effusum, tenue; perithecia 
acervulatim conjuncta, textura carnosa, densissime prismatica, 
nectriodea; sporidia continua ellipsoidea, fusca. Hypoxylon 
primo obtuitu in memoriam revocans textura molissima, sub lente 
si tenuissime praeparata, lilacino-vinosa genus facile Hypocrea- 
ceis adscribendum; a Penzigia peritheciis semiliberis vel basi 
tantum conjunctis nec non textura plane differt.” 

[Ascomycetae.] 

Lentomitella von Hohnel n. g. Ceratostomeae, Annales 
Mycologici 3 :552. 1905. 

“Wie Lentomita, aber die Sporen mit aussen aufgesetzten 
feinen Langsstreifen versehen, daher am optischen Querschnitte 
ringsum mit kleinen Warzchen besetzt.” 

[Ascomycetae.] 

Melanosporites Pampaloni n. g. Hypocreaceae. Atti della 
Accademie dei Lincei V, 11:251. 1902. 

“Perithecia superficialia, simplicia, mollia, membranacea, 
sphaeroidea, flavescentia, villo fusco, stipato tecta, 6 sporis nigris, 
sphaeroides-ellipsoideis 60-80/A.” 

[Ascomycetae.] 

Microthyrites Pampaloni n. g. Microthyriaceae. Atti della 
Reale Accademie dei Lincei, V, 11:25o. 1902. Fossil. 

“Perithecia superficialia, sparsa, simplicia, membranacea di- 
midiata, sentiformia, cellulis exiguis, poligonalibus, concentricis, 
15-20 jjl latis, fuscis, margine crenulatis.” 

[Ascomycetae.] 

Mitruliopsis Peck n. g. Helvellaceae. Bulletin of the 
Torrey Botanical Club, 30:100. 1903. 


March 1906 ] Second Supplement to New Genera 


65 


“Ascomata fleshy, obovate or spathulate, stipitate; asci 8- 
spored, aparaphysate; spores filiform. 

A genus related to Mitrula andSpathularia, but with fiiliform 
spores.” 

[Ascomycetae.] 

Nematospora Peglion n. g. Saccharomycetaceae. Central- 
blatt fur Bakterologie Parasitenkunde und Infektions-Kranheiten 
Abteilung II, 7 754. pi. 1-11. 1904. 

“Wie ich in der angefiihrten Arbeit sagte, sind die Sporen 
der Nem. Coryli fadenformig oder besser ein wenig spindel- 
formig, die eine der Spitzen ist abgerundet, die andere lauft in 
ein langes Flagellum oder eine Geissel aus, die in jedem Zustande 
des Substrates, auf dem sich die Spore befindet, unbeweglich ist. 
Ihre Lange schwankt zwischen 38 und 40/x, ohne die Geissel, die 
35-40 fx misst. Die Dicke der Spore betragt 2-3 /x.” 

[Ascomycetae.] 

Nigrosphaeria Gardner n. g. Hypocreales. University of 
California Publications. Botany, 2:179. 1905. 

“Parasitic mycelium consisting of scanty white filaments 
penetrating the subhymenial tissue of the host. Perithecia aris¬ 
ing from single erect filaments, sphaerical, without an ostiolum. 
Asci broadly clavate. Peridium white, smooth. Ascospores 
single-celled, brownish or black. Paraphyses none.” 

[Ascomycetae.] 

Paranectriella P. Henn. n. subg. Paranectria. Hypocrea- 
ceae Sacc. Syll. Fung. 17:812. 1905. 

[Ascomycetae.] 

Perisporites Pampaloni n. g. Perisporiaceae. Atti della 
Reale Accademie dei Lincei V, 11:251. 1902. 

P. hirsutus. “Perithecia reniformia, simplicia, libera, virido 
carbonacea, cellulis fere 8 /x latis contexta, astoma, fere ad tertium 
sulco circulari praedita, 25-26 setulis atris, rigidis, perithecium 
fere aequantibus.” 

P. setosus. “Perithecia rotunda simplicia, libera, virido- 
carbonacea, cellulis minutis fere 4 /x latis contexta, globosa, as¬ 
toma, 18 setulis artis, rigidis, perithecium fere aequantibus.” 

[Ascomycetae.] 

Phaeosaccardinula P. Henn. n. g. Microthyriaceae. Hed- 
wigia, 44: 67, f. a-c. 1905. 

“Perithecia superficialia (phyllogena) scutellato-dimidiata, 
contextu subradiato-celluloso, fusco. Asci subovoidei, 8-spori, 
paraphysati: Sporae oblonge cylindraceae, pluriseptatae, muraliae, 
fuscae. Saccardinula Speg. ascis paraphysatis, sporis fuscis etc. 
diversa.” 

[Ascomycetae.] 

Phragmographum P. Henn. n. g. Hysteriaceae. Hedwigia, 
44:68. f. a-d. 1905. 


66 


/ournal of Mycology 


|Vol. 12 


“Perithecia superficialia, sublinearia, simplicia vel ramulosa, 
rima longitudinali dehiscentia, submembranacea, atra. Asci 
subovoidei, clavati, 8-spori, paraphysati. Sporae longefusoideae, 
pluriseptatae, basi subrostratae, hyalinae. Aulographo affin. sed 
sporae pluriseptatae.” 

[Ascomycetae.] 

Pteromyces Bomm. Rouss. & Sacc. n. g. Pezizales. Annales 
Mycologici 3 1507. 1905. 

“Ascomata perexigua, depresse globulosa, tenuissime carno- 
sula, pallide colorata, supra circulariter dehiscentia et discum 
(nucleum?) pallidiorem ostendentia; excipulf contextu tenuissime 
pseudoparenchymatico, margine subintegro non flexuo nec vere 
distincto. Asci e basi fasciculati, clavulati, subsessiles, octospori, 
paraphysibus bacillaribus cincti. Sporidia ovoidea, continua, 
hyalina, minuta.” 

[Ascomycetae.] 

Robertomyces Starback n. g. Pezizaceae. Arkiv for Botanik 
5 7: 5 - pb i.f. 4 - I 905 - 

“Apothecia erumpentia, patellariaceae, textura fuligineo-a- 
trata, coriaceo-carbonacea, globulosa, in juvenibus stratu super- 
ficiale textura erecta prismatico gignuntur; inter ascos evolutos 
restant reliquiae contextus prismatici in epithecium globulosum, 
fuligineo-nigrum transeuntes. Sporidia hyalina, continua. Para- 
physes nullae. Mirabile hoc genus Med. D: ri Robert Fries, per- 
itissimo mycologo, fratisque ejus filio Phil. D: ri Robert E. Fries, 
diligentissimo botanico, ut amicitiae pignus dedicatum volui.” 

[Ascomycetae.] 

Rollandia Patouillard n. g. Gymnoascaceae. Bulletin Tri- 
mestriel de la Societe Mycologique de France, 21 :83. 1905. 

“Receptaculum determinatum, ex hyphis septatis, ramosis, 
pannoso-contextis formatum. Asci suboctospori, ovoideo-globosi^ 
minuti, hyalini, dense glomerati; glomeruli numerosi, sparsi, 
noduliformes, trama undique obvoluti. Sporae hyalinae.” 

[Ascomycetae.] 

Seuratiaceae Vuillemin n. fam. Perisporiales. Bulletin 
Trimestriel de la Societe Mycologique de France, 21: 79. 1905. 

[Ascomycetae.] 

Uncinulites Pampaloni n. g. Perisporiaceae. Atti della 
Reale Accademia dei Lincei V, 11:250. 1902. Fossil. 

“Perithecia subglobosa, tenui membranacea, nigra, astoma, 
30-35 ix, appendicibus simplicibus, 18-25 cm. longis, apice uncina- 
tis, perithecium fere aequantibus, indivisis, ad apecem fuscis ad 
basim atris.” 

[Ascomycetae.] 

Unguicularia von Hohnel n. g. Pezizaceae. Annales Myco¬ 
logici, 3:404. 1905- 



March 1906 ] Index to North American Mycology 


67 


“Ascomata klein, Pezizella-artig, oberflachlich aufsitzend, 
nach unten verschmalert. Gewebe sehr kleinzellig bis faserig. 
Asci keulig, 8-sporig, sporen 2-3 reihig, einzellig, langlich, Para- 
physen sehr diinn; Ascomata aussen mit sehr dickwandigen, 
spitzen Haaren bedeckt.” 

(To be concluded.) 


INDEX TO NORTH AMERICAN MYCOLOGY. 

Alphabetical List o\f Articles, Authors, Subjects, New Species 
and Hosts, New Names and Synonyms. 

W. A. KELLERMAN. 

(Continued from page 231, Vol. II.) 

Acer rubrum, host to Valsaria acericola Ellis & Fairman n. sp. 
Proc. Rochester Acad. Sci. 4:189. 2 Sept. 1905. 

Acer, wood, host to Chaetosphaera ludens Morgan n. sp. Jour. 
My col. 11:105. May 1905. 

Adolphia infesta, host to Phyllachora adeolphiae Ellis & Keller- 
man n. sp. Jour. Mycol. 10:232. Sept. 1904. 

Aecidium argithamniae Arthur n. sp., on Argithamnia schiediana 
Mull. Arg. (?) [Mexico.] Bull. Torr. Bot. Club, 33:33. Jan. 
1906. 

Aecidium batesianum Barth n. sp., on leaves and petioles of 
Delphinium albescens Rydb. Fungi Columbiani No. 1901. 

Aecidium cardui Arthur 11. sp., on Carduus hookerianus (Nutt.) 
Heller (Cirsium hookerianum Nutt.) Bull. Torr. Bot. Club, 
33 : 33 - J an - 1906- 

Aecidium falcatae Arthur n. sp., on Falcata comosa (L.) Kunze 
(Amphicarpaea monoica Ell.), and Apios apios (L.) MacM. 
(A. tuberosa Moench.) Bull. Torr. Bot. Club, 33:32. Jan. 
1906. 

Aecidium punctatum Pers. (Ae. quadrifidum DC.) [Cultures 
on Prunus serotina Arthur.] Jour. Mycol. 12:19. Jan. 1906. 

Aecidium triostei Arthur n. sp., on Triosteum angustifolium L. 
Bull. Torr. Bot. Club, 33 :32. Jan. 1906. 

Aeschynomene americana L., host to Uredo aeschynomenis Ar¬ 
thur n. sp. Bot. Gaz., 39:392. June 1905. 

Agaricaceae, snynopsis of, with white context. [Murrill] Bull. 
Torr. Bot. Club, 32:491. Sept. 1905. 

Agaricus, see Polyporaceae of North America X ... . 

Agaricus (Dill.) L. [Striglia Adams., Daedalea Pers., Daeda- 
leopsis Schroet.] [Murrill.] Bull. Torr. Bot. Club, 32:83. 
Feb. 1905. 



68 


Journal of Mycology 


[Vol. 12 


Agaricus aesculi (Schw.) Murrill n. n. [Boletus aesculus flavae 
Schw., Polyporus aesculi Fr., Trametes incana Berk., Daeda- 
lea ambigua Berk., Trametes ambigua Fr., T. lactea Fr., 
Lenzites glaberrima B. & C., Daedalea glaberrima B. & C., 
Trametes berkeleyi Cooke.] Bull. Torr. Bot. Club, 32:89. 
Feb. 1905. 

Agaric, Another Fly. [Amanita olitoria Bull.] D. R. Sum- 
stine. Jour. Mycol. 11:267. Nov. 1905. 

Agaricus confragosus (Bolt.) Murrill n. n. [Boletus confrago- 
sus Bolt., Daedalea confragosa Pers., D. rubescens A. & S., 
D. albida Schw., D. zonata Schw., D. discolor Fr., D. dis¬ 
color, Kl., D. corrugata Kl., Trametes rubescens Fr., Lenzites 
klotzschii Berk., L. crataegi Berk., L. unguliformis B. & C., 
L. bicolor Fr., L. Cookeii Berk., L. proxima Berk.] Bull. 
Torr. Bot. Club, 32 :86. Feb. 1905. 

Agaricus cothurnatus Peck, n. sp., rich soil along roadsides and 
paths. Bull Torr. Bot. Club, 31 :i8i. Apr. 1904. 

Agaricus deplanatus (Fr.) Murrill n. n. [Daedalea elegans 
Spreng., D. deplanata Fr., Lenzites deplanata Fr., Trametes 
elegans Fr., T. centralis Fr.] Bull. Torr. Bot. Club, 32:91. 
Feb. 1905. 

Agaricus labyrinthiformis Bull., syn of Agaricus quercinus q. v. 

Agaricus juniperus Murrill n. sp., on a red cedar' stump. Bull. 
Torr. Bot. Club, 32 :85. Feb. 1905. 

Agaricus quercinus L. [A. labyrinthiformis Bull., Daedalea 
quercina Pers., Polyporus latissimus Fr., Daedalea quercina 
var. nigricans Fr.] [Murrill.] Bull. Torr. Bot. Club, 32:85. 
Feb. 1905. 

Agaricus rhodoxanthus Schw., syn. of Boletinus rhodoxanthus 
q. v. 

Agaricus rutilescens Peck n. sp., manured ground in pastures. 
Bull. Torr. Bot. Club, 31:180, Apr. 1904. 

Agaricus solidipes Peck n. sp., prairie pastures. Bull. Torr. Bot. 
Club, 31 :i8o. Apr. 1904. 

Agaricus sphaerosporus Peck, n. sp., rich soil. Bull. Torr. Bot. 
Club, 31 :i8i. Apr. 1904. 

Agropyron spicatum (Ph.) Rydb., host to Puccinia pattersoniana 
Arthur n. sp. Bull. Torr. Bot. Club, 33^29. Jan. 1906. 

Aguacate, see Dolichos reticulata . 

Amelanchier, dead twigs, host to Botryodiplodia amelanchieris 
Ellis & Fairm. Jour. Mycol. 10:229. Sept. 1904. 

Amphipterygium amphifolium Hemsl. & Rose, host to Phyl- 
losticta amphipterygii Ricker n. sp. Jour. Mycol. 11:111. 
May 1905. 


March 1906 ] Index to North America?i Mycology 


69 


Amphicarpaea monoica Ell., host to Aecidium falcatae Arthur n. 

sp. Bull. Torr. Bot. Club, 33 132. Jan. 1906. 

Amphispores [of Puccinia caricis (Schum.) Reb. Arthur.] 
Jour. Mycol. 12:15. Jan. 1906. 

Amanitas of Sweden [nine species compared with the American 
representatives]. H. C. Beardslee. Jour. Mycol. 11:212-6. 
Sept. 1905. 

Andira excelsa, host to Polystigma pusillum Syd. n. sp. [Guate¬ 
mala.] Ann. Mycolog. 2:167. Mar. 1904. 

Andropogon hirtiflorus Kth., host to Uromyces clingyi Pat. & 
Har. Jour. Mycol. 11:115. May 1905. 

Andropogon liebmannii Hack., host to Uromyces clingyi Pat. & 
Har. Jour. Mycol. 11:115. May 1905. 

Andropogon schottii Rupr., host to Uromyces clingyi Pat. & 
Har. Jour. Mycol. 11:115. May 1905. 

Andropogon sp., host to Balansia discoidea P. Hennings. [Atkin¬ 
son.] Jour. Mycol. 11:255. Nov. 1905. 

A New American species of Wynnea. Roland Thaxter. Bot. Gaz. 
39:241-7. PI. IV-V. April 1905. 

Another Fly Agaric [Amanita olitoria Bull.] R. S. Sumstine. 
Jour. Mycol. 11:267. Nov. 1905. 

Anthostoma acerinum Ellis & Fairman n. sp., on bark of maple. 
Proc. Rochester Acad. Sci. 4:189. 2 Sept. 1905. 

Apios apios (L.) MacM., host to Aecidium falcatae Arthur n. 
sp. Bull. Torr. Bot. Club, 33 :32. Jan. 1906. 

Apios tuberosa Moench., host to Aecidium falcatae Arthur n. sp. 
Bull. Torr. Bot. Club, 33 :32. Jan. 1906. 

Aplanobacter Erwin F. Smith nov. gen. nom. The type of the 
genus, in the family Bacteriaceae, is that organism' causing 
anthrax and most commonly known in literature as Bacillus 
anthracis Cohn. Bact. Rel Plant Dis. 1:171. Sept. 1905. 
Argithamnia schiediana Miill. Arg. ( ?), host to Aecidium argi- 
thamniae Arthur n. sp. Bull. Torr. Bot. Club, 33:33. Jan. 
1906. 

Aristida dichotoma, host to Dothichloe aristidae Atkinson. Jour. 
Mycol. 11 :26i. Nov. 1905. 

Aristida purpurascens, host to Dothichloe aristidae Atkinson. 
Jour. Mycol. 11:261. Nov. 1905. 

Artheropogon curtipendulus, see Bouteloua curtipendula . . . 

Arthur, J. C. Baeodromus Holwayi Arth., a New Uredineous 
Fungus from Mexico. Ann. Mycolog. 3:18-20. Feb. 1905. 

Arthur, J. C. Cultures of Uredineae in 1905. Jour. Mycol. 
12:11-27. Jan. 1906. 


Journal of Mycology 


70 


[Vol. 12 


Arthur, J. C. Leguminous Rusts from Mexico. Bot. Gaz. 39: 

385-39 6 - J un e 1905- 

Arthur, Joseph Charles. New Species of Uredineae. IV. Bull. 
Torr. Bot. Club, 33 :27~34. Jan. 1906. 

Arthur, J. C. Terminology of the spore-structures in the Ure- 
dinales. Bot. Gaz. 39:219-222. March 1905. 

Arundinaria macrosperma, host to Dothidella minima Sacc. et 
Syd. n. sp. Ann Mycolog. 2:164. Mar. 1904. 

Asclepias sp. ?, host to Lophiostoma imperfecta Ellis & Fairman 
n. sp. Proc. Rochester Acad. Sci. 4:187. 2 Sept. 1905. 

Ascochyta lycopersici Brun., A New Egg Plant Fungus. Clay¬ 
ton O. Smith. Jour. Mycol. 10:98-9. May 1904. 

Ascomycetes Americae borealis. H. Rehm. Jour. Mycol. 2:175- 
178. Mar. 1904. 

Aspidium thelypteris, host to Uredinopsis atkinsonii P. Magn. n. 
sp. Hedwigia, 43:123. 24 Mar. 1904. 

Atkinson, Geo. F. Life history of Hypocrea elutacea. Bot. Gaz. 
40:401-416. PL XIV-XVI. Dec. 1905. 

Atkinson, Geo. F. The Genera Balansia and Dothlichloe in the 
United States with a consideration of their economic im¬ 
portance. Jour. Mycol. 11:248-267. PI. 81-88. Nov. 1905. 

Bacterial Nomenclature and Classifications [Erwin F. Smith] 
in Bacteria in Relation to Plant Diseases, 1:54~i77. Sept. 
1905. 

Baeodromus Arthur gen. nov. Uredinaceae. Ann. Mycolog. 
3:19. Feb. 1905. 

Baeodromus californicus Arthur n. sp., on Senecio douglasii DC. 
Ann. Mycolog. 3:19. Feb. 1905. 

Baeodromus holwayi Arthur n. sp., on leaves of Senecio cinerari- 
oides H. B. K. [Mexico.] Ann. Mycolog. 3:19. Feb. 1905. 

Baeodromus Holwayi Arth., a New Uredineous Fungus from 
Mexico. J. C. Arthur. Ann. Mycolog. 3:18-20. Feb. 1905. 

Balansia discoidea P. Hennings, [on Andropogon, Kansas. At¬ 
kinson.] Jour. Mycol. 11:255. Nov. 1905. 

Balansia hypoxylon (Pk.) Atkinson 11. n. [Epichloe hypoxylon 
Peck, Ephelis mexicana Berkeley, E. borealis E. & E., Hypo- 
crella hypoxylon Sacc. Syll. & Ellis p. p., Dothichloe hypoxy¬ 
lon Atkinson p. p.] Jour. Mycol. 11:254. Nov. 1905. 

Balansia, see Genera Balansia and Dothichloe . 

Balansia vorax (B. & C.) emend Atkinson. [Description. At¬ 
kinson.] Jour. Mycol. 11:255. Nov. 1905. 

Bates, J. M. Rust Notes for 1904. Jour. Mycol. 11:116. May 

l9 °5. 

Basswood, see Tilia americana .... 


March 1906] Index to North American Mycology 


71 


Bauhinia pringlei Wats., host to Uromyces bauhiniicola Arthur 
n. sp. Bot. Gaz. 39:389. June 1905. 

Bauhinia sp., host to Uromyces bauhiniicola Arthur n. sp. Bot. 
Gaz. 39:389. June 1905. 

* Bessey, Ernst A. Review of Contributions to the Knowledge 
of the False Mildews (Perenosporaceae), S. I. Rostovtsev. 
Jour. Mycol. 11:270-1. Nov. 1905. 

Bessey, Ernst A. Review of: Jeczewski, A. A., Yearbook of 
Information concerning Diseases and Injuries of Cultivated 
and Wild Economic Plants, First Year. 1903. pp. 166. St. 
Petersburg, 1904. Russian. Jour. Mycol. 11:170-9. July 
1905. 

Beardslee, H. C. The Amanitas of Sweden [nine species com¬ 
pared with the American representatives.] Jour. Mycol. 
11:212-6. Sept. 1905. 

Beardslee, H. C. The Rosy-spored Agarics or Rhodosporeae. 
[The genus Clitopilus.] Jour. Mycol. 11:100-110. PI. 
76-77. May 1905. 

Bignonia aequinoctialis L., host to Puccinia aequinoctialis Hol- 
way n. sp. [Cuba.] Ann. Mycolog. 3:22. Feb. 1905. 

Bjerkandera fragrans (Peck) Murrill n. n. [Polyporus frag- 
rans Peck.] Bull. Torr. Bot. Club, 32:636. Dec. 1905.- 

Bjerkandera, Karst. [Merisma Gill, non Pers., Myriadoporus 
Peck.] [Murrill.] Bull. Torr. Bot. Club, 32:633. Dec. 1905. 

Bjerkandera, see Polyporaceae of North America, XIII. The 
described species of ... . 

Bjerkandera synopsis [key] of the North American species. 
[Murrill.] Bull. Torr. Bot. Club, 32:633. Dec. 1905. 

Blackspot Canker and Blackspot Apple Rot. W. H. Lawrence. 
Jour. Mycol., 11:164-5. July 1905. 

Boletus aesculus flavae Schw., syn. of Agaricus aesculi q. v. 
Boletus confragosis Bolt., syn. of Agaricus confragosus (Bolt.) 
Murrill q. v. 

Boletus decipiens Schrad., syn. of Cerrena unicolor (Bull.) 
Murrill q. v. 

Boletus hirsutus Wulf. non Scop., syn. of Coriolus nigromargi- 
na tus q. v. 

Boletus nigromarginatus Schw., syn. of Coriolus nigromargina- 
tus q. v. 

Boletus pubescens Schum., syn. of Coriolus pubescens q. v. 
Boletus reticulatus Hook., syn. of Favolus tenuis q. v. 

Boletus tenuis Hook., syn. of Favolus tenuis q. v. 

Boletus unicolor Bull., syn. of Cerrena unicolor (Bull.) Mur¬ 
rill q. v. 


72 


Journal of Mycology 


[Vol. 12 


Boletus unicolor Schw., syn. of Trametes unicolor q. v. 

Bolentius rhodoxanthus (Schw.) Sumstine n. n. [Agaricus 
rhodoxanthus Schw., Gomphus rhodoxanthus Schw., Flam- 
mula rhodoxanthus Lloyd Myc. Notes, Paxillus flavidus 
Berk., P. paradoxus Cooke, Clitocybe pelletieri Lev., Flam- 
mula paradoxa Kalch., and F. tammi Fr.] Jour. Mycol. 
11:166. July 1905. 

Botryodiplodia amelanchieris Ellis & Fairm. n. sp., on dead 
twigs of Amelanchier. Jour. Mycol. 10:229. Sept. 1904. 

Bouteloua (Artheropogon) curtipendulus (Mx.) [Mexico], 
host to Puccinia exasperans Holway n. sp. Ann. Mycolog. 
3:21. Feb. 1905. 

Bouteloua pringlei Scrib., host to Puccinia exasperans Holway 
n. sp. [Mexico.] Ann. Mycolog. 3:21. Feb. 1905. 

Brodiaea capitata, host to Puccinia moreniana Dudley & Thomp¬ 
son n. sp. Jour. Mycol. 10:53. 1904. 

Brodiaea capitata, host to Puccinia nodosa Ell. & Hark. Jour. 
Mycol. 10:53. Mar. 1904. 

Caesalpinia pulcherrima Sw., seePoinciana pulcherrima L ..... 
Californian Uredineae [Dudley and Thompson], see Notes 
on . 

Calliospora Arthur n. gen. Urediniaceae. Bot. Gaz. 39:390. 
June 1905. 

Calliospora diphysae Arthdr n. sp., on Diphysa suberosa Wats., 
Mexico. Bot. Gaz. 39:391. June 1905. 

Calliospora farlowii Arthur n. sp., on Parosela domingensis 
(DC.) Heller (Dalea domingensis DC.), Mexico. Bot. Gaz. 
39:391. June 1905. 

Calliospora holwayi Arthur n. sp., on Eysenhardtia amorphoides 
H. B. K. and E. orthocarpa Wats., Mexico. Bot. Gaz. 39:390. 
June 1905. 

Calonectria (Chiajaea) atkinsonii Rehm n. sp. Ann. Mycolog. 
2:178. Mar. 1904. 

Canavalia ensiformis D. C., host to Ceratelium canavaliae Ar- 
thus n. sp. [Porto Rica.] Bull. Torr. Bot. Club, 33:30. Jan. 
1906. 

Cantharellus cigarius, the Chantarelle. W. N. Clute. Am. 
Bot., 7:101-2. 1 pi. 1905. 

Carduus hookerianum (Nutt.) Heller, host to Aecidium cardui 
Arthur n. sp. Bull. Torr. Bot. Club, 33 :33. Jan. 1906. 

Carex aquatilis, host to Puccinia caricis (Schum.) Reb. [Ar¬ 
thur.] Jour. Mycol. 12:15. Jan. 1906. 

Carex stipata, host to Puccinia caricis (Schum.) Reb. [Arthur.] 
Jour. Mycol. 12:15. Jan. 1906. 


March 1906] Index to North American Mycology 


73 


Carpinus americana, inner bark, host to Dermatella scotinus 
Morgan n. sp. Jour. Mycol. 10:98. May 1904. 

Caryosopra cariosa Fairman n. sp., on very hard blackened areas 
in carious cavities of beech firewood (Fagus). Proc. Roch¬ 
ester Acad. Sci. 4:190. 2 Sept. 1905. 

Cassia (or Caesalpinia) sp., host to Ravenelia inconspicua Ar¬ 
thur n. sp. Bot. Gaz. 39:395. June 1905. 

Cedar, see Red Cedar .... 

Celtis, decorticated wood, host to Nummularia fuscella Rehm m 
sp. Ann. Mycolog. 2:176. Mar. 1904. 

Cephalanthus occidentals, decorticated branch, host to Lophio- 
stoma cephalanthi Fairman n. sp. Jour. Mycol. 10:231. 
Sept. 1904. 

Cephalanthus occidentalis, host to Pyrenopeziza cephalanthi 
Fairman n. sp. Jour. Mycol. 10:229. Sept. 1904. 

Ceratelium Arthur gen. nov. Uredineae. Bull. Torr. Bot. Club, 
33 :30. Jan. 1906. 

Ceratelium canavaliae Arthur n. sp., on Canavalia ensiformis 
DC. [Porto Rico.] Bull. Torr. Bot. Club, 33:30. Jan. 
1906. 

Cercis canadensis, dead limbs, host to Haplosporella cercidis E. 
& B. Jour. Mycol. 11:108. May 1905. 

Cerrena, see Polyporaceae of North America X ... . 

Cerrena unicolor (Bull.) Murrill. [Boletus unicolor Bull., B. 
decipiens Schrad., Sistotrema cinereum Pers., Daedalea uni¬ 
color Fr., Phyllodontia magnusii Karst.] Bull. Torr. Bot. 
Club, 32:97. Feb. 1905. 

Chaetosphaera, A. New. A. P. Morgan. Jour. Mycol. 11:105. 
May 1905. 

Chaetosphaera ludens Morgans n. sp., growing on old wood of 
Acer. Jour. Mycol. 11:105. May 1905. 

Chantarelle, (Cantharellus cibarius). W. N. Clute. Am. Bot., 
7:101-2. 1 pi. 1905. 

Christman, A. H. Sexual Reproduction in the Rusts. Bot. 
Gaz. 39:267-275. PI. VIII. April 1905. 

Christman, A. H. Variability in our common species of Dic- 
tvophora. Jour. Mycol. 10:101-108. May 1904. 

Cirsium hookerianum Nutt., host to Aecidium cardui Arthur n. 
sp. Bull. Torr. Bot. Club, 33 :33. Jan. 1906. 

Clavacia myceliosa Peck n. sp., among fallen leaves and twigs 
under redwood trees. Bull. Torr. Bot. Club, 31 :i82. Apr. 
1904. 

Clavaria simplex Schmiedel p. p., syn of Podostroma alutacea 
q. v. 


74 


Jouryial of Mycology 


[Vol. 12 


Clements, Frederic E. Translation of Saccardo’s De Diagnos- 
tica et Nomenclatura mycologica; Admonita quaedam. Jour. 
Mycol. 10:109-112. May 1904. 

Clevenger, Joseph F. Notes on Some North American Phyl- 
lachoras. Jour. Mycol. 11:159-164. PI. 79. July 1905. 
Clitocybe piceina Peck. n. sp., under spruce trees. Bull. Torr. 

Bot. Club, 31 :i78. Apr. 1904. 

Clitocybe pelletieri Lev., syn. of Boletinus rhodoxanthus q. v. 
Clitopilus, see Rosy-spored Agarics [ Beardslee ] .... 

Clitopilus, Key to the common species [Beardslee]. Jour. Mycol. 
11:109. May 1905. 

Clitopilus sphaerosporus Peck n. sp. Bull. Torr. Bot. Club, 
31 M79. Apr. 1904. 

Clitoria mexicana Link., host to Uromyces clitoriae Arthur n. 

sp. Bot. Gaz. 39:389. June 1905. 

Clute, W. N. The Chantarelle (Cantharellus cibarius). Am. 
Bot. 7:101-2. 1 pi. 1905. 

Clypeosphaeria pseudobufonia Rehm n. sp., ad cortem Quercus. 
Ann. Mycolog. 2:176. Mar. 1904. 

Coleosporium eupatorii Arthur n. sp., on Eupatorium macro- 
phyllum L., and Eupatorium sp., [Cuba]. Bull. Torr. Bot. 
Club, 33:31. Jan. 1906. 

Cockerell, T. D. A. A new Hypholoma [H. pecosense]. Jour. 
Mycol. 10:108. May 1904. 

Cockerell, T. D. A. Some Fungi collected in New Mexico. 
[List of 46 species.] Jour. Mycol. 10:49-51. Mar. 1904. 

Collybia radicata, Abnormal, see Minor Mycological Notes, 
III ... . 

Collybia umbonata Peck n. sp., on and about old redwood stumps. 
Bull. Torr. Bot. Club, 31:178. Ap. 1904. 

Cologania congesta Rose, host to Uromyces cologaniae Arthur 
n. sp. Bot. Gaz. 39:387. June 1905. 

Cologania pulchella H. B. K., host to Uromyces cologaniae Ar¬ 
thur 11. sp. Bot. Gaz. 39:387. June 1905. 

Cologania sp., host to Uromyces cologaniae Arthur n. sp. Bot. 
Gaz. 39:387. June 1905. 

Comptonia asplenifolia Gaertn., see Comptonia peregrina . . . . 

Comptonia peregrina (L.) Coult. (C. asplenifolia Gaertn.), host 
to Cronartium comptoniae Arthur n. sp. Bull. Torr. Bot. 
Club, 33:29. Jan. 1906. 

Coniothecium erumpens Sacc. et Syd. n. sp., in caulibus Meno- 
dorae scopariae. Ann. Mycolog. 2:173. Mar. 1904. 

Coprinus stanfordianus Copleand n. sp., on ground in arbore¬ 
tum. Ann. Mycolog. 2:1. Jan. 1904. 


March 1906 ] Index to North America?i Mycology 


75 


Cordyceps alutacea Link., syn. of Podostroma alutacea q. v. 

Cortinarii, Partial Key to the Cortinarii of Ithaca, N. Y. 
[Kauffman.] Bull. Torr. Bot. Club, 32:318-321. June 1905. 

Cronartium comptoniae Arthur n. sp., on Comptonia peregrina 
(L.) Coult. (C. asplenifolia Gaertn.) and Myrica gale L. 
Bull. Torr. Bot. Club, 33 129. Jan. 1906. 

Cryptogramme stelleri (Gmel.) Prantl, host to Hyalospora pel- 
laeicola Arthur n. sp. Bull. Torr. Bot. Club, 33130. Jan. 
1906. 

Coriolus, see Polyporaceae of North America, XIII. The de¬ 
scribed species of ... . 

Coriolus, synopsis [key] of the North American species. [Mur- 
rill.] Bull. Torr. Bot. Club, 32:641. Dec. 1905. 

Coriolus albo-cervinus Pat., syn. of Coriolus hr achy pus q. v. 

Coriolus brachypus (Lev.) Murrill n. n. [Polyporus brachypus 
Lev., P. albo-cervinus Berk., Coriolus albo-cervinus Pat.] 
Bull. Torr. Bot. Club, 32:646. Dec. 1905. 

Coriolus arenicolor (B. & C.) Murrill n. n. [Polyporus areni- 
color B. & C.] Bull. Torr. Bot. Club, 32:652. Dec. 1905. 

Coriolus flabellum (Mont.) Murrill n. n. [Polyporus flabellum 
Mont.] Bull. Torr. Bot. Club, 32:648. Dec. 1905. 

Coriolus hirtellus (Fr.) Murrill n. n. [Polystictus hirtellus Fr.] 
Bull. Torr. Bot. Club, 32:652. Dec. 1905. 

Coriolus hirsutulus (Schw.) Murrill n. n. [Polyporus hirsutu- 
lus Schw.] Bull. Torr. Bot. Club, 32:643. Dec. 1905. 

Coriolus ilicincola (B. & C.) Murrill n. n. [Polyporus ilicin- 
cola B. & C.] Bull. Torr. Bot. Club, 32:647. Dec. 1905. 

Coriolus nigromarginatus (Schw.) Murrill n. n. [Boletus hir- 
sutus Wulf. non Scop., B. nigromarginatus Schw., Polyporus 
hirsutus Fr.] Bull. Torr. Bot. Club, 32:649. Dec. 1905. 

Coriolus planellus Murrill n. n. [Polyporus planus Peck.] Bull. 
Torr. Bot. Club, 32:649. Dec. 1905. 

Coriolus pubescens (Schum.) Murrill n. n. [Boletus pubescens 
Schum., Polyporus pubescens Fr., Leptoporus pubescens 
Pat.] Bull. Torr. Bot. Club, 32:645. Dec. 1905. 

Coriolus sartwellii (B. & C.) Murrill n. n. [Polyporus sart- 
wellii B. & C.] Bull. Torr. Bot. Club, 32:646. Dec. 1905. 

Coriolus sericeo-hirsutus (Kl.) Murrill n. n. ]Polyporus sericeo- 
hirsutus Kl., Hexagona sericea Fr., Polystictus barbatulus 
Fr.] Bull. Torr. Bot. Club, 32:651. Dec. 1905. 

Coriolus sobrius (B. & C.) Murrill n. n. [Polyporus sobrius B. 
& C.] Bull. Torr. Bot. Club, 32:649. Dec. 1905. 

Coriolus subluteus (E. & E.) Murrill n. n. [Polyporus sublu- 
teus Ell. & Ev.] Bull. Torr. Bot. Club, 32:646. Dec. 1905. 


76 


Journal of Mycology 


[Vol. 12' 


Coriolus sullivantii (Mont.) Murrill n. n. [Polyporus sulli- 
vantii Mont.] Bull. Torr. Bot. Club, 32:650. Dec. 1905. 

Coriolus tener (Lev.) Murrill n. n. [Polyporus tener Lev.] 
Bull. Torr. Bot. Club, 32:653. Dec. 1905. 

Cornus, dead branches, host to Pleospora atromaculans Rehm n. 

sp. Ann. Mycolog. 2:177. Mar. 1904. 

Cortinarius, the genus: a preliminary study. Calvin Henry 
Kauffman. Bull. Torr. Bot. Club, 32 :30i-325. 7 figs. June 
1905. 

Cortinarius atkinsonianus Kauffman n. sp., among hemlocks 
and spruces. Bull. Torr. Bot. Club, 32:324. June 1905. 

Cortinarius braendlei Peck n. sp., among fallen leaves in woods.. 

Bull. Torr. Bot. Club, 32:79. Feb. 1905. 

Cortinarius croceocolor Kauffman n. sp., in mixed woods. Bull. 

Torr. Bot. Club, 32 :323. June 1905. 

Cortinarius cylindriceps Kauffman n. sp., under hemlock trees. 
Bull. Torr. Bot. Club, 32:321. June 1905. 

Cortinarius deceptivus Kauffman n. sp., in hemlock woods.. 
Bull. Torr. Bot. Club, 32:325. June 1905. 

Cortinarius morissii Peck n. sp., moist shady places under hem¬ 
lock trees. Bull. Torr. Bot. Club, 32 79. Feb. 1905. 
Cortinarius olivaceo-stramineus Kauffman n. sp. Bull. Torr. 
Bot. Club, 32:322. June 1905. 

Cortinarius sterilis Kauffman 11. sp., low places near sphagnum 
swamps. Bull. Torr. Bot. Club, 32:321. June 1905. 

Cortinarius umidicola Kauffman n. sp., under a clump of hem¬ 
lock trees. Bull. Torr. Bot. Club, 32 722. June 1905. 

Crataegus sp., stems, host to Dermatea crataegicola Durand n. 
sp. Jour. Mycol. 10:100. May 1904. 

Culture experiments, Puccinia sorghi, [Kellerman], 1905, see 

Uredineous .... 

Cultures of Uredineae in 1905. [6th An. Report.] J. C. Arthur. 
Jour. Mycol. 12:11-27. J an - 1906. 

Cystidia, function of, in Coprinus [Copeland]. Ann. Mycolog. 
2 7. Jan. 1904. 

Daedalea albida Schw., syn. of Agaricus confragosus (Bolt.) 
Murrill q. v. 

Daedalea ambigua Berk., syn. of Agaricus aesculi q. v. 

Daedalea confragosa Pers., syn. of Agaricus confragosus (Bolt.) 
Murrill q. v. 

Daedalea corrugata Kl., syn. of Agaricus confragosus (Bolt.y 
Murrill q. v. 

Daedalea deplanta Fr., syn. of Agaricus deplanatus q. v. 


March 1906] Index to North American Mycology 


77 


Daedalea discolor Fr., syn. of Agaricus confragosus (Bolt.) 
Murrill q. v. 

Daedalea discolor KL, syn. of Agaricus confragosus (Bolt.) 
Murrill q. v. 

Dalea domingensis DC., see Parosela domingensis .... 
Daedalea elegans Spreng., syn. of Agaricus deplanatus q. v. 

Daldinia eschscholzii (Ehrenbg.) Rehm, ad lignum putridum. 

Ann. Mycolog. 2:175. Mar. 1904. 

Davis, B. M. Fertilization in the Saprolegniales. Bot. Gaz. 
39:61-4. Jan. 1905. 

Daedalea glaberrima B. & C., syn. of Agaricus aesculi q. v. 
Daedalea Pers., [Murrill], syn. of Agaricus (Dill.) L. Bull. 
Torr. Bot. Club, 32:83. Feb. 1905. 

Daedalea quercina Pers., syn. of Agaricus quercinus q. v. 

Daedalea quercina var. nigricans Fr., syn. of Agaricus quercina 
q. v. 

Daedalea rubescens A. & S., syn. of Agaricus confragosus 
(Bolt.) Murrill q. v. 

Daedaleopsis Schroet., [Murrill], syn. of Agaricus (Dill.) L. 

Bull. Torr. Bot. Club, 32 :83. Feb. 1905. 

Daedalea unicolor Fr., syn. of Cerrena unicolor (Bull.) Murrill 
q. v. 

Daedalea zonata Schw., syn. of Agaricus confragosa (Bolt.) 
Murrill q. v. 

Dairy Fungi, Some Suggestions from the study of. Charles 
Thom. [Plan for obtaining more definite knowledge of the 
forms.] Jour. Mycol. 11:117-124. May 1905. 

Danthonia spicata, host to Balansia hypoxylon (Pk.) Atkinson. 

Jour. Mycol. 11:255. Nov. 1905. 

Delphinium albescens Rydb., host to Aecidium batesianum 
Barth, n. sp. Fungi Columbiani No. 1901. 

Dendrophagus Murrill non Tourney, syn. of Tomophagus q. v . 

Dendrophagus colossus (Fr.) Murrill, syn. of Tomophagus 
colossus q. v. 

Dermatea crataegicola Durand n. sp., on stems of Crataegus sp. 
Jour. Mycol. 10:100. May 1904. 

Dermatea puberula Durand n. sp., on dead stem of Vitis sp. 
Jour. Mycol. 10:101. May 1904. 

Dermatella scotinus Morgan n. sp., on Carpinus americana, 
growing out of the inner bark tirough the periderm. Jour. 
Mycol. 10:98. May 1904. 

Dichromena ciliata Vahl., host to Uredo dichromenae Arthur 
n. sp. [Porto Rico.] Bull. Torr. Bot. Club, 33:31. Jan. 
1906. 


78 


Journal of Mycology 


[Vol. 12 


Dichromena radicans Cham. & Schl., host to Uredo dichromenae 
Arthur n. sp. [Porto Rico.] Bull. Torr. Bot. Club, 33:31. 
Jan. 1906. 

Dictyophora, Variability in our common species of. A. H. 
Christman. Jour. Mycol. 10:101-108. May 1904. 

Didymosphaeria cryptosphaerioides Rehm n. sp., ad corticem 
Mesquite). Ann. Mycolog. 2:176. Mar. 1904. 

Diorchidium boutelouae Jennings, syn. of Puccinia boutelouae 
q. v. 

Diphysa suberosa Wats., host to Calliospora diphysae Arthur n. 
sp. Bot. Gaz. 39:391. June 1905. 

Discomycetes, Three New Species of. Elias J. Durand. Jour. 
Mycol. 10:99-101. May 1904. 

Diseases — Disease Resistance of Potatoes, Plant Diseases in 
Vermont in 1904, Potato Diseases and their remedies. [Ex¬ 
periments and general account; not taxonomic.] L. R. Jones 
and W. J. Morse. An. Rep. Vermont Agr. Exp. Sta., 18: 
264-291. 1905. 

Dolichos reticulata Hochst., Aguacate, host to Puccinia dolochi 
Arthur n. sp. [Cuba.] Bull. Torr. Bot. Club, 32:28. Jan. 
1906. 

Dolicholus taxanus (T. & G.) Vail (Rhynchosia texana T. & 
G.), host to Uromyces dolicholis Arthur n. sp. Bull. Torr. 
Bot. Club, 33127. Jan. 1906. 

Dothichloe aristidae Atkinson. [Description and notes] on 
Aristida purpurascens, A. dichotoma. Jour. Mycol. 12:261. 
Nov. 1905. 

Dothichloe atramentosa (B. & C.) Atkinson n. n. [Hypocrea 
atramentosa B. & C., Dothidea vorax B. & C. p. p., D. atra- 
mentaria B. & C., Hypocrella atramentosa Sacc., POphio- 
dothis vorax var. atramentaria Sacc. Syll., Dothidia atra- 
mentaria E. & E., Hypocrella hypoxylon E. & E. & Ellis 
N. A. Pyr. p. p., Dothichloe hypoxylon Atkinson p. p.] Jour. 
Mycol., 11:260. Nov. 1905. 

Dothichloe hypoxylon Atkinson p. p., syn . of Dothichloe atra¬ 
mentosa q. v. 

Dothichloe hypoxylon Atkinson p. p., syn. of Balansia hypoxy¬ 
lon q. v. 

Dothichloe, see Genera Balansia and Dothichloe .... 

PDothidea atramentaria E. & E. N. A. F., syn. of Dothichloe 
atramentosa q. v. 

PDothidea atramentaria Rav. Fung. Am., syn. of Dothichloe 
atramentosa q. v. 

Dothidea atramentaria B. & C., syn. of Dothichloe atramentosa 
q. v. 


March 1906] Index to North American Mycology 


79 


Dothidea vorax B. & C. p. p., syn. of Dothichloe atramentosa 
q. v. 

Dothidella minima Sacc. et Syd. n. sp., in foliis languidis 
Arundinariae macrospermae. Ann. Mycolog. 2:164. Mar. 

1904. 

Dudley,, W. R. and Thompson, C. H. Notes on Californian 
Uredineae and Descriptions of New Species. Jour. Mycol. 
10:52-5. Mar. 1904. 

Durand, Elias J. Three New Species of Discomycetes. Jour. 
Mycol. 10:99-101. May 1904. 

Durand, Elias J. Peziza fusicarpa Ger. and Peziza semitosta B. 

& C. Jour. Mycol. 12:28-32. Jan. 1906. 

Egg Plant Fungus, see New [Ascochyta lycopersici Brun .] . . . . 

Elementary Mycology. W. A. Kellerman. Jour. Mycol. 10:95- 
5. Mar. 1904. 

Elementary Mycology, continued. W. A. Kellerman. Jour. 
Mycol. 10:144-9. May 1904. 

Ellis, J. B. and Bartholomew, E. Two New Haplosporellas. 
Jour. Mycol. 11:108. May 1905. 

Ellis, J. B. and Kellerman, W. A. A New Phyllachora from 
Mexico. Jour. Mycol. 10:231-2. Sept. 1904. 

Entoloma plumbeum Earle n. sp., on old pastures. Bull. N. Y. 

Bot. Gar., 3:298. 14 April 1905. 

Epichloe hypoxylon Peck, syn. of Balansia hypoxylon q. v. 

Epilobium alpinum, host to Puccinia scandica Johans. Ann. 
Mycolog. 3 :23. Feb. 1905. 

Epilobium clavatum, host to Puccinia scandica Johans. Ann. 
Mycolog. 3 :23. Feb. 1905. 

Ephelis borealis E. & E., syn. of Balansia hypoxylon q. v. 
Ephelis mexicana Berk., syn. of Balansia hypoxylon q. v. 
Eragrostis glomerata (Walt.) Dewey, host to Tilletia eragrosti- 
dis Clinton & Ricker n. sp. Jour. Mycol. 11:111. May 

1905. 

Erysiphaceae of Washington, Notes on. W. H. Lawrence. 
Jour. Mycol. 11:106-8. May 1905. 

Eucalyptus, host to Lachnum atropurpureum Durand n. sp. 
Jour. Mycol. 10:100. May 1904. 

Eupatorium sp., host to Coleosporium eupatorii Arthur n. sp. 
[Cuba.] Bull. Torr. Bot. Club, 33:31. Jan. 1906. 

Eupatorium macrophyllum L., host to Coleosporium eupatorii 
Arthur n. sp. [Cuba.] Bull. Torr. Bot. Club, 33:31. Jan. 

1906. 

Eupatorium nubigenum, host to Septoria albo-maculans Syd. n. 
sp. Ann. Mycolog. 2:171. Mar. 1904. 

{To be continued.) 


so 


Journal of Mycology 


[Vol. 12 


NOTES FROM MYCOLOGICAL LITERATURE, XVIII. 

W. A. KELLERMAN. 

The mycological articles in Centralblatt f. Bakt. Para- 
sitenk. u. Infektionskr., Zweite Abteilung, XIII Band, 1904, are: 
Chester, Frederick D., A review of the Bacillus subtilis group of 
bacteriaffi Diiggeli, Max, Die Bakterienflora gesunder Samen und 
daraus gezogener Keimpflanzschen. (Forts, u. Schluss) ; Har¬ 
rison, F. C., A bacterial disease of cauliflower (Brassica cleracea) 
and allied plants; Laubert, R., Beitrag zur Kenntnis des Gloeo- 
sporium der roten Johannisbeere; Lepeschkin, W. W., Zur 
Kenntnis der Erblichkeit bei den einzelligen Organismen, Die 
Verzweigung und Mycelbildung bei einer Bakterie (Bacillus) 
Berestnewi n. sp. [Schluss.] ; Metcalf, Haven, Bacterium teut- 
lium sp. nov.; Saito, K., Eine neue Art der “Chinesischen Hefe;” 
Semadini, Franc. Ottavio, Beitrage zur Kenntnis der Umbellif- 
eren bewohnenden Puccinien; Smith, Erwin F., Ursache der 
Cobbschen Krankheit des Zuckerrohrs; Uyeda, Y., On the To¬ 
bacco Wilt Disease caused by a Bacteria (Preliminary Notice). 

The mycological articles in Hedwigia, Band XLV, 
Heft I, 14 Okt. 1905, are: Dritter Beitrag zur Pilzflora des 
Gouvernements Moskau, von P. Hennings [a long list with about 
eight new species described] ; and Ueber Tracya hydrocharidis 
Lagerh. von E. Reukauf-Weimar [with figures of a section of a 
spore ball bearing conidia, conidia fusing, mycelium fusing, etc.]. 

The Lycoperdaceae of Australia, New Zealand and 
Neighboring Islands, illustrated with 15 plates and 49 figures, 
by C. G. Lloyd, has been issued from Cincinnati at the Lloyd Li¬ 
brary, bearing date of April 1905. Australia is regarded by Mr. 
Lloyd as the richest country in the world in Lycoperdaceae; he 
says more strange and endemic genera are found there than in any 
other continent. This forty-two-page pamphlet gives descriptive 
notes and illustrations of the known species of that region. It 
is introduced by a brief characterization of the group Gastromy- 
cetes and its four families, Phalloideae, Nidulariaceae, Hymeno- 
gastraceae, Lycoperdaceae. 

Erwin F. Smith is the author of Bacteria in Relation 
to Plant Diseases, Volume One (Methods of work and general 
literature of Bacteriology exclusive of Plant Diseases) which is 
Publication No. 27 of the Carnegie Institution of Washington, 
September 1905. It is a splendid volume of 285 pages, admir¬ 
ably illustrated, and even the taxonomic mycologist will inspect 
it witfi interest and profit The chapter on Nomenclature and 
Classifications will challenge closest scrutiny. Dr. Smith pro¬ 
poses one new genus, having for its type Bacillus anthracis Cohn. 
He says this volume is not intended to take the place of 


March 1906 ] Notes from Mycological Literature 81 

ordinary text-books of bacteriology, but rather to supplement the 
same, giving information where they are silent or misleading. 
That a modest claim is made is indicated by the quotation in the 
preface: “Man would never give anything to the public if he 
waited till he had reached the goal of his undertaking, which is 
ever appearing close at hand and yet slipping farther and farther 
as he draws nearer.” 

Charles E. Fairman publishes the Pyrenomyceteae of 
Orleans County, N. Y., in the Proceedings of the Rochester 
Academy of Science, vol. 4, pp. 165-191, figs. 1-6, Sept. 2, 1905. 
It is a fourth paper in the series of this author on the cellular 
cryptogams of that region. The Nos. are carried from 200 to 
354, notes are given and the following new species are described: 
Lophiostoma imperfecta, Valsaria acericola, Anthostoma aceri- 
num, Melanomma juniperi, and Caryospora cariosa. 

Of the papers published in Bulletin de Societe Imperiale 
des Naturalistes de Moscou, 1904, N. S. tome XVIII, we find the 
following of interest to the mycologists: Nachtraegliche Bemerk- 
ungen zur Verbreitung der Fungi hypogaei in Russland von Fedor 
Bucholdtz. About one and a half dozen species are reported, ac¬ 
companied with notes and comments. 

A NEW EDITION OR RATHER A RECENT REPRINT (1905) of the 

Mushroom Book by Nina L. Marshall, publishers Doubleday, 
Page & Co., contains, in addition to former half-tones also the 
following new illustrations, namely, Amanitopsis strangulata, My- 
cena galericulata, Lepiota granosa, Collybia maculata, Collvbia 
platyphylla, Clitocybe illudens, Agaricus campestris, Cortinarius 
caninus, Cortinarius armillatus, Hydnum coralloides, Clavaria 
ligula, Strobilomyces strobilaceus, Boletus felleus obesus, Boletus 
scaber niveus, Elfvingia fomentaria, Calostoma (four species, col¬ 
ored), Leotia lubrica, Tremellodon gelatinosum, Peziza aurantia 
(colored), Peziza odorata (colored), and Panus strigosus. 

Ernest S. Salmon, On the present Aspect of the Epi¬ 
demic of the American Gooseberry-Mildew in Europe, Jour. 
Roy. Hort. Soc. 29:102-110, Dec. 1904, shows with the aid of a 
map that at about a dozen and a half localities in Ireland and in 
Russia this Fungus occurs. Prof. Rostrup reports it also in Den¬ 
mark. This disease was introduced into Europe from America 
about the year 1900. 

Some Diseases of the Potato, by George Massee, in the 
Journal of the Royal Horticultural Society, vol. XXIX, Parts 1-3. 
Dec. 1904, pp. 139-145, is a popular illustrated article dealing; 
with Phytophthora infestans DeBary, Winter-rot (Nectria solani 
Pers.), Black Scab (Oedomyces leproides Trabut), Bacterial Dis¬ 
ease (Bacillus solanacearum Smith), Potato Scab (Sorosporium 
scabies Fisch.). 


82 


Journal of Mycology 


[Vol. 1 % 


The Fungoid Pests of the Vinery and Stove, M. C 
Cooke, in Jour. Roy. Hort. Soc. 28:313-337, May 1904, popular, 
is accompanied by three colored plates illustrating thirty-three 
species. 

In Pests of Orchard and Fruit Garden, Jour. Roy.. 
Hort. Soc. 28:1-43, Oct. 1903, by M. C. Cooke, the three col¬ 
ored plates show spores, etc., of forty-three species. 

Joseph Charles Arthur publishes in the Bulletin of 
the Torrey Botanical Club for Jan. 1906 (33:27-341) New 
Species of Uredineae, IV, from various localities as Porto Rico,. 
Cuba, Mexico, and the United States. One species is a Uromyces,. 
one Hyalospora, one Ceratelium, one Coleosporium, one Uredo 
and four Aecidiums. The genus Ceratelium is new, and one spe¬ 
cies is described ’on Canavalia from Porto Rico. “An especially 
interesting rust on account of the combination of a melampsora- 

ceous fungus with a leguminous host.Except in the 

length of the telial column, there is considerable resemblance to 
Cronartium.” In the descriptions Dr. Arthur has made use of 
the terms (lately proposed by him) pycnium , aecium, uredineum 
and telium , instead of spermogonium, aecidium, uredo and teleuto- 
spores. 

P. Hennings enumerates a long list of fungi, including 
many new species, from eastern Africa, under the title Fungi 
Africae orientalis, the first part of which appeared May 22, 1900,, 
and the second part 18 Nov. 1902, in Engler’s Botanischer Jahr- 
bucher, vols. 28 and 33. The new genera Engleromyces and 
Busseella are there described. 

The original articles in 4E Fascicule (Tome XXI) of 
the Bulletin Mycologique de France, issued 31 Dec. 1905, 
are: R. Maire, Flore mycologique des iles Baleares (avec fig.) y 
G. Bainier, Acrostalagmus roseus Bain, et Nemotogonum album 
Bain. (PI. XII et XIII) ; F. Gueguen, Gliomastix (Torula) 
chartarum n. gen. et n. sp. (PI. XIV et XV) ; F. Gueguen, 
Quelques mots sur les Aspergillus pathogenes. 

An exhaustive study of the Life History of Hypocrea 
alutacea is published by Geo. F. Atkinson in the Dec (1905) 
No. of the Botanical Gazette (40:401-416), illustrated by three 
full page half tones. He unites Bresadola’s H. lloydii with this 
species and the new name necessary in the light of present knowl¬ 
edge is formed as follows: Podostroma alutaceum (Pers.) At¬ 
kinson. Professor Atkinson satisfied himself that the American 
plants are identical with European ones not only by an examina¬ 
tion of exsiccata Rab, F. Eur. 132 and 246, but also by an 
inspection in Paris in 1905 of the specimens of Hypocrea alutacea 
in the herbarium of the Museum of Paris among which were 
some specimens from Tulasne’s herbarium. 


March 1906 ] Notes from Mycological Literature 83 » 

An Index to Volumes i-io, Journal of Mycology, occu¬ 
pied the entire space, pp. 289-387, of the November Number 1904. 

The may No., 1905, Journal of Mycology, had the fol¬ 
lowing table of contents: Morgan, A New Chaetosphaeria; 
Lawrence, Notes on the Erysiphaceae of Washington; Ellis and 
Bartholomew, Two New Haplosporellas; Beardslee, The Rosy- 
spored Agarics; Ricker, Notes on Fungi, II, New Species; Bates, 
Rust Notes for 1904; Thom, Suggestions from the Study of 
Dairy Fungi; Kellerman, Index to North American Mycology; 
Notes from Mycological Literature, XV; Editor’s Notes. 

An interesting new genus is proposed by M. F. Gue'- 
guen in the Bulletin de la Societe Mycologique de France, tome 
XXI, 4e Fascicule, under the title Gliomastix (Torula) charta- 
rum n. gen. n. sp.; contribution a l’etude de la formation en- 
dogene des conidies. As to name and place in systematic classi¬ 
fication he says: Je donne a ce genre nouveau le nom de Glio¬ 
mastix Gr. gloios visqueux; mastix fouet, qui rappelle l’etat 
mucilagineaux de ses conidies. Ce genre est aux Torula ce que 
sont les Gliocladium aux Penicillium , et les Gliocephalis aux 
S' terigmato cystis. 

In the September (1905) No. of the Journal of My¬ 
cology the articles were as follows: Morgan, North American 
Species of Marasmius; Beardslee, The Amanitas of Sweden; 
Kellerman, Index to North American Mycology; Editor’s Notes. 

The following is the table of contents in the Journal 
of Mycology for November 1905: Morgan, North American 
Species of Marasmius; Atkinson, The Genera Balansia and Doth- 
ichloe in the United States, with a Consideration of their Eco¬ 
nomic Importance; Sumstine, Another Fly Agaric; Holway, 
Notes on Uredineae; Sturgis, Remarkable Occurrence of Mor- 
chella Esculenta (L.) Pers.; Bessey, Rostovtsev, S. J., Con¬ 
tributions to the Knowledge of the False Mildews (Peronospora- 
ceae) ; Kellerman, Notes from Mycological Literature XVII; 
Index to Volume 11. 

Uredineae Japonicae V, von P. Dietel, Eng. Bot. Jahrb, 
34:583-592, 20 Jan. 1905, lists about four dozen Rusts, a large 
number of them being new species with Latin diagnoses. 

P. Hennings gives a fifth installment of Japan Fungi 
— Fungi Japonici, V — in Engler’s Botanischer Jahrbiicher, 34; 
592-606, 20 Jan. 1905, enumerating a large number of species, of 
which about eight are new. 

Annales Mycologici, Vol. Ill, No. 1, Feb. 1905, has the 
following table of contents: Salmon, Ernest S., Cultural Experi¬ 
ments with an Oidium on Euonymus japonicus Linn, f.; Rick, 


84 


Journal of Mycology] 


[Vol. 12 


Fungi Austro-americano Fasc. II.; Arthur, J. C. Baeodromus 
Holwayi Arth., a New Uredineous Fungus from Mexico; Hol- 
way, E. W. D., North American Uredineae; Copeland, Edwin 
Bingham, Fungi esculentes Philippinenses; Trotter, A.,Ascochyta 
Salicorniae P. Magnus var. Salicorniae patulae Trotter; Kusano, 
S., Einege neue Taphrina-Arten aus Japan; Kuyper, H. P., Die 
Perithecien-Entwicklung von Monascus purpureus Went und 
Monascus Barkeri Dangeard, sowie die systematische Stellung 
dieser Pilze; Salmon, Ernest S., Preliminary Note on an Endo¬ 
phytic Species of the Erysiphaceae; Neue Literatur; Referate 
und kritische Besprechungen. 

Ernest S. Salmon gives an account of his cultural experi¬ 
ments with an Oidium on Euonymus japonicus Linn. f. in the 
Annales Mycologici, Februar 1905, 3:1-15, plate I. The species 
was indeterminable specifically since no production of perithecia 
was observed. In the course of the discussion a new term is pro¬ 
posed, namely, xenoparasitism, which the author defines as fol¬ 
lows : those cases where a form of a fungus which is specialized 
to certain host species and confined to them under normal circum¬ 
stances, proves able to infect injured parts of a strange host. 

Journal of Mycology, January, 1906, presented this table 
of contents: Morgan, North American Species of Marasmius; 
Kellerman, Uredineous Culture Experiments with Puccinia 
Sorghi, 1905; Arthur, Cultures of Uredineae in 1905; Durand, 
Peziza fusicarpa Ger. and Peziza semitosta B. & C.; Kellerman, 
Notes from Mycological Literature XVIII; Editor’s Notes. 

J. C. Arthur, Baeodromus Holwayi Arth., a New Ure¬ 
dineous Fungus from Mexico, Annales Mycologici, Feb. 1905, 
[3:18-20], gives an account of an interesting Rust collected by 
Professor Holway in central Mexico, alt. 3000-3400 metres, at a 
glance resembling a Leptopuccinia but the promycelium and large 
sporidia have bright orange contents. A new genus, Baeodro¬ 
mus is proposed for this Rust, the name derived from Greek 
baios, short, and dromus , course. As to to affinities the author 
says: “The relationship of these fungi is not clear. The gross 
appearance is that of the Pucciniaceae, and one might at first think 
that they belonged near the genus Kuehneola, yet the germination 
closely resembles that of the Coleosporiaceae. But from the com¬ 
pact structure of the sorus and the external promycelium, I am 
at present inclined to place the genus near Pucciniastrum, among 
the Melampsoraceae.” 

In Pests of the Ornamental Shrubbery, by C. M. 
Cooke, Jour. Roy. Hort. Soc. 29:1-25, PI. XVI-XVIII, Dec. 
1904, many species are popularly described and forty-six are illus¬ 
trated on three colored plates. 


March 1906 ] Notes from Mycological Literature 85 * 

Edible Fungi is the title of a popular article with a 
few text illustrations by M. C. Cooke on pp. 495-510 of the Jour¬ 
nal of the Royal Horticultural Society, vol. XXVIII, May 1904. 

F. S. Earle's Mycological Studies, II, in the Bulletin of 
the New York Botanical Garden, 3: (289)-(312), 14 April 1905, 
issued first as a Separate 30 June 1904, consists of New Species 
of West-American Fungi and New Tropical Fungi mostly from 
Porto Rico. The first contains 33 species and the second 18 
species. In the latter the genus Meliola received most species, 
ten new forms described. 

Annales Mycologici, vol. Ill, No. 5, October 1905, con¬ 
tains the following: Jaap, Otto, Beitrage zur Pilzflora von 
Mecklenburg; Hohnel, Franz v., Mycologische Fragmente; 
Rehm, Ascomycetes exs. Fasc. 35; Sydow, Mycotheca germanica 
Fasc. VIII-IX (No. 351-450) ; Vuillemin, P., Recherches sur les 
Champignons parasites des feuilles de Tilleul; Lind, J., Ueber 
einige neue und bekannte Pilze; Farneti, Rodolfo, Erpete fur- 
furacea delle pere; Bucholtz, Fedor, Verzeichnis der bisher in den 
Ostseeprovinzen Russlands bekannt gewordenen Puccinia-Arten; 
Neue Literatur; Referate und kritische Besprechungen. 

E. W. D. Holway, North American Uredineae, gives in 
Annales Mycologici for Feb. 1905 [3:20-4] descriptions of the 
following species: Puccinia exasperans (Mexico), P. gouaniae 
(Cuba), P. aequinoctialis (Cuba), P. distorta (Mexico), P. fu- 
mosa (Mexico), also critical notes on several other interesting 
species — saying that Sydow is in error in giving a new name 
to Puccinia kansensis (P. buchloes 1903) ; P. buchloes Schofield 
was published in 1902, a different species; Puccinia scandica 
Johans, hitherto known only from the alpine regions of Sweden, 
has been collected in Utah (A. O. Garrett) and in Washington 
(W. N. Suksdorf). 


AMERICAN MYCOLOGICAL SOCIETY, NEW ORLEANS 
MEETING, JANUARY 1, 1906. 

The American Mycological Society held its third annual 
meeting in connection with the American Association for the Ad¬ 
vancement of Science at New Orleans, January 1, 1906. 

In the absence of the President, Prof. Charles H. Peck, the 
Vice-President, Prof. F. S. Earle, presided. 

The new constitution recommended by the committees of the 
Botanical Society of America, the Society for Plant Morphology 
and Physiology, and the American Mycological Society, as a basis 
for the union of the three societies, was adopted and the present 



86 Journal of Mycology [Vol. 11 

officers continued as a committee with power to co-operate in the 
completion of the details of reorganization. 

The following program was presented: 

Some Reasons for Desiring a Better Classification of the 

Uredinales.J. C. Arthur 

Uredineae of the Gulf States.S. M. Tracy 

Some Peculiar Fungi New to America.W. G. Farlow 

North American Gill Fungi.F. S. Earle 

Lichens and Recent Conceptions of Species (read by title) 

. Bruce Fink 

The Affinities of the Fungus of Lolium temulentum. 

.E. M. Freeman 

Peridermium cerebrum Peck, and Cronartium Quercuum 


(Berkeley ) y .C. L. Shear 

Ramularia: An Illustration of the Present Practice in My- 

cological Nomenclature.C. L. Shear 

Notes on Cultures of Colletotrichum and Gloeosporium 


The Occurrence of Fusoma parasiticum Tubeuf in this 

Country.Perley Spaulding 

Notes on Pachyma cocos.P. H. Rolfe 

Pencillium glaucum on Pineapple Fruit.P. H. Rolfe 


C. L. Shear, Sec’y-Treas. 


Mr. Ellis accumulated a valuable working library on syste¬ 
matic Mycology and many issues of exsiccati, a part of which 
has alreay been disposed of. The books and specimens remain¬ 
ing, given in the following list, are for sale by his daughter. 

Books for Sale from the Library of J. B. Ellis : 

Berlese , A. N. Monographia dei generi Pleospora, Clathos- 
pora e Pyrenophora. 12 col. plates. (Firenze) 1888. $4. 

leones Fungorum ad usum Sylloges Saccardianae accom- 
mod.. Vol I. (5 fasc.) II. (5 fasc.) II. fasc. 1-4. 15. fasc. 1. 
Cum 567 tabulis color. Abellini et Patavii 1894-1902. 

Vol. 1. Pyrenomycetes (Lophiostomaceae et Sphaeriaceae 
Phaeo- et Hyalo-phragmiae. With 184 Taf. — II. Pyrenomy¬ 
cetes (Sphaeriaceae Phoeophragmiae, Dictyo- et Scolecosporae. 
With 188 Taf. — III. 1-4 Sphaeriaceae Allantosporae. With 127 
Taf. — IV. I. Phycomycetes. With 67 col. plates. 

Exsiccati. — One Set North American Fungi incomplete, 
lacking 13 Centuries, 2-5, 7, 8, 20-25, 29. $100. 

Exsiccati. — Fungi Columbiani. Cent. i-XIV. $84. 

Exsiccati. — Some odd Centuries of North American Fungi 
and Fungi Columbiani (unbound) ; as good in every respect as 
the Centuries in the complete sets, at per Century. $3. 















March 1806] American Mycological Society 


87 


Ellis, J. B., and B. M. Everhart. The North American 
Pyrenomycetes. With 41 plates. Newfield 1892. $5 net. 

Hedwigia 1875-1898, 15 vols. (bound). 

Roumeguere’s Revue Mycologique, 1879-1901, 9 vols. bound, 
the last 4 unbound. $30. 

Persoon, Mycologia Europaea. 3 vols. 8 vo. 30 colored 
plates. $15. 

Bresadola, Fungi Tridentini, vol. 1 (bound), 144 pp. and 95 
colored plates and 2 nos. of vol. 2 (unbound), 81 pp., 90 plates. 
$20. 

Cooke, M. C. Mycographia seu leones Fungorum. Fig¬ 
ures of Fungi from all parts of the world. Vol. I and II: Dis- 
cpmycetes. (All published). London 1875-79. With 113 col¬ 
ored plates. $15. 

Cooke, M C. Grevillea complete. 22 vols. bound in cloth. 

$70. 

Cooke, M. C. Handbook (Fungi), 2 vols. 8 vo. 1871. $12. 

Corda, Anleitung. $4. 

Bonorden’s Handbook of Mycology, 336 pages. With 12 
■col plates. $5. 

Currey, F. On the fructification of certain sphaeriaceous 
Fungi.With 3 plates. (London) 1858. $4. 

Currey F. Synopsis of the fructification of the compound 
and simple Sphaeriae of the Hookerian Herbarium. 3 parts 
With 8 plates. (London) 1858-65. 4. $5. 

Fries, E. Systema Mycologicum. 3 vol. c. indice. Acced. 
supplem.: Elenchus Fungorum. 2 vol. Lundae et Gryphisw. 
1821-32. (M. 34.) 

Fries, E. Observationes Mycologicae. Havnae 1824-28. 
8. 368 pp. et 8 tab. color. Epicrisis Systematis Mycolog. s. 
synopsis Hymenomycetum. Upsaliae. bound 20. 1839-39. 8. 

628 pp. 

Fries, E. Hymenomycetes Europaei s. epicriseos systematis 
Mycologici Ed. 11. Upsal. 1874. 8. 760 pp. $20. 

Stevenson, Mycologia Scotica. 434 pp. $5. 

King’s, Report (Gov. Survey), Botany. Vol. V. $5. 

Wheeler’s, Report (Gov. Survey), Botany. Vol. VI. $5. 

Dr. George Winter, Die Pilze. 

Dr. H. Rehm, Discomycetes. 

Masse, Geo, Gasteromycetes. 

McBride, T. H., Myxomycetes. 

Massee, Geo., Fungi of Cuba, Ceylon, etc. 

Also other books, pamphlets and papers. Send orders and 
apply for information and price when not given, to 

Miss Cora E. Ellis, Newfield, New Jersey. 


Journal of Mr oology 

A Periodical Devoted to North American Mycology. Issued Pi- 
monthly; January , March , May , July , September and November 
Price , $2.00 per Year. To Foreign Subscribers $2.25. Edited and 

Published by ^ ^ KELLERMAN , Ptf. £>., COLUMBUS , Otf/0. 


EDITOR'S NOTES. 

Owing to the absence of the editor from the latter part of 
December until April the notice of Mr. Ellis’s death was not 
printed in the January No. of the Journal as it should have been. 
This second annual Guatemala, trip interfered with prompt issu¬ 
ance of the January and March Nos. as well. Apology is due to 
contributors for delay in the appearance of their papers. 

Occasion may here be taken to note both the rapid expansion 
of Mycology in this country, and the growth of Mycological lit¬ 
erature since Mr. Ellis began his work. We desire to give ample 
credit to the pioneers in systematic Mycology — and no one would 
fail in this connection to recall the work of the trio now passed, 
Schweinitz, Ravenel and Ellis. Their work served largely as a 
guide and incentive to many who have since taken up the work. 
The general advance in all branches of science in the last half 
century is also a significant fact. 


Yet one other factor may be cited as most potent of all, 
namely, the establishment of the Agricultural Experiment Sta¬ 
tions. Mycology, especially the economic phases, has its peculiar 
home in these institutions. If space permitted reference would 
be made to some of the educational institutions, which early took 
up scientific work on fungi; Harvard of course would be first 
and foremost in this list. The U. S. Department of Agriculture 
has been a leader — but the subject is too wide for a brief edi¬ 
torial. 


The Journal of Mycology when inaugurated and when Mr. 
Ellis was the contributing editor, was modest in its pretensions — 
yet most generously supported by the small band of mycologists 
in this country. Though it succumbed for a time, its revival was 
a necessity — in spite of the fact that Experiment Station Bulle¬ 
tins and two important botanical journals were furnishing an 
avenue for publication of the rapidly increasing mycological stu¬ 
dies of ardent students. Mr. Ellis did not wish to resume his 
original place on the title page, yet he was as much interested 
as in the beginning and made frequent contributions. 


Journal of Mycology, Vol. 12, pp. 41-88, Issued May 31, 1906. 








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Volume 12 , No. 83 May 1906 


Journal of Mycology 


TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Shear —Peridermium cerebrum Peck and Cronartium Quercuum 


(Berk). 89 

Morgan — North American Species of Heliomyces. 92 

Ricker — Second Supplement to New Genera— (Concluded). 95 

Kellerman — Index to North American Mycology. 112 

Kellerman- Notes from Mycological Literature, XIX.128 

Editor's Notes. 136 


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Journal of Mycology 


VOLUME 12-MAY 1906 


TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Shear—P eridermium cerebrum Peck and Cronartium Quercuum 


(Berk). ... 89 

Morgan — North American Species of Heliomyces. 92 

Ricker — Second Supplement to New Genera — ( Concluded). 95 

Kellerman — Index to North American Mycology. 112 

Kellerman — Notes from Mycological Literature, XIX. 128 

Editor’s Notes. . 136 


PERiDERMIUM CEREBRUM PECK AND CRONARTIUM 

QUERCUUM (BERK.)* 

C. L. SHEAR. 

The recent work of Klebahn, * 1 Ed. Fischer, 3 and Shirai 2 on 
certain species of Peridermium and their relation to Cronartium 
naturally suggests the probable connection of our American spe¬ 
cies. The common occurrence of P. cerebrum on trunks and 
branches of Pinus Virginiana about Washington and also the 
abundance of Cronartium Quercuum (Berk.) on oaks in the same 
vicinity led to the suspicion that a connection existed between 
these two forms. 

With a view of obtaining some more definite light on the 
subject, some outdoor inoculations were made in the spring of 
1902 by applying the aecidiospores of Peridermium cerebrum to 
the leaves of Quercus Prinus, Q. alba and Q. coccinca. The inocu¬ 
lations were made just about sundown on the evening of May 1, 
twelve marked leaves being used in each case. No infection took 
place in the case of Q. Prinus and Q. alba, which are usually 
entirely free from the fungus in this vicinity. 

On May 12 uredo sori were found on the under surface of 
the infected leaves of Q. coccinea, as follows: 


♦Read before the American Mycological Society. New Orleans, Jam. 
1, 1906. 

1 Deutsch Bot. Gesell. 8, 1890, 61, and later papers. 

2 Beitrage Krypt. Schweiz. 1, 1898, 90, and elsewhere. 

3 Bot. Mag. 13, 1899, 74. 













90 


Journal of Mycology 


[Vol. 12 


No. 1. 20 

No. 2. 17 

No. 3. 72 

No. 4. 62 

No. 5. 3 

No. 6. 3 

No. 7. 2 

No. 8. 11 

No. 9. 116 

No. 10. 20 

No. 11. 28 

No. 12. 0 


On May 18 the cylindrical brown masses of teleutospores 
were found arising from many of the uredo sori. The surround¬ 
ing uninoculated leaves on the same tree showed at this time an 
occasional uredo sorus, varying from one to three on a few of the 
leaves, but no signs of teleutospores were yet to be found. This 
seemed to indicate that infection Had taken place later in the 
case of the natural inoculations than in the case of the artificial 
ones. 

This experiment, conducted in the open woods where there 
was possibility or perhaps probability of infection from other 
sources is, of course, not conclusive. The large number of sori 
occurring on most of the artificially inoculated leaves as com¬ 
pared with the very small number found on the surrounding 
ones, taken in connection with their much earlier appearance, 
seems however to indicate a genetic relation between these forms. 

Other attempts to produce artificial infection undertaken dur¬ 
ing the middle of the day failed, but later experiments made in 
the evening were apparently successful, as numerous sori of the 
Cronartium developed on the inoculated leaves and few or none 
on those uninoculated. Unfortunately, we have not thus far had 
opportunity to carry out artificial inoculation experiments under 
conditions which would preclude the possibility of infection from 
•any other source. 

As bearing upon the probability of the genetic relation of 
these two forms, additional evidence is furnished by the follow¬ 
ing observations: On May 17, 1903, a small tree of Finns Vir- 
giniana, about five feet high, was found having a large spore¬ 
bearing excrescence of Peridermiinn cerebrum on its trunk about 
one foot from the ground. About two feet away two seedling 
oaks were growing, one Quercus Marylcmdica and the other Q. 
Prinus, bearing about a dozen leaves each. Most of the leaves on 
both of these plants had their under surfaces almost literally cov¬ 
ered with the uredo sori of Cronartium Quercuum, and many 
showed teleutospores forming. We have been unable to find any 
record of the fungus occurring on Q. Prinus and have never found 
it ourselves except in this instance, in spite of diligent search in 
various localities where the Peridermium is found, but not in such 














May 1906] Peridermium Cerebrum Peck , Etc. 


91 


close proximity to the oak, and we have never seen it on any host 
in such great abundance as it was on these two plants. The sori 
were not quite so numerous and well developed on the Q. Prinus 
as on Q. Marylandica, which is a normal and common host of the 
fungus. 

Shirai 4 has, according to Klebahn 5 , proven by successful in¬ 
oculation of seedling oaks ( Quercus serrata, Q. variabilis and Q. 
glandulifera) the connection between Cronartium gigantium 
(Mayr) Tubeuf and what he calls Cronartium Quercuum 
(Cooke) Miyabe. Whether this Cronartium, which occurs on the 
oaks in Japan, is identical with the plant occurring on our oaks we 
are unable to say, not having had an opportunity to examine 
Japanese specimens. The authority given by Tubeuf for Cro¬ 
nartium Quercuum is also (Cooke) Miyabe. 

The American plant was first described, so far as we can 
learn, by Berkeley 6 in 1874 as Cronartium Asclepiadeum Quer¬ 
cuum, collected on Quercus nigra in South Carolina and on Q. 
velutina in Pennsylvania. We find no description of the plant by 
Cooke. 

In regard to Peridermium gigantium (Mayr) Tubeuf, this 
w r as first described or mentioned at least by H. Mayr as 
Aecidium gigantium and transferred to Peridermium by Tubuef 7 . 
It is reported as occurring on Pinus desiora, P. Thunbergi, 
P. parvidora and P. Linckuensis in Japan. We had an oppor¬ 
tunity during the past summer, through the kindness of Prof. 
Tubeuf, to examine the Japanese specimens of this fungus upon 
which his figures of the plant are based and which are preserved 
in the collection of the Forestry Institute at Munich. The speci¬ 
mens are identical in appearance with those collected on Pinus 
Virginiana in the vicinity of Washington. Moreover, the sweet 
sap containing spermatia, which is said to exude from the surface 
of the swellings produced by the fungus in Japan, is equally char¬ 
acteristic of our plant. We are, therefore, of the opinion that 
Peridermium gigantium (Mayr) Tubeuf is the same as P. cere¬ 
brum Peck, which was described many years before the Japanese 
plant. Though the matter can not be regarded as settled, all the 
evidence at hand at present points to the idenity of these plants 
and their genetic connection with the uredo and teleutospore 
stages which occur on various species of oak and which are 
known as Cronartium Quercuum. 

It may be interesting to add a list of species of pine and oak 
upon which the two forms have been found in this country. 

4 1. c. 

5 Die Wirtswechselnden Rostpilse, 1904, p. 381. 

8 Grevillea, 1874, 3, 59. 

7 Pflanzenkrankheiten durch Kryptogame Parasiten verursacht, 1895, 
p. 429. 



92 


Journal of Mycology 
¥ 

P eridermium cerebrum. 


[Vol. 12 


The original specimens from New York were on Pinus 
rigida. It has also been collected on this host in New Jersey by 
Ellis (N. A. F. No. 1022) and by the writer. It is reported in 
Farlow and Seymour’s “Host Index” as occurring on P. pondero- 
sa. In Mohr’s “Plant Life of Alabama” it is reported on P. taeda, 

P. echinata and P. Vir giniana. There are specimens of a Peri¬ 
dermium from Mississippi and Texas in the pathological collec¬ 
tion of the Bureau of Plant Industry, Department of Agriculture, 
which also appear to belong to this species. Its distribution, ac¬ 
cording to the records and specimens at hand, is from New York 
to Texas. 

Cronartiu m Q u erciturn. 

This is given by Farlow and Seymour as occurring on the 
following oaks: Quercus coccinea, Q. nigra, Q. tinctoria - Q. 
ajelutina, and Q. virens-Q. vir giniana. There are specimens in 
the pathological collections of the Department of Agriculture on 

Q. velutina, Q. Vir giniana, Q. coccinea and Q. macrocarpa (Fun. 
Col. No. 198). We have found it about Washington on Quercus 
velutina, Q. coccinea, Q. Marylandica, Q. Phellos and Q. Prinus. 
We have collected it in New Jersey on all the species last men¬ 
tioned, except Q. Prinus, and also on the following additional 
species not before reported: Q. alba, Q. digitata, Q. nana and Q. 
minor . Its distribution, so far as indicated by the specimens seen, 
is from Pennsylvania and New Jersey to Mississippi and Texas. 
There are also specimens from Minnesota. Of course, if the con¬ 
nection between these two forms is correct, their distribution 
should be practically identical. 


NORTH AMERICAN SPECIES OF HELIOMYCES. 

A. P. MORGAN. 

HELIOMYCES Le'ville Champ, exot. Am. Sc. Nat. 1844. 

Pileus coriaceous - or membranaceous - tremellose, plicate- 
sulcate or rugulose. Stipe central, tough, cylindric, hstulose, 
Lamellae similar in substance to the pileus, the edge acute; spores 
white. 

Small Agarics which are tremelloid when fresh and growing, 
and when dry have the appearance of Marasmii. Only about a 
dozen species have been described and these are very imperfectly 
known; the spores are recorded in but one or two species. The 
genus is certainly a very interesting one and worthy of the atten¬ 
tion of students; but the species must be observed and described 
in their fresh and growing state, since they change their appear- 





May 190(5] North American Species of Heliomyces 


93 


ance remarkably in drying. No doubt some tropical species of 
Mycena and Marasmius described from the dried specimens be¬ 
long properly in Heliomyces. 

A. STIPE GLABROUS. 

a. Pileus colored from the first. 

1. HELIOMYCES BERTOROI Le'ville Champ, exot. 
i8 44 - ... 

Pileus discoid; umbilicate, naked, radiate-sulcate, ferruginous. 
Stipe slender, somewhat woody, naked, cylindric, ferruginous- 
purpurascent. 

Crowing upon the bark of trees in Porto Rico. The plant is 
4 cm. in height. 

2. HELIOMYCES FOETENS Patouillard, Journ. 
Bot. 1889. 

Ill-smelling; fascicular. Pileus thin, membranaceous, gla¬ 
brous, rufous, the center umbonate, the margin pellucid and torn. 
Stipe slender, rigid, glabrous, the apex thickened, slightly striate. 
Lamellae numerous, very thin, equal, adnexed; spores ovoid, hya¬ 
line, 6x4 mic. 

Growing on rotten wood of Prunus occidentalis upon the 
island of Martinique. Pileus 1.5-3 cm - i n diameter, the stipe 6-8 
cm. long and 1-2 mm. thick. 

b. Pileus at first white. 

3. HELIOMYCES PLUMIERII Le'ville Champ, exot. 
1844. “Fungus crenatus tenuissimus niveus.” Plumier, Traite 
des Fougeres, 1705. 

Pileus expanded, thin, striate, white, the margin crenate- 
dentate. Stipe cylindric, bulbillose at the base. Lamellae thin, 
serrulate. 

Growing in the West Indies. Pileus 4-5 cm. in diameter, the 
stipe 9-10 cm. long and 4-5 mm. thick. A doubtful species. 

4. HELIOMYCES DECOLORANS B. & C. Ann. & 
Mag. N. H. 1859. 

Pileus glabrous, rugose, sulcate, white. Stipe rigid, shining 
white. Lamellae broad, decurrent, white, the interstices wrinkled. 

Growing on dead wood, Alabama. Pileus 2-3 cm. in diam¬ 
eter, the stipe 5 cm. in height. The whole plant is at first white, 
in drying it changes color to rufous or tanny-brown. 

B. STIPE PRUINOSE. 

5. HELIOMYCES NIGRIPES Morgan. Agaricus ni- 
gripes Schweinitz, Syn. Car. 1822. Marasmius nigripes Fries, 
Epicrisis, 1838. 

Tremelloid. Pileus very thin, pure white, pruinose, rugulose- 


94 


Journal of Mycology 


[Vol. 12 


sulcate, convex then expanded. Stipe thickest at the apex, taper¬ 
ing downward, black, white-pruinose, the base insititious. Lamel¬ 
lae pure white, unequal, some of them forked, adnate, the inter¬ 
stices venulose; spores hyaline, stellate, 3-5-rayed, the expanse 
of the rays 8-9 mic. 

Growing on old leaves, sticks, etc. Pileus 1-2 cm. in diam- 
ter, the stipe 2-3.5 crn * l° n g and 1-2 mm. thick. In the dry state, 
the lamellae are changed to flesh-color or rufous and red-brown, 
the stipe loses its black color and pileus and stipe become uni¬ 
formly alutaceous. The pruinosity on the stipe and pileus consists 
of imperfect fiocci and minute glittering cells. 

6. PIELIOMYCES VIALIS Morgan. Marasmius vialis 
Peck. 51 N. Y. Rep. 1897. 

Pileus membranaceous, convex, pruinous, white. Stipe short, 
tough, solid, at first white, then brown or blackish, but covered 
with a white pruinosity, commonly swollen at the base into a 
small downy bulb. Lamellae arcuate, distant, decurrent, white. 

Growing on damp ground by the roadside. Pileus 4-10 mm. 
in diameter, the stipe 1-2 cm. long and about 1 mm. thick. This 
fungus has almost the same style of coloration as Marasmius 
nigripes. 


Index to the Species of Marasmius and Heliomyces. 


acerinus, 11:203 
aciculiformis,ll :245 
aculeatus. 12 :6 
albiceps, 12:5 
albo-fuscus, 12 :5 
albo-marginatus, 11:244 
alliaceus, 11:239 
androsaceus, 11:245 
anomalus. 11:208 
arachnoideus, 12:8 
archyropus, 11: 208 
asperifolius, 12 :8 
atro-rubens, 12 :2 
atro-viridis, 11:233 
badiceps, 11:234 
badius, 11:209 
bambusinus, 11:245 
bellipes, 11:207 
bermudensis, 11:237 
bertoroi (Hel.) 12:93 
biformis, 11:204 
bombycirhiza, 11:207 
brevipes, 11:240 
caespitosus, 12 :7 
calosporus, 12 :8 
calopus, 11:235 
campanulatus, 11:242 
candidus, 11:212 
capillaris, 11:247 
catervatus, 11:211 


chrysochaetes, 12 :1 
clavaeformis, 12 :6 
cohaerens, 11:238 
coilobasis, 11:210 
concinnus, 11:212 
concolor, 12 :7 
copelandi, 11:202 
coracicolor, 11:233 
coracipes, 12 :7 
corrugatus, 11:210 
cubensis, 11:237 
cucullatus, 11:210 
cucurbitula, 11:238 
curreyi, 12:1 
curtisii, 12 :7 
cyathiformis, 12:4 
dealbatus, 11:237 
decolorans (Hel.) 12: 
decurrens, 12 :6 
delectans, 11:206 
dichrous, 11:211 
epiphyllus, 12 :3 
erythropus, 11:207 
fagineus, 11:204 
felix, 12 :2 
ferrugineus, 11 :241 
fibrosipes, 11:205 
filipes, 11:247 
floriceps, 11:234 
foetens (Hel.) 12:93 


fulviceps, 11:243 
fusco-purpureus, 11:206 
glabellus, 11:242 
glancopus, 11:235 
glebigenus, 11:242 
graminum, 12:1 
gregarius, 11:236 
haematocephalus, 11:241 
hawaiensis, 12 :8 
helvolus, 11:245 
hinnuleus, 11:243 
hirtipes, 11:240 
hyperellus, 12 :4 
hypophaeus, 11:243 
inaequallis, 11:244 
insititious, 12 :2 
juglandis, 11:236 
lachnophyllus, 11:239 
lanatus, 11:204 
languidus, 12:4 
leptopus, 11:234 
leucocephalus, 12:5 
longipes, 11:240 
macrorrhiza, 11:239 
melanopus, 11:245 
merulinus, 12 
minutissimus, 12:3 
minutus, 11:246 
multiceps’, 11:240 
nidulus, 12 :8 


May 1906] 


95 


Second Supplement to New Genera 


nigripes (Hel.) 12:93 
nuptialis, 11:238 
obliquus, 12 :7 
olneyi, 11:235 
opacus, 11:237 
oreades, 11:205 
papillatus, 11:240 
papillosus, 11:209 
peronatus, 11:204 
perforans, 12 :3 
personatus, 11:209 
petiolorum, 11:237 
phaeus, 11:243 
pirinus, 11:246 
plancus, 11:205 
plicatulus, 11:207 
plumierii (Hell) 12:93 
poecilus, 11:244 
polyphyllus, 11:208 
praeacutus, 11:212 
prasiosmus, 11:206 
proletarius, 11:246 
pruinatus, 11:242 
pulchripes, 11:242 
purpurascens, 12 :4 
purpureus, 12 :6 


Index — Concluded. 

pusio, 11:235 
putredinis, 11:234 
pyrrhocephalus, 11:239 
ramealis, 11:211 
ramulinus, 11:236 
rhodocephalus, 11:245 
rhyssophyllus, 11:210 
rigidus, 11:203 
rotalis, 11:247 
rotula, 11:247 
rugulosus, 11:211 
sabali, 12 :8 
saccharinus, 12 :2 
salignus, 11:236 
sanguineus* 11:243 
sarmentosus, 11:241 
scabellus, 11:202 
scorodonius, 11:234 
semihirtipes, 11:206 
semisparsus, 12 :5 
semisquarrosus, 11:206 
semiustis, 12 :7 
sericipes, 11:211 
siccus, 11:241 
similis, 11:246 
spinulifer, 11:238 


spongiosus, 11:203 
subcoracinus, 11:235 
subglobosus, 11:210 
subpilosus, 11:209 
subtomentosus, 11:208 
subnidus, 11:202 
subvenosus, 11:246 
sullivantii, 11:208 
sulphureus, 11:204 
straminipes, 111247 
striatipes, 11:205 
stylobates, 11:210 
tenebrarum, 11:234 
tener, 11:243 
tenerrimus, 11:236 
thuj inus, 12 :2 
tomentellus, 11:241 
tomentosipes, 12 :5 
tortipes, 11:244 
umbonatus, 11:203 
urens, 11:202 
vaillantii, 12 :3 
velutipes, 11:209 
vialis (Hel.) 12:94 
viridi-fuscus, 12 :4 
viticola, 11:203 


SECOND SUPPLEMENT TO NEW GENERA OF FUNGI 
PUBLISHED SINCE 1900 WITH CITATION 
AND ORIGINAL DESCRIPTION. 

COMPILED BY P. L. RICKER. 

(Concluded from Page 75.) 

V. Laboulbeniineae. 

[Laboulbeniinae.] 

Distichomy«es Thaxter n. g. Laboulbeniaceae. Proceed¬ 
ings of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, 411308. 

I 9 ° 5 - 

“Receptacle consisting of a basal and subbasal cell sur¬ 
mounted by two parallel series of cells of indefinite number, any 
of which may bear either a sterile appendage or an antheridium 
externally, one of the series ending in a perithecium, the other 
terminated by the primary appendage. Appendages of the same 
type as those of Rickia and Peyritschiella. Antheridia at ma¬ 
turity terminial on a unicellular branch, becoming quite free in 
a complete group.” 

VI. Aecidiomycetae. 

[ Aecidiomycetae. ] 

Baeodromus Arthur n. g. Uredinaceae. Annales Mycolo- 
gici, 3:19. 1905. 



96 


Journal of Mycology 


[Vol. 12 


“Spermagonia globose, subepidermal. Telutospores catenu- 
late, united laterally into compact definite sori; promycelium single 
from near apex of cell, external, recurved, bearing four globose 
sporidia.” 

[ Aecidiomycetae. ] 

Calliospora Arthur n. g. Uredinales. Botanical Gazette, 
39:390. 1905. 

“Telutosori arising from beneath the epidermis, soon naked; 
telutospores 2-celled by transverse partition, wall colored, with 
an external layer which swells in water, germ pores 2 in each 
cell, lateral. Aecidium and uredo wanting. Spermogonia aris¬ 
ing from beneath the cuticle, conical.” 

[Aecidiomycetae. ] 

Ppiragmidiella P. Henn. n. g. Uredinales. Engler’s Bota- 
nische Jahrbucher, 38:104. 1905. 

“Uredosori haud paraphysati, uredosporae castaneo-obscurae, 
asperatae. Telutosporae 3-4 septatae constrictae, pallidulae.” 

[ Aecidiomycetae. ] 

Uromycladium McAlpine n. g. Uredineae. Annales Myco- 
logici, 3:321. 1905; 

“O. Spermogonia somewhat hemispherical, produced under 
the cuticle, without paraphyses at mouth, preceding the forma¬ 
tion of any other spore. 

I. Aecidia at present unknown. 

II. Uredospores borne singly and generally much larger 
than telutospores, with several distinct germ-pores and without 
paraphyses. 

III. Telutospores in clusters, composed of one spore and 
cyst, or two or three spores with or without a cyst, depressed 
globose. Germination as in Uromyces and without a period of 
• rest, as fas as known.” 


VII. Basidiomycetae. 

[ Basidiomycetae ] 

Amauroderma Murrill n. g. Polyporaceae. Bulletin of the 
Torrey Botanical Club, 32:360. 1905. 

“Hymenophore large, epixylous, stipitate, the stipe often 
much elongated; surface smooth, encrusted, not varnished; con¬ 
text brown, punky; tubes cylindrical, concolorous, the mouths 
usually light-colored at first; spores ovoid or globose, brown.” 

[ Basidiomycetae. ] 

Aurantiporellus Murrill n. g. Polyporaceae. Bulletin of 
the Torrey Botanical Club, 32 :486. 1905. 

“Hymenophore large, annual, epixylous, effused, immargi- 
nate or narrowly reflexed; surface azonate, soft anoderm and 
orange-colored when young, becoming slightly encrusted and 
darker with age; context orange-colored, extremely soft and 


May 1906] Second Supplement to New Genera 


97 


spongy throughout; tubes orange-colored, very large, thin-walled, 
irregular, lacerate, fragile; spores smooth, hyaline.” 

[ Basidiomycetae. ] 

Aurantiporus Murrill n. g. Polyporaceae. Bulletin of the 
Torrey Botanical Club, 32 1487. 195. 

“Hymenophore large, annual, epixylous, sessile, dimidiate; 
surface anoderm, sodden, bibulous, reddish-orange, soon fading; 
context reddish-yellow, fleshy-tough to woody, juicy when fresh, 
rigid when dry, conspicuously zonate; tubes small, slender, thin- 
walled, brilliant orange when fresh, becoming dark, resinous and 
fragile on drying; spores smooth, hyaline.” 

[ Basidiomycetae. ] 

Cerrenella Murrill n. g. Polyporaceae. Bulletin of the 
Torrey Botanical Club, 32:361. 1905. 

“Hymenophore thin, effused-reflexed, annual, epixylous; 
surface brown, zonate, anoderm, margin thin; context thin, cori¬ 
aceous, brown; hymenium at first poroid, very soon becoming 
irpiciform, the teeth irregular and compressed; spores smooth, 
hyaline.” 

[ Basidiomycetae. ] 

Coriolellu s Murrill n. g. Polyporaceae. Bulletin of the 
Torrey Botanical Club, 32:481. 1905. 

“Hymenophore small, dry, annual, epixylous, semi- resupi- 
nate; surface white, anoderm, usually azonate; context white, 
thin, fibrous to corky; hymenium concolorous, tubes thin-walled, 
usually large and irregular, dentate, but not irpiciform; spores 
smooth, hyaline.” 

[Basidiomycetae.] 

Coriolopsis Murrill n. g. Polyporaceae. Bulletin of the 
Torrey Botanical Club, 32:358. 1905. 

“Hymenophore thin, flexible or rigid, annual, epixylous, 
sessile, dimidiate, often largely resupinate; surface light-brown, 
zonate, anoderm, hairy, margin thin; context thin, coriaceous to 
woody, pale ferruginous, sometimes almost white; hymenium 
concolorous, tubes small, regular, thin-walled, entire; spores 
smooth, hyaline.” 

[ Basidiomycetae. ] 

Cueamyces Murrill n. g. Polyporaceae. Bulletin of the 
Torrey Botanical Club, 32 :48o. 1905. 

“Hymenophore large, annual epixylous, sessile; thin, dry. 
conchate; surface pelliculose, glabrous, normally azonate; con¬ 
text white or yellowish, thin, homogeneous, very soft and elastic; 
hymenium concolorous, tubes small and regular, rather thick- 
walled, firm and corky, mouths entire, spores smooth, hyaline.” 

[ Basidiomycetae. ] 

Dendrophagus Murrill n. g. Polyporaceae. Bulletin of the 
Torrey Botanical Club, 32:473. 1905. non Tourney 1900. 


98 


Journal of Mycology 


[Vol. 12 


“Hymenophore very large, but of light weight, annual epixy- 
lous, sessile, dimidiate, thick and pulvinate; surface pelliculose, 
glabrous, azonate, margin very obtuse; context very thick, soft 
and spongy throughout; tubes small, dark-colored, thin-walled, 
fragile; spores smooth, hyaline.” 

[See Tornophagus Murr.\ 

[ Basidiomycetae. ] 

Earliella Murrill n. g. Polyporaceae. Bulletin of the 
Torrey Botanical Club, 321478. 1905. 

“Hymenophore medium to large, annual, epixylous, semi- 
resupinate, thin and red but rigid; surface pelliculose, glabrous, 
zonate, more or less reddish-brown in color; context white, coria¬ 
ceous, zonate; hymenium flesh-colored, tubes medium, irregular, 
becoming thin-walled; spores smooth, hyaline.” 

[ Basidiomycetae. ] 

Flaviporellus Murrill n. g. Polyporaceae. Bulletin of the 
Torrey Botanical Club, 32:485. 1905. 

“Hymenophore small, annual, epixylous, sessile or substipi- 
tate, flabelliform, yellow throughout; surface anoderm, margin 
thin; context very thin and friable; tubes small, thin-walled, 
fragile; spores smooth, hyaline or yellowish.” 

[Basidiomycetae.] 

Flaviporus Murrill n. g. Polyporaceae. Bulletin of the 
Torrey Botanical Club, 32:360. 1905. 

“Hymenium annual, often reviving, epixylous, sessile, dimi¬ 
diate, imbricate; surface encrusted, glabrous; context thick, 
woody, brown; tubes thin-walled, minute, regular; spores smooth, 
hyaline.” 

[Basidiomycetae.] 

Fomitella Murrell n. g. Polyporaceae. Bulletin of the 
Torrey Botanical Club, 32:365. 1905. 

“Hymenium sessile, at times semi-resupinate, applanate, 
epixylous; surface glabrous, anoderm to encrusted, sulcate with 
age ; context woody or slightly punky, brownish-olivaceous, rarely 
varying to pallid; tubes minute, cylindrical, usually thick-walled, 
rarely stratose; spores smooth, hyaline.” 

[Basidiomycetae.] 

Gastrosporium Mattirolo 11. g. Lycoperdales. Memorie 
della Reale Accademie Scienze di Torino, II. 53:361. 1903. 

“II Gastrosporium, come indica il nome, e formato da una 
cavita ripiena di innumeravoli minutissime spore, limita da una 
parete doppia.” 

“II corpo fruttifero globoso-lobato e di color bianco latteo, 
di grossezza che varia da quella di un pisello a quella di una noce, 
misurando il pin grosso esemplare esaminato un diametro di circa 
tre cent.” 

“11 Peridio e formato da due strati nettamente differenziati.” 


May 1906 ] Second Supplement to New Genera 


99 


“L’esterno, dello spessore di circa \ mill, puverulento, calceo, 
risulta (negli esemplare essiccati) composto di un materiale fari- 
noso, facilmente esportabile colle dita.” * * * * * 

“L’interno strato, spesso circa ^ di mill., e quindi meno 
sviluppato di quello esterno, nettamente dal primo dififerenziato, 
risulta di ife saldate fra di loro intimamente da una gelatina 
tenace, brillante.” 

“Le Gleba e formata da una massa di sostanza avente colore 
olivaceo chiaro, composta niente altro che da spore piccolissime, 
misuranti vel diametro circa 3 micra, a contorno circolore o leg- 
germente ovale, le quali, solamente a forte ingrandimento, las- 
ciano scorgere ancora il puto di attocco collo sterigma.” 

[Basidiomycetae.] 

Irpiciporus Murrill n. g. Polyporaceae. Bulletin of the 
Torrey Botanical Club, 32:471. 1905. 

“Hymenophore annual, epixylous, sessile, effused-reflexed, 
white or pallid throughout; surface anoderm, glabrous or vel¬ 
vety, not distinctly zonate, margin acute; context thin, leathery, 
pallid or brown; tubes alveolar; spores smooth, hyaline/’ 

[ Basidiomycetae. ] 

Microporellus Murrill n. g. Polyporaceae. Bulletin of the 
Torrey Botanical Club, 32:483. 1905. 

“Hymenophore thin, annual, epixylous, usually flabelliform, 
stipitate, the stipe variously attacked and sometimes much reduced ; 
surface anoderm; multizonate; context thin, white, fibrous, rigid 
and fragile when dry; tubes very minute, regular, thin-walled, 
fragile when dry; spores smooth, hyaline.” 

[ Basidiomycetae. ] 

Nigroporus Murrill n. g. Polyporaceae. Bulletin of the 
Torrey Botanical Club, 32:361. 1905. 

“Hymenium annual, epixylous, dimidiate-sessile to flabelli¬ 
form, glabrous; context dark-brown, firm, homogeneous; tubes 
short, slender, thin-walled, black; spores smooth, hyaline.” 

[Basidiomycetae.] 

Phaeolopsis Murrill n. g. Polyporaceae. Bulletin of the 
Torrey Botanical Club, 32:489. 1905. 

“Hymenophore annual, epixylous, stipitate; surface azonate, 
anoderm, yellow or brown; margin acute; context yellow, fleshy 
to tough and fibrous, not friable; tubes yellow, regular, minute, 
thin-walled; spores smooth, hyaline; stipe excentric or lateral 
with substance and surface like that of the pileus.” 

[ Basidiomycetae. ] 

Porodaedalea Murrill n. g. Polyporaceae. Bulletin of the 
Torrey Botanical Club. 32:367. 1905. 

“Hymenophore large, perennial, epixylous, sessile, conchate 
to ungulate, surface anoderm, sulcate, usually rough; context 


100 


Journal of Mycology 


[Vol. 12 


brown and woody; tubes concolorous, rarely in distinct layers, 
the hymenium varying from porose to daedaleoid; spores smooth, 
hyaline at maturity, becoming brownish with age, cystidia con¬ 
spicuous.” 

[ Basidiomycetae.] 

Pycnoporellus Murrill n. g. Polyporaceae. Bulletin of the 
Torrey Botanical Club, 32:489. 1905. 

‘Hymenophore annual, epixylous, sessile, dimidiate, simple 
or imbricate, reddish or orange-colored throughout; surface ano- 
derm, margin thin; context thin, friable ; tubes thin-walled, fragile, 
at length lacerate; spores smooth, hyaline or pale yellowish.” 

[ Basidiomycetae.] 

Rigidoporus Murrill n. g. Polyporaceae. Bulletin of the 
Torrey Botanical Club, 32 1478. 1905. 

“Hymenophore annual, at times reviving, epixylous, sessile, 
dimidiate, conchate, simple or imbricate; surface pelliculose, mul- 
tizonate, margin thin, incurved when dry; context thin, white, 
woody, very rigid when dry, tubes minute, regular, light brown, 
mouths pruinose when young; spores smooth, hyaline.” 

[ Basidiomycetae. ] 

Tomophagus Murrill n. n. Polyporaceae. (Dendrophagus 
Murr. non Tourney.) Torreya 5:197. 1905. 

VIII. Deuteromycetae. 

[ Deuteromycetae.] 

Asterothyrium P. Hennings n. g. Leptostromataceae. Bo- 
tanische Jahrbucher fur Systematik, Pflanzengeschichte und 
Pflanzengeographie, 34:54. 1904. 

“Perithecia membranacea, dimidiato-scutellata, atra, poro 
pertusa, hyphis circumdata. Conidia oblonge fusoidea, 3 septata, 
hyalina. Cystothyrio, Discosiae affin.” 

[Deuteromycetae.] 

Didymobotryopsis P. Hennings n. g. Stilbaceae. Hedwigia 
4,1 :i49- 1902. 

“Mycelium effusum, albidum; stromata subcylindracea e 
hyphis hyalinis coalitis conflata, apice fimbriata. Conidiophora 
subulata. Conidia acrogena singularia, oblonga, hyalina, i-sep- 
tata. Didymobotryo Sacc. aff.” 

[ Deuteromycetae. ] 

Gliomastix Gueguen n. g. Dematiaceae. Bulletin Trimes- 
triel de la Societe mycologique de France, 21 -.240. 1905. 

‘Hyphae steriles decumbentes; fertiles breves, simplices aut 
subsimplices. Conidia mucilaginea catenata, terminaliter con- 
globata, turbulo brunneo e membrana conidiophori innata, mox 
annulari segmentatione tubuli denudata, inde disjunctores tori- 
formes, inter conidias insertis.” 


May 1906] 


Second Supplement to New Genera 


101 


[ Deuteromycetae. ] 

Madurella Brumpt. n. g. Mucedineae. Comptes Rendus 
Hebdomadaires des seances de la Societe de Biologie 581999. 

I 9 ° 5 - 

Mucedinee a thalle blanc, vivant en parasite dans divers 
tissus animaus (os, muscles, tissu conjoctif), possedant dans sa 
vie vegetative des filaments d'un diametre toufours superieur a 
1 fx et pouvant atteindre 8 a 10 /x. Ces filaments sont cloisonnes 
et se ramifient de temps a autre, ils secretant une substance brune. 
En vieillissant, ces filaments s’organisent en sclerote et leur paroi 
s’ impregne quelquefois de pigment brun. Dans ce sclerote se 
rencontrent en quantite variable des corpuscles arrondis de 8 a 
30 fi de diametre (chlamydospores ?).” 

[ Deuteromycetae. ] 

Monilites Pampaloni n. g. Moniliaceae. Atti della Reale 
Accademie dei Lincei, V. 11:252. 1902. Fossil. 

“Hyphae septatae, hyalinae, vage ramosae, effusae; conidia 
globoso, elliptica, 18-2 i,u, utrinque obtusa, in catenas breves, inter- 
dum ramosas disposita, hyalina, laevia.” 

[Deuteromycetae.] 

Phomopsis Sacc. n. g. Sphaeropsideae. Annales” Mycologici, 
3:166. 1905. 

“Pycnidio subcutanea, plus minus erumpentia, globosa- 
depressa, saepe longitudinaliter oblonga, non raro supra latiuscule 
aperta nec regulariter ostiolata, nigricantia, gregaria. Sporulae 
fusoideo-oblongae, rarius ellipsoideae, typice 2-guttulatae. Basi- 
dia filiformia v. acicularia, saepe demum secedentia et incurvata.” 

[ Deuteromycetae. ] 

Sarcinodochium von Hohnel n. g. Tubercularieae. Oester- 
reichische Botanische Zeitschrift, 55:16. 1905. 

“Epidochien oberflachlich, gelatinos, lebhaft, gefarbt aus 
einem lockenzelligen Grundgewebe bestehend, das nach aussen 
allmahlich in kurze, einfache oder wenig und unregelmassig 
verzweigte Sporentrage ubergeht, die an der Spitze gehauft, 
wenig teils einzellige, teils zwei-bis vier-zellige, kreuzformig 
geteilte, rundliche oder langliche, hyaline Sporen bilden. Sapro- 
phyt.” 

[Deuteromycetae.] 

Tetracoccosporium Szabo n. g. Dematiaceae. Hedwigia, 
44:77. f. a-b. 1905. 

“Cespitulis effusis griseis, hyphis hyalino-sub-fuscis, septatis, 
ramosis, conidiis globosis, ramorum apicem acrogenis, atro-brun- 
neis, duobus parietibus verticalibus angula recto inter se sitis 
partitis.” 

[Deuteromycetae. ] 

Thyrsidina von Honel n. g. Melanconieae. Annales Myco¬ 
logici, 2:337. 1905. 


102 


Journal of Mycology 


[Vol. 12 


“Pilz lebhaft gefarbt, gelatinos-fleischig, hervorbrechend. 
Stroma hell gefarbt, dick, aus plectenchymatisch verflochtenen 
Hyphen bestehend, die an der Spitze noch im Innern des Stroma 
je eine hyalodictiee, rundliche Spore entwickeln, die allmahlich 
heranreifend an die Oberflacne kommt. Sporen schleimig ver- 
bunden.” 

Mycelia Sterilia. 

[Mycelia Sterilia.] 

Mycorrhizonium Weiss, new fossil form-genus of Mycor- 
liiza. Annals of Botany 18:255-265. pi. 18-19. 1904. No spe¬ 

cies described. 

Index to the Genera. 


Acanthostigmella, 62 
Actinomucor, 60 
Actinocephalum, 60 
Amauroderma, 96 
Anixiella, 62 
Aplanobacler, 60 
Asterothyrium, 100 
Aurantiporellus, 96 
Aurantiporus, 97 
Baeodromus, 95 
Calliospora, 96 
Cerrenella, 97 
Chaetomites, 62 
Coriolellus, 97 
Coriolopsis, 97 
Cryptosporina, 63 
Cubamyces, 97 
Dendrophagus, 97 
Dendrostilbella, 63 
Distichomyces, 95 
Dictyonia, 63 
Didymascina, 63 
Didymobotryopsis, 100 
Earliella, 98 
Euanixia, 63 


Englerula, 63 
Feracia, 63 
Flaviporellus, 98 
Flaviporus, 98 
Fomitella, 98 
Gastrosporium, 98 
Geastrina, 64 
Gliomastix, 100 
Henningsomyces, 64 
Hypostomaceae, 64 
Hypoxylina, 64 
Irpiciporus, 99 
Lentomitella, 64 
Madurella, 101 
Melanosporites, 64 
Microporellus, 99 
Microthyrites, 64 
Mitruliopsis, 64 
Monilites, 101 
Mycorrhizonium, 102 
Nematospora, 65 
Nigroporus, 99 
Nigrosphaeria, 65 
Paranectriella, 65 
Perisporites, 65 


Peronosplasmopara, 61 
Phaeolopsis, 99 
Phaeosacardinula, 65 
Phloeophthora, 61 
Phomopsis, 101 
Phragmidiella, 96 
Phragmographum, 65 
Porodaelea, 99 
Pteromyces, 66 
Pycnoporellus, 100 
Pythites, 61 
Rigidoporus, 100 
Robertomyces, 66 
Rolandia, 66 
Saitomyces, 61 
Sarcinodochium, 101 
Seuratiaceae, 66 
Tetracoccosporium, 101 
Thamnocephalis, 62 
Thyrsidina, 101 
Tomophagus, 100 
Uncinulites, 66 
Unguicularia, 66 
Uromycladium, 96 
Zygorhizidium, 62 


INDEX TO NORTH AMERICAN MYCOLOGY. 

Alphabetical List of Articles, Authors, Subjects, Neiv Species 
and Hosts, New Names and Synonyms. 

W. A. KELLERMAN. 

(Continued from Page 79.) 

Eustace, H. J., see Stewart, F. C., Eustace, H. /., and Sirrine, 
F. A. . . . 

Everhart, Benjamin Matlack. Obituary. Jour. Mycol. 10:225. 
Sept. 1904. 



May 1906 ] Index to North American Mycology 


103 


Eysenhardtia amorphoides H. B. K., host to Calliospora hol- 
wayi Arthur n. sp. Bot. Gaz. 39:390. June 1905. 

Eysenhardtia orthocarpa Wats., host to Calliospora holwayi 
Arthur n. sp. Bot. Gaz. 39:390. June 1905. 

Fagus, wood, host to Caryospora cariosa Fairman n. sp. Proc. 
Rochester Acad. Sci. 4:190. 2 Sept. 1905. 

Fairman, Charles E. The Pyrenomyceteae of Orleans County, 
N. Y. Proc. Rochester Acad. Sci. 4:165-191. 2 Sept. 1905. 

Fairman, Charles E. Some New Fungi from Western New 
York. Jour. Mycol. 10:229-231. Sept. 1904. 

Falcata comosa (L.) Kunze, host to Aecidium falcatae Arthur 
n. sp. Bull. Torr. Bot. Club, 33 :32. Jan. 1906. 

Favolus, sec Polyporaceae of North America, X ... . 

Favolus tenuis (Hook.) Murrill n. n. [Boletus reticulatus 
Plook., B. tenuis Hook., Polyporus polygrammus Mont., 
Hexagona tenuis Fr., H. polygramma Fr., H. favoloides 
Peck.] Bull. Torr. Bot. Club, 32:100. Feb. 1905. 

Favolus variegatus (Berk.) Murrill n. n. [Hexagona variegata 
Berk.] Bull. Torr. Bot. Club, 32:101. Feb. 1905. 

Fertilization in Saprolegniales. B. M. Davis. Bot. Gaz. 39:6i- 
4. Jan. 1905. 

Fertilization in the Sabrolegniales. A. H. Trow. Bot. 
Gaz. 39:300. April 1905. 

Festuca jonesii Vasey, see Festuca subulata Trin . 

Festuca pacifica Piper ined., host to Puccinia piperi Ricker n. sp. 
Jour. Mycol. 11 :ii4. May 1905. 

Festuca subulata Trin. (F. jonesii Vasey), host to Puccinia 
kreageri Ricker n. sp. Jour. Mycol. 11:114. May 1905. 

Fimbrystilis holmayana Fernald, host to Puccinia fimbrystilidis 
Arthur n. sp. [Mexico.] Bull. Torr. Bot. Club, 33:28. Jan. 
1906. 

Fimbrystilis polymorpha Breckl., host to Puccinia fimbrystilidis 
Arthur n. sp. [Mexico.] Bull. Torr. Bot. Club, 33:28. Jan. 
1906. 

Fimbrystilis sp., host to Puccinia fimbrystilidis Arthur n. sp. 
[Mexico.] Bull. Torr. Bot. Club, 33:28. Jan. 1906. 

Flammula braendleri Peck n. sp., single or cespitose on decay¬ 
ing trunks. Bull. Torr. Bot. Club, 31 :i8o. Apr. 1904. 

Flammula eccentrica Peck n. sp., on decaying wood. Bull. Torr. 
Bot. Club, 31 H79. Apr. 1904. 




104 Journal of Mycology [Vol. 12 

Flammula multifolia Peck n. sp., decaying wood in ravines. 
Bull. Terr. Bot. Club, 32:79. Feb. 1905. 

Flammula paradoxa Kalch., syn. of Boletinus rhodoxanthus q. v. 

Flammula rhodoxanthus Lloyd Myc. Notes, syn. of Boletinus 
rhodoxanthus q. v. 

Flammula tammi Fr., syn. of Boletinus rhodoxanthus q. v. 

Fly Agaric, Another. [Amanita olitoria Bull.] D. R. Sumstine. 
Jour. Mycol. 11:267. Nov. 1905. 

Fomes auberianus (Mont.) Murrill n. n. [Polyporus auberianus 
Mont.] Bull. Torr. Bot. Club, 32:491. Sept. 1905. 

Fomiteae, snynopsis of, with white or flesh-colored context 
[Murrill]. Bull. Torr. Bot. Club, 32:490. Sept. 1905. 

Frasera macrophyllum Greene, host to Uromyces speciosus Hol- 
way n. sp. Ann. Mycolog. 3 :23* Feb. 1905. 

Fungi, Dairy, see Dairy Fungi, Some Suggestions .... 

Fungi collected in New Mexico. [List of 46 species.] T. D. A. 
Cockerell. Jour. Mycol. 10:49-51. Mar. 1904. 

Fungi, New Species [Peck], see New Species of ... . 

Fungi, Notes on, II, with New Species, see Notes on .... 

Genera Balansia and Dothichloe in the United States with a con¬ 
sideration of their economic importance. Geo. F. Atkinson. 
Jour. Mycol. 11:248-267. PI. 81-88. Nov. 1905. 

Gentiana acuta Mx. [Mexico], host to Uromyces gentianae 
Arth. Ann. Mycolog. 3 :22. Feb. 1905. 

Gentiana heterosepala Englm., host to Uromyces gentianae 
Arth. Ann. Mycolog. 3 :22. Feb. 1905. 

Gentiana quinquefolia occidentalis Hitchcock, host to Uromyces 
gentianae Arth. Ann. Mycolog. 3 :22. Feb. 1905. 

Geopyxis nebulosoides Peck n. sp., decorticated wood. Bull. 
Torr. Bot. Club, 32:80. Feb. 1905. 

Gleditsia, wood of trunk, host to Kalmusia aspera Morgan n. sp. 
Jour. Mycol. 11:153. July 1905. 

Gloeosporium obtegens Syd. n. sp., in frondibus vivis Pteridi 
aquilini var. lanuginosi. Ann. Mycolog. 2:172. Mar. 1904. 

Gomphidius Rhodoxanthus Once More. [Note and synonomy.] 
D. R. Sumstine. Jour. Mycol. 11:165-166. July 1905. 

Gompiius rhodoxanthusSchw., syn. of Boletinus rhodoxanthus 
q. v. 

Gouania tomentosa Jacq., host to Puccinia gouaniae Holway n. 
sp. [Cuba.]. Ann. Mycolog. 3:2i. Feb. 1905. 

Grifolia fractipes (B. & C.) Murrill n. n. [Polyporus fractipes 
B. & C.] Bull. Torr. Bot. Club, 31:33s. June 1904. 


May 190 ( 5 ] Index to North American Mycology 


105 


Gymnosporangium juniperi-virginianae Schw. [Cultures on 
Apple. Arthur.] Jour. Mycol. 12:14. Jan. 1906. 

Hamamelis virginica, host to Sphaeropsis hamamelidia FI. Tassi 
n. sp. Bull. Lab. ed Orto Bot. 6:126. 1904. 

Haplosporella cercidis E. & B., on dead limbs of Cercis cana- 
densia. Jour. Mycol. 11:108. May 1905. 

Haplosporella diatrypoides E. & B., on dead limbs of Ulmus 
pubescens. Jour. Mycol. 11:108. May 1905. 

Haplosporellas, Two New. J. B. Ellis and E. Batholomew. 
Jour. Mycol. 11:108. May 1905. 

Helotium vitellinum Rehm, var. pallido-striatum Fairman n. 
var., on fallen petioles in the woods. Jour. Mycol. 10:231. 
Sept. 1904. 

Helvella stevensii Peck, n. sp., open woods of oak and hickory. 
Bull. Torr. Bot. Club, 31 :i82. Apr. 1904. 

Hexagona favoloides Peck, syn. of Favolus tenuis q. v. 

Hex agon a polygramma Fr., syn. of Favolus tenuis q. v. 
Hexagona sericea Fr., syn. of Coriolus sericeohirsutus q. v. 
Hexagona tenuis Fr., syn. of Favolus tenuis q. v. 

Hexagona variegata Berk., syn. of Favolus variegatus q. v. 

Holway, E. W. D. North American Salvia Rusts. Jour. Mycol. 
11:156-8. July, 1905. 

Holway, E. W. D. North American Uredineae. [Several new 
species, etc.] Ann. Mycolog. 3:20-24. Feb. 1905. 

Holway, E. W. D. Notes on Uredineae, III. [Puccinia atro- 
fusca (Dudley & Thompson) Holway n. n.] Jour. Mycol. 
10 1228. Sept. 1904. 

Holway, E. W. D. Notes on Uredineae, IV. Jour. Mycol. 
11:268. Nov. 1905. 

Host Plants of Panaeolus Epimyces Peck. Helen Sherman. 
Jour. Mycol. 11:167-9. PI. 80. July 1905. 

Hypholoma pecosense Cockerell n. sp. Jour. Mycol. 10:108. 
May 1904. 

Hypocrea alutacea, Life history of. George F. Atkinson. Bot. 
Gaz. 40:401-416. PI. XIV-XVI. Dec. 1905. 

Hypocrea alutacea Tub, syn. of Podostroma alutacea q. v. 

Hypocrea atramentosa B. & C., syn. of Dothichloe atramentosa 
q. v. 

Hypocrella atramentosa Sacc., Mich., syn. of Dothichloe atra¬ 
mentosa q. v. 

Hypocrella hypoxylon Ellis, p. p. N. A. Pyr., syn. of Dothichloe 
atramentosa q. v. 



[Vol. 12 


106 Jour?ial of Mycology 

Hypocrella hypoxylon E. & E., syn. of Dothichloe atramentosa 
q. v. 

Hypocrella hypoxylon Sacc. Syll. & Ellis p. p., syn. of Balansia 
hypoxylon q. v. 

Hypocrea lloydii Bresadola, syn. of Podostroma alutacea q. v. 

Hyalospora pellaeicola Arthur n. sp., on Pellaea andromedae- 
folio (Kaulf.) Fee, and Crytogramme stelleri (Gmel.) 
prantl, (Pellaea gracilis Hook.) Bull. Torr. Bot. Club, 33:30. 
Jan. 1906. 

Index to North American Mycology (continued). W. A. Kel- 
lerman. Jour. Mycol. 116-143. May 1904. 

Index to North American Mycology (continued). W. A. Kel- 
lerman. Jour. Mycol. 10:251-283. Sept. 1904. 

Index to Journal of Mycology, volumes 1-10. Jour. Mycol. 10: 
289-387. Nov. 1904. 

Index to North American Mycology (continued). W. A. Kel- 
lerman. Jour. Mycol. 11:125-148. May 1905. 

Index to North American Mycology (continued). W. A. Kel- 
lerman. Jour. Mycol. 11:190-9. July 1905. 

Index to North American Mycology (continued). W. A. Kel- 
lerman. Jour. Mycol. 11:217-231. Sept. 1905. 

Discard Ionotus amplectens Murrill n. sp., etc., and insert: 

Inonotus amplectens Murrill n. sp.; the fruit-bodies were found 
encircling living twigs of Asimina parviflora ( ?). Bull. Torr. 
Bot. Club, 31:6oo. Nov. 1904. 

Discard Ionotus corrosus Murrill n. sp., etc., and insert: 

Inonotus corrosus Murrill n. sp. Bull. Torr. Bot. Club, 31:598. 
Nov. 1904. 

Discard Ionotus dryophilus {Berk.) Murrill n. n., etc., and insert: 

Inonotus dryophilus (Berk.) Murrill n. n. [Polyporus dryophi¬ 
lus Berk.] Bull. Torr. Bot. Club, 311597. Nov. 1904. 

Inonotus fibrillosus Karst., syn. of Pycnoporellus hbrillosus q. v. 

Discard Ionotus fruticum (B. & C.) Murrill n. n., etc., and insert: 

Inonotus fruticum (B. & C.) Murrill n. n. [Polyporus fruticum 
B. & C.] Bull. Torr. Bot. Club, 31:6oi. Nov. 1904. 

Discard Ionotus hirsutus {Scop.) Karst., etc., and insert: 

Inonotus hirsutus (Scop.) Karst. [Boletus hirsutus Scop., B. 
spongiosus Lightf., B. hispidus Bull., B. flavus Poll., Poly¬ 
porus hispidus Fr., P. endocrinus Berk., Inodermus hispidus 
Quell.] Bull. Torr. Bot. Club, 31 1594. Nov. 1904. 

Discard Ionotus jamaicensis Murrill n. sp., etc., and insert: 

Iononotus jamaicensis Murrill n. sp. Bull. Torr. Bot. Club, 
31 ^97. Nov. 1904. 


May 1906] Index to North America?i Mycology 


107 


Discard Ionotus Karst. [Inoderma Karst.], etc., and insert: 
Inonotus Karst. [Inoderma Karst.] Bull. Torr. Bot. Club, 
3 1 : S 93 - Nov. 1904. 

Discard Inonotus, Key to the North American species, etc., and 
insert: 

Inonotus, Key to the North American species. [Murrill.] Bull. 

Torr. Bot. Club, 311594. Nov. 1904. 

Discard Inonotus perplanus ( Peck ) Murrill n. n., etc., and insert: 

Inonotus perplexus (Peck) Murrill n. n. [Polyporus perplexus 
Peck.] Bull. Torr. Bot. Club, 311596. Nov. 1904. 

Discard Ionotus pusillus Murrill n. sp., etc., and insert: 

Inonotus pusillus Murrill n. sp.; the tiny brown sporosphores 
were found in large numbers emerging from the lenticels of 
small dead branches of Jacquinia. Bull. Torr. Bot. Club, 
31:599. Nov. 1904. 

Discard Ionotus radiatus ( Sowerby ) Karst, etc., and insert: 
Inonotus radiatus (Sowerby) Karst. [Boletus radiatus Sower¬ 
by, Polyporus radiatus Fr., P. glomeratus Peck, Inoderma 
radiatum Karst.] Bull. Torr. Bot. Club, 311599. Nov. 1904. 

Discard Ionotus texanus Murrill n, sp., etc., and insert: 

Inonotus texanus Murrill n sp., on a Mesquite (?) tree. Bull. 
Torr. Bot. Club, 311597. Nov. 1904. 

Discard Ionotus wilsonii Murrill n. sp., etc., and insert: 
Inonotus wilsonii Murrill n. sp., on decaying logs. Bull. Torr. 
Bot. Club, 311598. Nov. 1904. 

Jeczewski, Year Book of Diseases, see Review o\f ... . 

Jones, L. R. and Morse, W. J. Disease Resistance of Potatoes, 
Plant Diseases in Vermont in 1904, Potato Diseases and their 
remedies. [Experiments and general account; not taxo¬ 
nomic.] An. Rep. Vermont Agr. Exp. Sta., 18:264-291. 

I 9 ° 5 - 

Juniperus virginiana, host to Melanomma juniperi Ellis & Ever¬ 
hart n. sp. Proc. Rochester Acad. Sci. 4:190. 2 Sept. 1905. 

Kalmusia, A New Species of. A. P. Morgan. Jour. Mycol. 
11:153. July 1905. 

Kalmusia aspera Morgan n. sp., growing on the hard wood of a 
prostrate trunk of Gleditsia. Jour. Mycol. 11 M53. July 1905. 

Karschia crassa Fairman n. sp., on decaying wood in the woods. 
Jour. Mycol. 10:229. Sept. 1904. 

Kauffman, Calvin Henry. The genus Cortinarius: a prelimi¬ 
nary study. Bull. Torr. Bot. Club, 32:301-325. 7 figs. June 
1905. 

Kellerman, W. A. Elementary Mycology. Jour. Mycol. 10:90- 
5. Mar. 1904. 



Journal of Mycology 


108 


[Vol. 12 


Kellerman, W. A. Elementary Mycology, continued. Jour. 
Mycol. 10:144-9. May 1904. 

Kellerman, W. A. Index to North American Mycology (con¬ 
tinued). Jour. Mycol. 116-143. May 1904. 

Kellerman, W. A. Index to North American Mycology (con¬ 
tinued). Jour. Mycol. 10:251-283. Sept. 1904. 

Kellerman, W. A. Index to North American Mycology (con¬ 
tinued). Jour. Mycol. 11:125-148. May 1905. 

Kellerman, W. A. Index to North American Mycology (con¬ 
tinued). Jour. Mycol. 11:190-9. July 1905. 

Kellerman, W. A. Minor Mycological Notes, III. [Podo~ 
sphaera tridactyla; Abnormal Collybia radicata.] Jour. 
Mycol. 10:62-4. Mar. 1904. 

Kellerman, W. A. Minor Mycological Notes, IV. [Uncinula 
parvula; Mycological Flora of Cedar Point.] Jour. Mycol. 
10:114-6. May 1904. 

Kellerman, W. A. Mycological Bulletin [24 Nos.] Vol. 3. 
1905. 

Kellerman, W. A. A New species of Naemosphaera [N. lac- 
tucicola]. Jour. Mycol. 10:113-4. May 1904. 

Kellerman, W. A. Notes from Mycological Literature, IX. 
Jour. Mycol. 10:81-90. Mar. 1904. 

Kellerman, W. A. Notes from Mycological Literature, X. 
Jour. Mycol. 10:156-8. May 1904. 

Kellerman, W. A. Notes from Mycological Literature, XV. 
Jour. Mycol. 11:149-151. May 1905. 

Kellerman, W. A. Notes from Mycological Literature, XVI. 
Jour. Mycol. 11:180-190. July 1905. 

Kellerman, W. A. Notes from Mycological Literature, XVII. 
Jour. Mycol. 11:271-2. Nov. 1905. 

Kellerman, W. A. Notes from Mycological Literature, XVIII. 
Jour. Mycol. 12:32-9. Jan. 1906. 

Kellerman, W. A. Ohio Fungi Fascicle IX. [Labels.] Jour. 
Mycol. 10:55-62. Mar. 1904. 

Kellerman, W. A. and Ricker, P. L. New Genera of Fungi 
published since the year 1900, with citation and original de¬ 
scriptions (continued), jour. Mycol. 10:232-250. Sept. 
1904. 

Kellerman, W. A. Uredineous culture experiments with Puc- 
cinia sorghi. 1905. Jour. Mycol. 12:9-11. Jan. 1906. 

Key to Agaricaceae [Murrill], see Agaricaceae, snynopsis . . . . 
Key to the brown sessile Polyporaceae, see Polyporaceae . . . . 
Key to the common species of Clitopilus, see Clitopilus , Key . . . . 
Key to the Cortinarii, see Cortinarii , Partial Key .... 


May 1906 ] Index to North American Mycology 


109 


Key to the Fomiteae, see Fomiteae, synopsis .... 

Key to the North American species of Bjerkandera. [Murrill.] 
Bull. Torr. Bot. Club, 32 :63d. Dec. 1905. 

Key to the North American species of Trametes. [Murrill.] 
Bull. Torr. Bot. Club, 32 1637. Dec. 1905. 

Key to the North American species of Coriolus. [Murrill.] Bull. 
Torr. Bot. Club, 32:641. Dec. 1905. 

Laciinea fusicarpa (Ger.) Sacc., syn. of Macropodia fusicarpa 
q. v. 

Lachnea hainesii (Ell.) Sacc., syn. of Macropodia semitosta 
q. v. 

Lachnum atropurpureum Durand n. sp., on Eucalytus. Jour. 
Mycol. 10:100. May 1904. 

Lactuca viro.sa, host to Naemosphaera lactucicola Kellerm. n. 
sp. Jour. Mycol. 10:114. May 1904. 

Lasiospiiaeria hirsuta (Fr).) var. terristris Sacc., syn. of Lasio¬ 
sphaeria uliginosa q. v. 

Lasiosphaeria ovina (Pers.) Fuckel, var. aurelia Fairman n. 
var. Sphaeria ovina Pers.), on the surface of wood (Tilia 
americana, Basswood?). Jour. Mycol. 10:229. Sept. 1904. 

Lasiosphaeria uliginosa (Fries). L. hirsuta (Fr.) var. ter- 
restris Sacc. [Morgan.] Jour. Mycol. 10:227. Sept. 1904. 

Lawrence, W. H. Blackspot Canker and Blackspot Apple Rot. 
Jour. Mycol. 11:164-5. July 1905. 

Leguminous Rusts from Mexico. J. C. Arthur. Bot. Gaz. 39: 
3 8 S- 39 6 - J un e i 9 ° 5 - 

Lehman, E. A. North Carolina Fungi — The Academy [Wins¬ 
ton-Salem, N. C.], vol. XXVII, 1904, p. 4031-4037, Fig. 1-4. 
[From Ann. Mycolog. Feb. 1905, p. 87.] 

Lenzites bicolor Fr., syn. of Agaricus confragosus (Bolt.) Mur¬ 
rill q. v. 

Lenzites cookeii Berk., syn. of Agaricus confragosus (Bolt.) 
Murrill q. v. 

Lenzites crataegi Berk., syn. of Agaricus confragosus (Bolt.) 
Murrill q. v. 

Lenzites deplanata Fr., syn. of Agaricus deplanatus q. v. 
Lenzites glaberrima B. & C., syn. of Agaricus aesculi q. v. 

Lenzites klotzschii Berk., syn. of Agaricus confragosus (Bolt.) 
Murrill q. v. 

Lenzites proxima Berk., syn. of Agaricus confragosus (Bolt.) 
Murrill q. v. 

Lenzites see Polyporaceae of North America, X ... . 

Lenzites unguliformis B. & C., syn. of Agaricus confragosus 
(Bolt.) Murrill q. v. 




Jourrial of Mycology 


110 


[Vol. 12 


Lepiota brunnescens Peck n. sp., open wood and grassy places. 

Bull. Torr. Bot. Club, 31:177. Apr. 1904. 

Lepiota glatfelteri Peck n. sp., ground in woods. Bull. Torr. Bot. 
Club, 31 :177. Apr. 1904. 

Leptoporus pubescens Pat., syn. of Coriolus pubescens q . v. 

Life history of Hypocrea alutacea. George F. Atkinson. Bot. 
Gaz. 40:401-416. PI. XIV-XVI. Dec. 1905. 

Lisianthus exsertus, host to Phyllosticta lisianthi Sny. n. sp. 
Ann. Mycolog. 2:171. Mar. 1904. 

Lloyd, C. G. The Lycoperdaceae of Australia, New Zealand, 
and neighboring islands. Illustrated with 15 plates and 49 
figures [42 pp.j. Issued at the Lloyd Library, Cincinnati, 
April 1905. 

Loeselia ciliata, host to Puccinia fumosa Holway n. sp. Ann. 
Mycolog. 3 :23. Feb. 1905. 

Loeselia coccinea Don., host to Puccinia fumosa Flolway n. sp. 

Ann. Mycolog. 3 :23. Feb. 1905. 

Loeselia glandulosa, host to Puccinia fumosa Holway n. sp. Ann. 
Mycolog. 3:23. Feb. 1905. 

Lophiostoma cephalanthis Fairman n. sp., on decortiated area of 
branch of Cephalanthus occidentalis. Jour. Mycol. 10:230. 
Sept. 1904. 

Lophiostoma imperfecta Ellis & Fairman n. sp., on dead stems 
of Asclepias? Proc. Rochester Acad. Sci. 4:187. 2 Sept. 

1905. 

Lupinus mexicana H. B. K., host to Uromyces montanus Arthur 
n. sp. Bot. Gaz. 39:386. June 1905. 

Lupinus sparsiflorus, host to Placosphaeria lupini Sny. n. sp. 
Ann. Mycolog. 2:172. Mar. 1904. 

Lupinus sp., host to Uromyces rugosa Arthur n. sp. Got. Gaz. 
39:386. June 1905. 

Lycoperdaceae, The, of Australia, New Zealand, and neighbor¬ 
ing islands. Illustrated with 15 plates and 49 figures [42 pp.]. 
C. G. Lloyd. Issued at the Lloyd Library, Cincinnati, April 
1905. 

Lysiloma tergimina Benth., host to Ravenelia lysilomae Arthur 
11. sp. Bot. Gaz. 39:392. June 1905. 

Macropodia fusicarpa (Ger.) Durand. [Peziza fusicarpa Ger., 
Peziza (Sarcoscyphae) pubida B. & C., Macropedia pubida 
(B. & C.) Sacc., Lachnea fusicarpa (Ger.) Sacc., Peziza ve- 
lutina B. & C. (ined.) in Curtis Bot. N. Car., Peziza morgani 
Mass. Durand.] Jour. Mycol. 12:29. Jan. 1906. 

Macropodia pubida (B. & C.) Sacc., syn. of Maero podia fnsi- 
ccirpa q. v. 


May 1906] Index to North America?i Mycology 


111 


Maropodia semitosta (B. & C.) Sacc. [Peziza (Sarcoscypha) 
semitosta B. & C., Peziza hainesii Ell., Lachnea hainesii (Ell.) 
Sace. Durand.] Jour. Mycol. 12:31. Jan. 1906. 

Maple, bark, host to Anthostoma acerinum Ellis & Fairman n. 

sp. Proc. Rochester Acad. Sci. 4:189. 2 Sept. 1905. 
Marasmius bellipes Morgan n. sp., growing on old leaves of 
deciduous trees. Jour. Mycol. 11:207. Sept. 1905. 
Marasmius copelandi Peck n. sp., on dead leaves of Quercus 
densiflora. Bull. Torr. Bot. Club, 31 :i82. Apr. 1904. 
Marasmius delectans Morgan n. sp., growing on the ground 
among fallen twigs and leaves. Jour. Mycol. 11:206. Sept. 

1905. 

Marasmius felix Morgan n. sp., growing on leaves of Platanus 
insitious on the petioles and veins. Jour. Mycol. 12:2. Jan. 

1906. 

Marasmius, North American species of. [Monograph.] A. P. 
Morgan. Jour. Mycol. 11 :201-212, 234-247. Sept, and Nov. 
1905. 12:1-9. Jan. 1906. 

Marasmius nuptialis Morgan n. sp., growing on rotton wood 
among old leaves. Jour. Mycol. 11:238. Nov. 1905. 

Melanomma juniperi Ellis & Everhart n. sp., on loosely hanging 
bark of Juniperus virginiana. Proc. Rochester Acad. Sci. 
4:190. 2 Sept. 1905. 

Melam psora medusae Thuem. [Cultures on Larix laricina, and 
L. decidua. Arthur.] Jour. Mycol. 12:13. J an - I 9°6. 
Melasmia thouiniae Syd. n. sp., in foliis vivis Thouinia acumina- 
er. [Mexico.] Ann. Mycolog. 2:171. Mar. 1904. 

Melica smithii (Porter Vasey, host to Puccinia paradoxica Rick¬ 
er n. sp. Jour. Mycol. 11:114. May 1905. 

Melogramma patens Morgan n. sp., growing on dead branches 
of Carpinus americans. Jour. Mycol. 10:59. Mar. 1904. 

Menodora scoparia, host to Coniothecium erumpens Sacc. et 
Syd. n. sp. Ann. Mycolog. 2:173. Mar. 1904. 

Merisma Gill, non Pers., syn. of Bjerkandera q. v. 
Mesosphaerum pectinatum (L.) Kunze, host to Puccinia dis- 
torta Holway n. sp. Ann. Mycolog. 3 '.22. Feb. 1905. 

Mesosphaerum sp., host to Puccinia distorta Elolway n. sp. Ann. 
JMycolog. 3:22. Feb. 1905. 

Mesquite, bark, host to Didymosphaeria cryptosphaetioides 
Rehm n. sp. Ann. Mycolog. 2:176. Mar. 1904. 

Microcera brachyspora Sacc. & Scalia n. sp., on the bark of some 
tree, associated with Nectria sanguinea. Alaska Har. Ex- 
ped. 5:15. 5 April 1904. 




112 Journal of Mycology [Vol. 12 

Micromeria chamissonis, host to Puccinia micromeriae Dudley 
& Thompson. Jour. Mycol. 10:55. Mar. 1904. 

Milesi, M. e Traverse G. B. Saggio di una monografia del 
genera Traphragmium. Ann. Mycolog. 2:143-156. Mar. 
1904. 

Mimosaceae, an undetermined species of, host to Ravenelia gra¬ 
cilis Arthur n. sp. Bot. Gaz. 39:393. June 1905. 

Minor Mycological Notes, III. [Podosphaera tridactyla; Ab¬ 
normal Collybia radicata.] Jour. Mycol. 10:62-4. Mar. 

1904. 

Minor Mycological Notes, IV. [Uncinula parvula; Mycolog¬ 
ical Flora of Cedar Point, Ohio.] W. A. Kellerman. Jour. 
Mycol. 10:114-6. May 1904. 

Monardella undulata, host to Puccinia monardellae Dudley & 
Thompson n. sp. Jour. Mycol. 10:54. Mar. 1904. 

Monardella villosa, host to Puccinia monardellae Dudley & 
Thompson n. sp. Jour. Mycol. 10:54. Mar. 1904. 

Monascus purpureus, The Morphology of. Edgar W. Olive. 
Bot. Gaz. 39:56-60. Jan. 1905. 

Morchella esculenta (L.) Pers., Remarkable occurrence of. W. 
O. Sturgis. Jour. Mycol. 11:269. Nov. 1905. 

Morgan, A. P. A New Chaetosphaera. Jour. Mycol. 11:105. 
May, 1905. 

Morgan, A. P. A New Melogramma [M. patens]. Jour. Mycol. 
10:49. Mar. 1904. 

Morgan, A. P. A New Species of Kalmusia [K. aspera.] Jour. 
Mycol. 11:153. July 1905. 

Morgan, A. P. North American species of Marasmius. [Mono¬ 
graph.] Jour. Mycol. 11:201-212, 234-247. Sept, and Nov. 

1905. 12:1-9. J an * 1906. 

Morgan, A. P., Peziza pubida B. & C. [Note.] Jour. Mycol. 11: 
154. July 1905. 

Morgan, A. P. Pyrenomycetes scarcely known in North Ameri¬ 
ca. [Notes an a few species.] Jour. Mycol. 10:226. Sept. 
1904. 

Morgan, A. P. Tubercularia fasciculata Tode. [Note.] Jour. 
Mycol. 10:97-8. May 1904. 

Morphology of Monascus purpureus. Edgar W. Olive. Bot. 
Gaz. 39:56-60. Jan. 1905. 

Murrill, William Alphonso. A Key to the brown sessile Poly- 
poraceae of temperate North America. Torreya, 5:194-5. 
Nov. 1905. 


May 1906 ] Index to North American Mycology 113 

Murrill, William Alphonso. The Polyporaceae of North Amer¬ 
ica, X. Agaricus, Lenzites, Cerrena and Favolus. Bull. 
Torr. Bot. Club, 32 :83-i03. Feb. 105. 

Murrill, William Alphonso. The Polyporaceae of North Amer¬ 
ica, XIII. The described species of Bjerkandera, Trametes 
and Coriolus. Bull Torr. Bot. Club, 32 :633-656. Dec. 1905. 
Murrill, William A. Tomophagus for Dendrophagus. Ttir- 
reya, 5:197. Nov. 1905. 

Mycological Bulletin [24 Nos.] Vol. 3, 1905. W. A. Keller- 
man. Columbus, Ohio. 

Mycological Flora of Cedar Point [list of 64 species]. W. A. 
Kellerman. Jour. Mycol. 10:114-6. May 1904. 

Myriadoporus Peck, syn. of Bjerkardera q. v. 

Myrica gale L., host to Cronartium comptoniae Arthur n. sp. 
Bull. Torr. Bot. Club, 33 :29. Jan. 1906. 

Naemosphaera lactucicola Kellerm. n. sp., on old stems of Lac- 
tuca virosa. Jour. Mycol. 10:114. May 1904. 

New Chaetosphaera, A. A. P. Morgan. Jour. Mycol. 11:105. 
May 1905. 

New Egg Plant Fungus. [Ascochyta lycopersici Brun.] Clayton 
O. Smith. Jour. Mycol. 10:98-9. May 1904. 

New Fungi from Western New York. Charles E. Fairman. 
Jour. Mycol. 10:229-231. Sept. 1904. 

New Genera of Fungi published since the year 1900 with cita¬ 
tion and original descriptions, (continued). Compiled by 
W. A. Kellerman and P. L. Ricker. Jour. Mycol. 10:232-250. 
Sept. 1904. 

New Hypholoma, A. [H. pecosense]. T. D. A. Cockerell. Jour.. 
Mycol. 10:108. May 1904. 

New Melogramma [M. patens]. A. P. Morgan. Jour. Mycol. 
10:49. Mar. 1904. 

New Mexico Fungi. [List of 46 species; Cockerell.] Jour. My¬ 
col. 10:49-51. Mar. 1904. 

New Phyllachora from Mexico. J. B. Ellis and W. A. Kellerman. 
Jour. Mycol. 10:231-2. Sept. 1904. 

New Species from Various Localities, Notes on Fungi II. P. L. 
Ricker. Jour. Mycol. 11:111-5. May 1905. 

New Species (three) of Discomycetes. Elias J. Durand. Jour. 
Mycol. 10:99-101. May 1904. 

New, Species of Fungi. Charles FI. Peck. Bull. Torr. Bot. Club,. 
31 :177-182. Apr. 1904. 

New Species of Kalmusia [K. aspera]. A. P. Morgan. Jour. 
Mycol. 11 :i53- July 1905. 


114 


Journal of Mycology 


[Vol. 12 


New Species of Naemosphaera [N. lactucicola]. W. A. Keller- 
man. Jour. Mycol. 10:113-4. May 1904. 

New Species of Synchytriumi [S. scirpi]. J. J. Davis. Jour. 
Mycol. 11:154-6. July 1905. 

New Species of Uredineae, IV. Joseph Charles Arthur. Bull. 

Torr. Bot. Club, 33 :27~34. Jan. 1906. 

New Species of Uredineae [Holway], see North American Ure¬ 
dineae .... 

New Uredineous Fungus [new genus], see Baeodromus Holwayi 
Arth. } a Nezv .... 

Nomenclature and Classifications [Erwin F. Smith], see Bac¬ 
teria Nomenclature and .... 


North American Salvia-Rusts. E. W. D. Holway. Jour. Mycol. 
11 :156-8. July 1905. 

North American species of Marasmius, see Marasmius . . . 

North American Uredineae. [Several new species, etc.] E. W. 
D. Holway. Ann. Mycolog. 3 :20-24. Feb. 1905. 

Notes from Mycological Literature, IX. W. A. Kellerman. 
Jour. Mycol. 10:81-90. Mar. 1904. 

Notes from Mycological Literature, X. Jour. Mycol. 10:156-8. 
May 1904. 

Notes from Mycological Literature, XII. W. A. Kellerman. 
Jour. Mycol. 10:283-287. Sept. 1904. 

Notes from Mycological Literature, XV. W. A. Kellerman. 
Jour. Mycol. 11:149-151. May 1905. 

Notes from Mycological Literature, XVI. W. A. Kellerman. 
Jour. Mycol. 11:180-190. July 1905. 

Notes from Mycological Literature, XVII. W. A. Kellerman. 
Jour. Mycol. 11:271-2. Nov. 1905. 

Notes from Mycological Literature, XVIII. W. A. Kellerman. 
Jour. Mycol. 12:32-9. Jan. 1906. 

Notes on Californian Uredineae and Descriptions of New Spe¬ 
cies. W. R. Dudley and C. H. Thompson. Jour. Mycol. 
10:52-5. Mar. 1904. 

Notes on Fungi II, with New Species from Various Localities. 
P. L. Ricker. Jour. Mycol. 11:111-5. May I 9 ° 5 - 

Notes on Some North American Phyllachoras. Joseph F. Clev¬ 
enger. Jour. Mycol. 159-164. Pr. 79. July 1905. 

Notes on the Erysiphaceae of Washington. W. A. Lawrence. 
Jour. Mycol. 11:106-8. May 1905. 

Notes on Uredineae, IV. E. W. D. Holway. Jour. Mycol. 
11:268. Nov. 1905. 


May 1906] Index to North A7nerican Mycology 


115 


Notes on Uredineae, III. [Puccinia atro-fusca (Dudley & 
Thompson) Holway n. n.] E. W. D. Holway. Jour. Mycol. 
10:228. Sept. 1904. 

Novae Fungorum species. H. et P. Sydow. [Nearly fifty species 
of which about a half dozen are North American.] Ann. 
Mycolog. 2:162-174. Mar. 1904. 

Nummularia fuscella Rehm n. sp., ad lignum decorticatum Cel- 
tidis. Ann. Mycolog. 2:175. Mar. 1904. 

Ohio Fungi, Fascicle IX. [Labels.] Jour. Mycol. 10:55-62. 
Mar. 1904. 

Olive, Edgar W. The Morphology of Monascus purpureus. Bot. 
Gaz. 39:56-60. Jan. 1905. 

POphiodothis vorax var. atramentaria Sacc. Syll., syn of Do- 
thichloe atramentosa q. v. 

Osmunda cinnamomea, host to Uredinopsis osmudae P. Magn. 
n. sp. Hedwigia, 43:123. 24 Mar. 1904. 

Oxalis stricta, host to Sphaerulina oxalidis Rehm n. sp. Ann. 
Mycolog. 2:177. Mar. 1904. 

Panaeolus Epimyces Peck, Host Plants of. Helen Sherman. 
Jour. Mycol. 11:167-9. PI. 80. July 1905. 

Parosela domingensis (DC.) Heller (Dalea domingensis DC.), 
host to Calliospora farlowii Arthur n. sp. Bot. Gaz. 39:391. 
June 1905. 

Paxillus flavidus Berk., syn. of Boletinus rhodoxanthus q. v. 
Paxillus paradoxus Cooke, syn. of Boletinus rhodoxanthus q. v. 

Peck, Charles H. New Species of Fungi. Bull. Torr. Bot. Club, 
31 :177-182. Apr. 1904. 

Pellaea andromedaefolia (Kaulf.) Fee, host to Hyalospora pel- 
laeicola Arthur n. sp. Bull. Torr. Bot. Club, 33 :30. Jan. 
1906. 

Pellaea gracilis Hook., host to Hyalospora pellaeicola Arthur 11. 
sp. Bull. Torr. Bot. Club, 33:30. Jan. 1906. 

Pennisetum mexicanum, host to Puccinia arthuri Syn. n. sp. 
[Mexico.] Monogr. Uredin. 1:775. : 5 OH. 1905. 

Peziza fusicarpa Ger. and Peziza semitosta B. & C. Elias J. 
Durand. Jour. Mycol. 12:28-32. Jan. 1906. 

Peziza fusicarpa Ger., syn. of Macropodia fusicarpa q. v. 

Peziza hainesii Ell., syn. of Macropodia semitosta q. v. 

Peziza pubida B. & C., syn. of Macropodia fusicarpa q. v. 

Peziza pubida B. & C. [Note.] A. P. Morgan. Jour. Mycol. 
11:154. July 1905. 

Peziza semitosta B. & C., syn. of Macropodia semitosta q. v. 
Peziza velutina B. & C., syn. of Macropodia fusicarpa q. v. 


116 Journal of Mycology [Vol. 12 

Phacosphaeria lupini Syd. n. sp., in foliis vivis Lupini sparsi- 
flori. Ann. Mycolog. 2:172. March 1904. 

Phaeolopsis Murrill n. gen. Polyporaceae, type Polyporus verae- 
crucis Berk. Bull. Torr. Bot. Club, 32 :48q. Sept. 1905. 

Phaelopsis verae-crucis (Berk.) Murrill n. n. [Polyporus 
verae-crucis Berk.] Bull. Torr. Club, 32:491. Sept. 1905. 

Phellopterus purpurascens, host to Puccinia traversiana Syd. 
n. sp. Monogr. Uredin. 1 :889. 15 Oct. 1904. 

Phyllachora adolphiae Ellis & Kellerm., on Adolpbia infesta. 
[Mexico.] Jour. Mycol. 10:232. Sept. 1904. 

Phyllachoras, Notes on Some, see Notes on ... . 

Phyllodontia magnusii Karst., syn. of Cerrenci unicolor {Bull.) 
Murrill q..v. 

Phyllosticta amphipterygii Ricker n. sp., on Amphipterygium 
amphifolium Hemsl. & Rose. [Mexico.] Jour. Mycol. 11 :iii. 
May 1905. 

Phyllosticta lisianthi Syd n. sp., in foliis Lisianthi exsertis. 
Ann. Mycolog. 2:171. Mar. 1904. 

Pithecolobium dulce (Roxb.) Benth., host to Ravenelia pitheco- 
lobii Arthur n. sp. Bot. Gaz. 39 :394- June 1905. 

Platanus leaves (dead), petioles and veins, host to Marasmius 
felix Morgan n. sp. Jour. Mycol. 12:2. Jan. 1906. 

Pleospora atromaculans Rehm n. sp., ad ramulos emortuos Corni. 
Ann. Mycolog. 2:177. Mar. 1904. 

Pleospora farlowiana Rehm n. sp., ad Selaginellam ruperstrem. 
Ann. Mycolog. 2:177. Mar. 1904. 

Podaxon strobilaceus Copeland n. sp., on a clay bank. Ann. My¬ 
colog. 2 14. Jan. 1904. 

Podocrea alutacea Lindau, syn. of Podostroma alutacea q. v. 

Podospitaera tridactyla, see Minor Mycological Notes, III . . . . 

Podostroma alutacea (Pers.) Atkinson n. n. [Clavaria simplex 
Schmiedel p. p., Sphaeria alutacea Pers., Sph. clavata Bower- 
by, Sph. alutacea b Sphaeria albicans Pers., Sph. alutacea b 
turgida Fr., Cordyceps alutacea Link., Hypocrea alutacea 
Tub, PPodostroma leucopus Karsten, Podocrea alutacea Lin¬ 
dau, Hypocrea lloydii Bresadola.] Bot. Gaz. 40:416. Dec. 
1905. 

? P odostroma leucopus Karsten, syn. of Podostroma alutacea q. v. 

Poinciana pulcherrima L. (Caesalpinia pulcherrima Sw.), host to 
Ravenelia pulcherrima Arthur n. sp. Bot. Gaz. 39:395- 
June 1905. 

Polyporus fractipes B. & C., syn. of Grifolia fractipes q. v. 


May 1906 ] Index to North American Mycology 


117 


Polyporaceae of North America, X. Agaricus, Lenzites, Cer- 
rena and Favolus. William Alphonso Murrill. Bull. Torr. 
Bot. Club, 32:83-103. Feb. 1905. 

Polyporaceae of temperate America, A key to the brown sessile. 
William Alphonso Murrill. Torreya, 5:194-5. Nov. 1905. 

Polyporaceae of North America, XIII. The described species 
of Bjerkandera, Trametes and Coriolus. William Alphonso 
Murrill. Bull. Torr. Bot. Club, 32 :633~656. Dec. 1905. 
Polyporus aesculi Fr., syn. of Agaricus aesculi q. v. 

Polyporus albo-cervinus Berk., syn. of Coriolus brachypus q. v. 
Polyporus arenicolor B. & C., syn. of Coriolus arenicolor q. v. 
Polyporus auberianus Mont., syn. of Fomes auberianus q. v. 
Polyporus aurantiacus Peck, syn . of Pycnoprellus hbrillosus q. v. 
Polyporus brachypus Lev., syn. of Coriolus brachypus q. v. 
Polyporus fragrans Peck, syn. of Bjerkandera fragrans q. v. 
Polyporus hbrillosus Karst., syn. of Pycnoporellus hbrillosus q. v. 
Polyporus habellum Mont., syn. of Polyporus Yabellum q. v. 
Polyporus hirsutus Fr., syn.' of Coriolus nigromarginatus q. v. 
Polyporus hirsutulus Schw., syn. of Coriolus hirsutulus q. v.. . 
Polyporus ilicincola B. & C., syn. of Coriolus ilicincola q. v. 
Polyporus latissimus Fr., syn. of Agaricus quercinus q. v. 
Polyporus obtusus Berk., syn. of Trametes unicolor q. v. 
Polyporus planus Peck, syn. of Coriolus planellus q. v. 
Polyporus polygrammus Mont., syn. of Favolus tenuis q. v. 
Polyporus pubescens Fr., syn. of Coriolus pubescens q. v. 
Polyporus sartwellii B. & C., syn. of Coriolus sartwellii q. v. 

Polyporus sericeo-hirsutus Kl., syn. of Coriolus sericeohirsutus 

q. v. 

Polyporus sobrius B. & C., syn. of Coriolus sobrius q. v. 
Polyporus subluteus Ell. & Ev., syn. of Coriolus subluteus q. v. 
Polyporus sullivantii Mont., syn. of Coriolus sullivantii q. v. 
Polyporus tener Lev., syn. of Coriolus tener q. v. 

Polyporus unicolor Fr., syn. of Trametes unicolor q. v. 

Polyporus verae-crucis Berk., syn. of Phaeolopsis verae-crucis 
q. v. 

Polystictus barbatulus Fr., syn. of Coriolus sericeohirsutus q. v. 
Polystictus hirtellus Fr., syn. of Corilus hirtellus q. v. 

Polystigma pusillum Syd. n. sp., in foliis vivis Andirae excelsae. 
[Quatemala.] Ann. Mycolog. 2:167. Mar. 1904. 


118 Jouriial of Mycology [Vol. 12 

Psathyra multipedata Peck n. sp., grassy ground. Bull. Torr. 
Bot. Club, 32:80. Feb. 1905. 

Pteris aquilina lanuginosa, host to Gloeosporium obtegens Syd. 
n. sp. Ann. Mycolog. 2:172. Mar. 1904. 

Pycnoporellus fibrillosus (Karst.) Murrill n. n. [Polyporus 
fibrillosus Karst., P. aurantiacus Peck, Inonotus fibrillosus 
Karst.] Bull. Torr. Bot. Club, 32:489. Sept. 1905. 

Puccinia actinomeridis Magnus, [not on Actinomeris squarrosa 
as reported but on Verbesina occidentalis], a synonym of 
Puccinia verbesinae Schw. [Ricker.] Jour. Mycol. 11:113. 
May 1905. 

Puccinia aequinoctialis Holway n. sp., on Bigonia aequinoctialis 
L. [Cuba.] Ann. Mycolog. 3:22. Feb. 1905. 

Puccinia albiperidia Arth. [Cultures on Ribes uva-crispa. Kle- 
bahn.] Jour. Mycol. 12-14. Jan. 1906. 

Puccinia albiperidia Arth. [Cultures on Ribes gracilis. Arthur.] 
Jour. Mycol. 12:14. Jan. 1906. 

Puccinia ambicola E. & E., synonym of P. plumbaria Peck. 
[Holway.] Jour. Mycol. 11:268. Nov. 1905. 

Puccinia amphigena Diet. [Cultures on Smilax hispida. Ar¬ 
thur.] Jour. Mycol. 12:16. Jan. 1906. 

Puccinia anachoreta Hark. [Notes and description including 
the uredo. Dudley and Thompson.] Jour. Mycol. 10:52. 
Mar. 1904. 

Puccinia arthuri Syd. n. sp., in foliis vivis Penniseti mexicani. 
[Mexico.] Monogr. Uredin. 1:775. 15 Oct. 1904. 

Puccinia atro-fusca (Dudley & Thompson) Holway n. n. 
[Uromyces atro-fusca Dudley & Thompson.] Jour. Mycol. 
10:228. Sept. 1904. 

Puccinia badia Holway n. sp., on Salvia albicana Fernald, S. 
chrysantha Mart. & Gal., and Salvia sp. [Mexico.] Jour. 
Mycol. 11:158. July 1905. 

Puccinia boutelouae (Jennings) Holway. [Diorchidium bou- 
telouae Jennings, Bull. Tex. Agr. Sta. 9:25. 1890.] [De¬ 

scription and notes. Holway.] Ann. Mycolog. 3:20. Feb. 
1905. 

Puccinia buchloes Syd. Mon. Ured. non Schofield, syn. of Puc¬ 
cinia kanscnsis q. v. 

Puccinia canaliculata (Schw.) Lagerh. [Cultures on Cyperus 
esculentus. Arthur.] Jour. Mycol. 12:23. Jan. 1906. 

Puccinia caricis-solidaginis Arth. [Cultures on Solidago cana¬ 
densis. Arthur.] Jour. Mycol. 12:15. Jan. 1906. 

Puccinia caricis (Schum.) Reb. [Cultures on Urtica gracilis. 
Arthur.] Jour. Mycol. 12:15. Jan. 1906. 


May 1906 ] Index to North American Mycology 119 

Puccinia distichlidis E. & E., syn. of P. kelseyi q. v. 

Puccinia distorta Holway n. sp., on Mesosphaerum pectinatum 
(L.) Kunze, and Mesosphaerum sp. Ann. Myocolg. 3:22. 
Feb. 1905. 

Puccinia dolochi Arthur n. sp., on Dolichos reticulatus Hockst., 
Aguacate. [Cuba.] Bull. Torr. Bot. Club, 33:28. Jan. 
1906. 

Puccinia eleocharidis Arth. [Cultures on Eupatorium perfolia- 
tum. Arthur.] Jour. Mycol. 12:23. Jan. 1906. 

Puccina exasperans Holway n. sp., on Bouteloua (Atheropo- 
gon) curtipendulus (Mx.) and B. pringlei Scrib. [Mexico.] 
Ann. Mycolog. 3:21. Feb. 1905. 

Puccinia fimbristylidis Arthur n. sp., on Fimbrystilis polymor- 
pha Breckl., F. hohvayana Fernald, and Fimbrystilis sp. 
[Mexico.] Bull. Torr. Bot. Club, 33:28. Jan. 1906. 

Puccinia fragilis Tracy & Gall. [In Baker, Tracy & Earle, 
Plants of So. Cal. 423 a are P. plumbaria Peck on Phlox (P. 
longifolia ?). Holway.] Jour. Mycol. 11:268. Nov. 1905. 

Puccinia fraxianta (Schw.) Arth. [Cultures on Fraxinus lan- 
ceolata. Arthur.] Jour. Mycol. 12:16. Jan. 1906. 

Puccinia fumosa Holway n. sp., on Loeselia coccinea Don., L. 
glandulosa, and L. ciliata. [Mexico.] Ann. Mycolog. 3:23. 
Feb. 1905. 

Puccinia gouaniae Holway n. sp., on Gouania tomentosa Jacq. 

[Cuba.] Ann. Mycolog. 3:21. Feb. 1905. 

Puccinia grindeliae Pk. [Cultures on Gutierrezia sarothrae. 

Arthur.] Jour. Mycol. 12:21. Jan. 1906. 

Puccinia guillemineae Diet, et Holw. [type had only teleuto- 
spores, collected in Mexico with uredo and aecidia; descrip¬ 
tion. Holway.] Ann. Mlcolog. 3:22. Feb. 1905. 

Puccinia helianthi Schw. [Cultures on Helianthus annuus and 
H. grosse-serratus. Arthur.] Jour. Mycol. 12:18. Jan. 
1906. 

Puccinia infrequens Holway n. sp., on Salvia cinnabarina Mart. 
& Gal. [Mexico.] Jour. Mycol. 11:158. July 1905. 

Puccinia kansensis Ell. & Barthol. Eryth. 4:1. [P. buchloes 

Syd. Monogr. Ured. 1.740 non P. buchloes Schofield, Web¬ 
ber, App. FI. Nebr.] Ann. Mycolog. 3:20. Feb. 1905. 

Puccinia kelseyi Syd. n. n. [P. distichlidis E. & E.] In foliis 
vivis Spartinae gracilis, cynosuroidis. Monogr. Uredin. 
1:8o6. 15 Oct. 1904. 

Puccinia kreageri Ricker n. sp., on leaves of Festuca subulata 
Trin. (F. jonesii Vasey). Jour. Mycol. 11:114. May 1905. 

Puccinia kuhniae Schw. [Cultures on Kuhnis eupatorioides. 
Arthur.] Jour. Mycol. 12:23. Jan. 1906. 




120 Journal of Mycology [Vol. 12 

Puccinia latcripes B. & Br. [Cultures on Ruellia ciliosa and R. 
strepens. Arthur.] Jour. Mycol. 12:18. Jan. 1906. 

Puccinia leptospora Ricker n. sp., on Trisetum virletii Fourn. 
[Mexico.] Jour. Mycol. 11:114. May 1905. 

Puccinia luxuriosa Syd. 11. sp. [P. tosta var. luxurians Arth.] 
In foliis vivis Sporobolis airoidis. Monogr. Uredin. 1:8i2. 
15 Oct. 1904. 

Puccinia micromeriae Dudley & Thompson n. sp., on Microme- 
ria chamissonis. Jour. Mycol. 10:54. Mar. 1904. 

Puccinia monardellae Dudley & Thompson n. sp., on Monardel- 
la villosa, M. undulata; distributed under Puccinia menthae 
Pers. F. Columb. No. 1886.] Jour. Mycol. 10:53. Mar. 1904. 

Puccinia moreniana Dudley and Thompson n. sp., on Brodiaea 
capitata. Jour. Mycol. 10:53. Mar. 1904. 

Puccinia nivea Holway n. sp., on Salvia purpurea Cav. [Mexi¬ 
co.] Jour. Mycol. 11:158. July 1905. 

Puccinia nodosa Ell. & Hark. [Description; aecidia and uredo 
not before reported on Brodiaea capitata. Dudley & Thomp¬ 
son.] Jour. Mycol. 10:52. Mar. 1904. 

Puccinia oblicus B. & C., synonym of P. lateritia B. & C. [Hol¬ 
way.] Jour. Mycol. 11:268. Nov. 1905. 

Puccinia pammelii (Trek) Arth. [Cultures on Euphorbia corol- 
lata. Arthur.] Jour. Mycol. 12:16. Jan. 1906. 

Puccinia paradoxica Ricker n. sp., on Melica smithii (Porter) 
Vasey. Jour. Mycol. 11:114. May 1905. 

Puccinia pattersoniae Syd. n. sp., on foliis vaginisque Tripsaci 
dactyloidis. Monogr. Uredin. 1:820. 15 Oct. 1904. 

Puccinia pattersoniana Arthur n. sp., on Agropyron spicatum 
(Pursh.) Rydb. Bull. Torr. Bot. Club, 33:29. Jan. 1906. 

Puccinia peckii (DeT.) Kellerm. [Cultures on Onagra biennis. 
Arthur.] Jour. Mycol. 12:15. Jan. 1906. 

Puccinia piperi Ricker n. sp., on Festuca pacifica Piper ined. 
Jour. Mycol. 11:114. May 1905. 

Puccinia poculiformis (Jacq.) Wettst. [Cultures on Berberis 
vulgaris. Arthur.] Jour. Mycol. 12:17. J an - 1906. 

Puccinia polygoni-amphibii Pers. [Cultures on Geranium 
maculatum. Arthur.] Jour. Mycol. 12:18. Jan. 1906. 

Puccinia pruni-spinosae Pers. [Cultures with aecidiospores 
(Aecidium hepaticatum Schw.) on Prunus serotina. Arthur.] 
Jour. Mycol. 12:18. Jan. 1906. 

Puccinia purpusii P. Henn. [Reported on Arabis, is P. plum- 
baria Pk., on some Phlox or closely allied genus. Holway.] 
Jour. Mycol. 11:268. Nov. 1905. 


May 1906] Index to North American Mycology 


121 


Puccini a pustulata (Curt.) Arthur. [Cultures on Comandra 
umbellata. Arthur.] Jour. Mycol. 12:16. Jan. 1906. 

Puccinia rubricans Holway, syn of Puccinia sanguinolenta P. 
Henn. [Holway.] Ann. Mycolog. 3:24. Feb. 1905. 

Puccinia sambuci (Schw.) Arth. [Cultures on Sambucus cana¬ 
densis. Arthur.] Jour. Mycol. 12:14. Jan. 1906. 

Puccinia sanguinolenta P. Henn. [host said to be of Myrtaceae, 
S. Am.; syn.: Puccinia rubricana Holway, host one of Mal- 
pighiaceae, Heteropteris. Host of former is a Heteroptis. 
Holway.] Ann. Mycolog. 3 :24. Feb. 1905. 

Puccinia scandica Johans, [alpine regions of Sweden, now col¬ 
lected in Utah, alt. 8,900 ft., on Epilobium alpinum, and in 
Washington on E. clavatum. Holway.] Ann. Mycolog. 
3:23. Feb. 1905. 

Puccinia seymouriana Arth. [Cultures on Cephalanthus occi- 
dentalis. Arthur.] Jour. Mycol. 12:24. Jan. 1906. 

Puccinia silphii Schw. [Cultures on Silphium integrifolium. 
Arthur.] Jour. Mycol. 12:21. Jan. 1906. 

Puccinia solidaginis Pk. [Cultures on Solidago canadensis. Ar¬ 
thur.] Jour. Mycol. 12:22. Jan. 1906. 

Puccinia sorghi. [Cultures on Oxalis. Kellerman.] Jour. My¬ 
col. 12:10. Jan. 1906. 

Puccinia sorghi, culture experiments, 1905, [Kellerman], see 
Uredineous .... 

Puccini sorghi Schw. [Cultures on Oxalis cymosa. Arthur.] 
Jour. Mycol. 12:17. Jan. 1906. 

Puccinia subnitens Diet. [Cultures on Erysinum asperum, So¬ 
phia incisa, Lepidium virginicum, and Bursa bursa-pastoris. 
Arthur.] Jour. Mycol. 12:17. Jan. 1906. 

Puccinia substerilis E. & E. [Cultures of amphispores on Stipa 
viridula, failure of teleutospores on Aster ericoides, A. multi- 
florus, and A. novae-angliae, hence this rust not the same as 
P. stipae. Arthur.] Jour. Mycol. 12:24. Jan. 1906. 

Puccinia tosta var. luxurians Arth., syn. of P. luxuriosa q. v. 

Puccinia transformans E. & E. [Cultures on Stenolobium stans 
(Tecoma stans). Arthur.] Jour. Mycol. 12:22. Jan. 1906. 

Puccinia traversiana Syd. n. sp., in foliis vivis Phellopteri pur- 
purascentis. Mongr. Uredin. 1:889. 15 Oct. 1904. 

Puccinia uniformis Pammel & Hume, synonym of P. bistortae 
(Sta.) DC. [Holway.] Jour. Mycol. 11:268. Nov. 1905. 

Puccinia verbenicola (E. & K.) Arth. [Cultures on Verbena 
urticaefolia. Arthur.] Jour. Mycol. 12:16. Jan. 1906. 

Puccinia xanthii Schw. [Cultures on Xanthium canadense. Ar¬ 
thur.] Jour. Mycol. 12:20. Jan. 1906. 


122 


Journal of Mycology 


[Vol. 12 


Pyrenomycetes of Orleans County, N. Y. Charles Fairman. 
Proc. Rochester Acad. Sci. 4:165-191. 2 Sept. 1905. 

Pyrenomycetes scarcely known in North America. [Notes on 
a few species.] A. P. Morgan. Jour. Mycol. 10:226. Sept. 
1904. 

Pyrenopeziza cephalanthi Fairman n. sp., on dead limbs of 
Caphalanthus occidentalis. . Jour. Mycol. 10:229. Sept. 

1904. 

Ouercus, bark, host to Clypeosphaeria pseudobufonia Relim. n. 
sp. Ann. Mycolog. 2:176. Mar. 1904. 

Quercus, wood, host to Xylaria (Xylodactyla) longiana Rehm 
n. sp. Ann. Mycolog. 2:175. Mar. 1904. 

Ouercus densiflora, host to Marasmius copelandi Peck n. sp. 
Bull. Torr. Bot. Club 31.182. Apr. 1904. 

Ravenelia gracilis Arthur 11. sp., on an undetermined species of 
Mimosaceae, Mexico. Bot. Gaz. 39:393. June 1905. 

Ravenelia inconspicua Arthur n. sp., on Cassia (or Caesalpinia) 
sp., Mexico. Bot. Gaz. 39:395. June 1905. 

Ravenelia lysilomae Arthur n. sp., on Lysiloma tergemina 
Benth., Mexico. Bot. Gaz. 39:392. June 1905. 

Ravenelia pithecolobii Arthur 11. sp., on Pithecolobium dulce 
Roxb.) Benth., Mexico. Bot. Gaz. 39:394. June 1905. 

Ravenelia pulcherrima Arthur 11. sp., on Poinciana pulcherrima 
L. (Caesalpinia pulcherrima Sw.), Mexico. Bot. Gaz. 39:395. 
June 1905. 

Red cedar, host to Agaricus juniperus Murrill n. sp. Bull. Torr. 
Bot. Club, 32 :85. Feb. 1905. 

Rehm, H. Ascomycetes Americae borealis. Ann. Mycolog. 
2:175-8. 1904. 

Remarkable occurrence of Morchella esculenta (L.) Pers. W. 
C. Sturgis. Jour. Mycol. 11:269. Nov. 1905. 

Review of: Jaczewski, A. A. Yearbook of Information concern¬ 
ing Diseases and Injuries of Cultivated and Wild Economic 
Plants. First Year. 1903. pp. 166. St. Petersburg, 1904. 
Russian. Ernst A. Bessey. Jour. Mycolg. 11:170-9. July 

1905. 

Rhodosporae, Rosy-spored Agarics. [The genus Clitopilus.] H. 
C. Beardslee. Jour. Mycol. 11:109-110. PI. 76-77. May 
1905. 

Rhynchosia texana T. & G., see Dolicholus texanus . . . . 

Rhynchostoma americanum (E. & E.) Morgan n. n. [R. cor- 
nigerum Karst, var. americana (E. & E.).] Jour. Mycol. 
10:227. Sept. 1904. 

Rhynchostoma cornigerum Karst, var. americana E. & E., syn . 
of Rhynchostoma americanum q . v. 


May 1906]. Index to North American Mycology 


123 


Ricker, P. L. Notes on Fungi II, with New Species from Vari¬ 
ous Localities. Jour. Mycol. 11:111-5. May 1905. 

Rostovtsev, S. I. Contributions to the knowledge of the False 
Mildews (Peronosporaceae). [Review. Ernst A. Bessey.] 
Jour. Mycol. 11:270-1. Nov. 1905. 

Rosy-spored Agarics or Rhodosporae. [The genus Clitopilus.] 
H. C. Beardslee. Jour. Mycol. 11:109-110. PI. 76-77. 
May 1905. 

Russula luteobasis Peck n. sp. Bull. Torr. Bot. Club, 31 :i79-> 
Apr. 1904. 

Rusts, Leguminous, from Mexico. J. C. Arthur. Bot. Gaz. 
39 : 3 8 S- 39 6 - J l ' ne I 9 °S- 

Rust Notes for 1904. J. M. Bates. Jour. Mycol. 11:116. May 
I9 ° 5 ' 

Rusts, Sexual Reproduction in. A. H. Christman. Bot. Gaz. 
39:267-275. PI. VIII. April 1905. 

Saccardo; de Diagnostica et nomenclatura mycologica; Admo- 
nita quaedam. Translated by Frederic E. Clements. Jour. 
Mycol. 10:109-112. May 1904. 

Saggio di una monografia del genere Triphragmium. M. Milesi 
e. G. B. Traverso. Ann. Mycolog. 2:143-156. Mar. 1904. 

Salvia albicans Fernald, host to Puccinia badia Holway n. sp. 
Jour. Mycol. 11:158. July 1905. 

Salvia chrysantha Mart. & Gal., host to Puccinia badia Holway 
n. sp. Jour. Mycol. 11:158. July 1905. 

Salvia cinnabarina Mart. & Gal., host to Puccinia infrequens 
Holway n. sp. [Mexico.] Jour. Mycol. 11:158. July 1905. 

Salvia purpurea Cav., host to Puccinia nivea Holway n. sp. Jour. 
Mycol. 11:158. July 1905. 

Salvia Rusts, see North American Salvia Rusts .... 

Salvia sp., host to Puccinia badia Holway n. sp. Jour. Mycol. 
11:158. July 1905. 

Saprolegniales, Fertilization in. A. H. Trow. Bot. Gaz. 39:300. 
April 1905. 

Saprolegniales, Fertilization in. B. M. Davis. Bot. Gaz. 39:6i- 
4. Jan. 1905. 

Sarcoscypita pubida B. & C., syn. of Macropodia fusicarpa q. v. 
Sarcoscypha semitosta B. & C., syn. of Macropodia semitosta 
q. v. 

Scirpus atrovirens Miihl., host to Synchytrium scirpi Davis n. 
sp. Jour. Mycol. 11:156. July 1905. 

Selaginella rupestris, host to Pleospora farlowiana Rehm n. sp. 
Ann. Mycolog. 2:177. Mar. 1904. 


124 


Journal of Mycology 


LVol. 12 


Septoria albo-maculans Syd. n. sp., in foliis vivis Eupatorii nubi- 
geni. [Guatemala]. Ann. Mycolog. 2:171. Mar. 1904. 

Sepotria mirabilis Peck, syn. of Uredinopsis mirabUis q. v. 

Sexual Reproduction in the Rusts. A. H. Christman. Bot. 
Gaz. 39:267-275. PL VIII. April 1905. 

Sphaeria alutacea Pers., syn. of Podostroma alutacea q. v. 
Sherman, Helen. The Host Plants of Panaeolus Epimyces Peck. 
Jour. Mycol. 11:167-9. July 1905. 

Sieglingia purpurea (Welt.) Kunze, host to Ustilago sieglingiae 
Ricker n. sp. Jour. Mycol. 11:112. May 1905. 

Sistrotrema cinereum Pers., syn. of Cerrena unicolor {Bull.) 
Murrill q. v. 

Smith, Clayton O. A New Egg Plant Fungus [Ascochyta lyco- 
persici Brun.] Jour. Mycol. 10:98-9. May 1904. 

Spartina cynosuroides, host to Puccinia kelseyi Syd. n. n. 
Monogr. Uredin. 1:8o6. 15 Oct. 1904. 

Spartina gracilis, host to Puccinia kelseyi Syd. n. n. Monogr. 
Uredin. 1:806. 15 Oct. 1904. 

Sphaeria clavata Sowerby, syn. of Podostroma alutacea q. v. 

Sphaeria alutacea b Sph. albicans Pers., syn. o\f Podostroma 
alutacea q. v. 

Sphaeria alutacea b turgida Fr., syn. of P0dr0stoma alutacea 
q. v. 

Sphaeropsis hamamelidis FI. Tassi n. sp., in cortice Hamame- 
lidis virginicae. Bull. Lab. ed Orto Bot. 6:126. 1904. 

Sphaeropsis thalictri Ellis & Fairm, n. sp., on dead stems of 
Thalictrum sp. Jour. Mycol. 10:229. Sept. 1904. 

Discard Spaeropsora durandi Rehm. n. sp ., and substitute: 

Sphaerospora durandi Rehm n. sp., ad humum. Ann. Mycolog. 
2:36. Jan. 1904. 

Sphaerulina oxalidis Rehm n. sp., ad caules emortuos Oxalidis 
strictae. Ann. Mycolog. 2:177. Mar. 1904. 

Sporobolis airoides, host to Puccinia luxuriosa Syd. n. sp. 
Monogr. Uredin. 1:8i2. 15 Cct. 1904. 

SpoRE-structures, Terminology, see Terminology of. . . . 

Striglia Adams., [Murrill], syn. of Agaricus (Dill.) L. Bull. 
Torr. Bot. Club, 32 :83- Feb. 1905. 

Stropitaria schraderi Peck n. sp., sandy grassy soil about stumps. 
Bull. Torr. Bot. Club, 32:80. Feb. 1905. 

Sturgis, W. C. Remarkable occurrence of Morchella esculenta 
(L.) Pers. Jour. Mycol. 11:269. Nov. 1905. 

Suggestions from the study of Dairy Fungi. Charles Thom. 
[Plan for obtaining more definite knowledge of the forms.] 
Jour. Mycol. 11:177-124. May 1905. 


May 1906] Index to North American Mycology 


125 


Sumstine, D. R. Gomphidius Rhodoxanthus Once More. 
[Note and synonomy] Jour. Mycol. n :i65~i66. July 1905. 

Sumstine, D. R. Another Fly Agaric. [Amanita olitoria Bull.] 
Jour. Mycol. 11:267. Nov. 1905. 

Sydow, H. et P. Novae Fungorum species. [Nearly fifty species 
of which about half a dozen are North American.] Ann. 
Mycolog. 2:162-174. Mar. 1904. 

Symbiosis in the genus Lolium. E. M. Freeman. Minn. Bot. 
Studies, 3 :329~334. 18 Oct. 1904. 

Synchytrium A New Species of [S. scripi.] J. J. Davis. 
Jour. Mycol. 11:154-6. July 1905. 

Synchytrium scirpi Davis n. sp., on leaves of Scirpus atrovirens 
Miihl. Jour. Mycol. 11:156. July 1905. 

Terminology of the spore-structures in the Uredinales. J. C. 
Arthur. Bot. Gaz. 39:219-222. March 1905. 

Testicularia leersiae Cornu, syn. of Tolypospcrhim globulife- 
rum q. v. 

Thalictrum sp., dead stems, host to Sophaeropsis thalictri Ellis 
& Fairm. Jour. Mycol. 10:229. Sept. 1904. 

Thaxter, Roland. A new American species of Wynnea. Bot. 
Gaz. 39:241-7. PI. IV-V. April 1905. 

Thecaphora globulifera B. & Br., syn. of Tolyposporium glo- 
buliferum q. v. 

Thom, Charles. Some Suggestions from the study of Dairy 
Fungi. [Plan for obtaining more definite knowledge of the 
forms.] Jour. Mycol. 11:177-124. May 1905. 

Thompson, C. H. and Dudley, W. R., see Dudley, W R. and . . 

Thouinia acuminata, host to Melasmia thouiniae Syd. n. sp. 
[Mexico]. Ann. Mycolog. 2:171. Mar. 1904. 

Tilia americana, wood, host to Lasiosphaeria ovina aureliana 
Fairman n. var. Jour. Mycol. 10:230. Sept. 1904. 

Tilletia eragostidis Clinton & Ricker n. sp., on Eragrostis glom- 
erata (Walt.) Dewey. Jour. Mycol. 11:111. May 1905. 

Tolyposporium globuliferum (B. & Br.) Ricker n. n. [Theo- 
caphora globulifera B. & Br., Testicularia leersiae Cornu, 
Ustilago leersiae Durieu.] Jour. Mycol. 11 :ii2. May .1905. 

Tomophagus Murrill n. n. [Dendrophagus Murrill]. Torreya, 
5 :i97. Nov. 1905. 

Tomophagus for Dendrophagus. William A. Murrill. Torreya, 
5:197. Nov. 1905. 

Tomophagus colossus (Fr.) Murrill n. n. [Dendrophagus colos¬ 
sus (Fr.) Murrill]. Torreya, 5:197. Nov. 1905. 

Trametes, see Polyporaceae of North America, XIII. The de¬ 
scribed species of. .. . 


126 


Journal of Mycology 


[Vol. 12 


Trametes ambigua Fr., syn. of Agaricus aesculi q. v. 

Tr a metes berkeleyi Cooke, syn. of Agaricus aesculi q. v. 
Trametes centralis Fr., syn. of Agaricus deplanatus q. v. 
Trametes elegans Fr., syn. of Agaricus deplanatus q. v. 
Trametes incana Berk., syn. of Agaracus aesculi q. v. 

Trametes lactea Fr., syn. of Agaracus aesculi q. v. 

Trametes rubescens Fr., syn. of Agaricus confragosus {Bolt.) 
Mur rill q. v. 

Trametes, synopsis [key] of the North American species. [Mur- 
rill]. Bull. Torr. Bot. Club, 32:637. Dec. 1905. 

Trametes unicolor (Schw.) Murrill n. n. [Boletus unicolor 
Scliw., Polyporus unicolor Fr., P. obtusus Berk.] Bull. Torr. 
Bot. Club, 32 :638. Dec. 1905. 

Tricholoma viscosum Peck. n. so. Bull. Torr. Bot. Club, 
31 \ijj. Apr. 1904. 

Triosteum angustifolium L., host to Aecidium triostei Arthur 
n. sp. Bull. Torr. Bot. Club, 33 132. Jan. 1906. 

Triphragmium [monograph, Milesi e Traverso], see Saggio 
di .... 

Tripsacus dactyloides, host to> Puccinia pattersoniae. Monogr. 
Uredin. 1 :820. 15 Oct. 1904. 

Trisetum virletii Fourn., host to Puccinia leptospora Ricker n. 
sp. Jour. Mycol. 11:114. May 19 1905. 

Trow, A. H. Fertilization in the Saprolegniales. Bot. Gaz. 
39:300. April 1905. 

Tubercularia fasciculata Tode. [Note]. A. P. Morgan. Jour. 
Mycol. 10:97-8. May 1904. 

Two New Haplosporellas. J. B. Ellis and E. Bartholomew. 
Jour. Mycol. 11:108. May 1905. 

Uncinula parvula [note], see Minor Mycological Notes, IV. . . 

Uredineae Californian [Dudley and Thompson], see Notes 
on . 

Uredineae, cultures of in 1905, [Arthur], see Cultures . 

Uredineae, New Species [Holway], see North American Uredi¬ 
neae .... 

Uredineae, New Species of. IV. Joseph Charles Arthur. 

Bull. Torr. Bot. Club, 33-27-34. Jan. 1906. 

Uredineae, Notes on. III. E. W. D. Holway. Jour. Mycol. 
10:228. Sept. 1904. 

Uredineae, Notes on. IV. E. W. D. Holway. Jour. Mycol. 
11:268. Nov. 1905. 

Uredineous culture experiments with Puccinia sorghi. [4th An. 
Report]. W. A. Kellerman. Jour. Mycol. 12:9-11. Jan. 
1906. 


May 1906] 


Index to North American Mycology 


127 


Uredinopsis americana Syd., a synonym of U. mirabilis (Peck) 
P. Magn. [ Magnus] Hedwigia, 43:122. 24 Mar. 1904. 

Uredinopsis atkinsonii P. Magn. n. sp., on Aspidium thelypteris. 
Hedwigia, 43:123. 24 Mar. 1904. 

Uredinopsis mirabilis (Peck) Magnus n. n. [Septoria mirabilis 
Pk.] Hedwigia, 43:21. 24 Mar. 1904. 

Uredinopsis osmundae P. Magn. n. sp., on Osmunda cinnamo- 
mea. Hedwigia, 43:123. 24 Mar. 1904. 

Uredo 1 aeschynomenis Arthur n. sp., on Aeschynomene americana 
L., Merico. Bot. Gaz. 39:392. June 1905. 

Uredo dichromenae Arthur n. sp., on Dichromena ciliata Vahl., 
and D, radicans Cham. & Schl. [Porto Rico]. Bull. Torr. 
Bot. Club, 33:31. Jan. 1906. 

Uromyces acuminatus Arth. [Cultures on Steironema ciliatum. 
Arthur]. Jour. Mycol. 12:24. Jan. 1906. 

Uromyces atro-fusca Dudley & Thompson, syn. of Puccinia atro- 
fnscci q. v. 

Uromyces bauhiniicola Arthur n. sp., on Bauhinia pringlei Wats., 
and Bauhinia sp., Mexico. Bot. Gaz. 39:389. June 1905. 

Uromyces caricis Peck [is the amphisporic form of Puccinia 
caricis (Schum.) Reb. Arthur]. Jour. Mycol. 12:15. Jan. 
1906. 

Uromyces clingyi Pat. & Har., on Andropogon schotti Rupr., 
A hirtiflorus Kth., and A. liebmannii Hack. [New descrip¬ 
tion. Rickr.] Jour. Mycol. 11:115. May 1905. 

Uromyces clitorae Arthur n. sp., on Clitoria mexicana Link., 
Mexico. Bot. Gaz. 39:389. June 1905. 

Uromyces cologaniae Arthur n. sp., on Cologania pulchella H. 
B. K., C congesta Rose, Cologania sp., Mexico. Bot. Gaz. 
39:387. June 1905. 

Uromyces dolicholi Arthur n. sp., on Dolicholus Texanus (T. & 
G.) Vail (Rhynchosia texana T. & G.) Bull. Torr. Club, 
33 :27. Jan. 1906. 

Uromyces gentianae Arth. [type locality Decorah Iowa, on Gen- 
tiana quinquefolia occidentalis Hitchcock; collected in Mex¬ 
ico, on Gentiana acuta Mx., alt. 10000 ft., also on Gentiana 
Englm. in Colorado. Holway]. An. Mycolog. 3:22. Feb. 

I9 ° 5 ’ 

Uromyces hyperici (Schw.) Cart, [collected in Mexico on Hy¬ 
pericum sp. Holway]. Ann. Mycolog. 3:22. Feb. 1905. 

Uromyces montanus Arthur n. sp., on Lupinus mexicanus H. 
B. K., Mexico. Bot. Gaz. 39:386. June 1905. 

Uromyces oblonga Vize. [On Trifolium, not on “Burr Clover;” 
identical with U. minor Schroeter. Holway]. Jour. Mycol. 
11:268. Nov. 1905. 


128 


Journal of Mycology 


[Vol. 12 


Uromyces rugosa Arthur n. sp., on Lupinus sp., Mexico. Bot. 
Gaz. 39:386. June 1905. 

Uromyces speciosus Holway n. sp., on Frasera macrophylla 
Greene. Ann. Mycolog. 3 123. Feb. 1905. 

Ustilaginoidea strumosa (Cke.) Clint, n. n. [Ustilago stru- 
mosa Cke.] Jour. Mycol. 11:112. May 1905. 

Ustilago leersiae Durieu, syn. of Tolyposporium globuliferum 

q. v. 

Ustilago sieglingiae Ricker n. sp., on Sieglingia purpurea 
(Walt.) Kunze. Jour. Mycol. 11:112. May 1905. 

Ustilago strumosa Cke., syn. of Ustiloginoidea strumosa q. v. 
Proc. Rochester Acad. Sci. 4:189. 2 Sept. 1905. 

Variability in our common species of Dictyophora. A. H. 
Christman. Jour. Mycol. 10:101-108. May 1904. 

Washington Erysiphaceae, see Notes on the Erysiphaceae . . . 

Vitis sp., stem, host to Dermatea puberula Durand n. sp. Jour. 
Mycol. 10:101. May 1904. 

Wynnea americana Thaxter n. sp., growing on the ground in 
rich woods. Bot. Gaz. 39:246. April 1905. 

Wynnea, A New American species of. Roland Thaxter. Bot. 

Gaz. 39:24i~7. PI. IV-V. April 1905. 

Xenoparasitism [a term to describe those cases where a form of 
a fungus which is specialized to certain host-species and con¬ 
fined to them under normal circumstances proves able to 
infect injured parts of a strange host. Ernest S. Salmon]. 
Ann. Mycolog. 3:11. Feb. 1905. 

Xylaria (Xylodactyla) longiana Rehm n. sp., ad lignum Ouer- 
cus. Ann. Mycolog. 2:175. Mar. 1904. 


NOTES FROM MYCOLOGICAL LITERATURE, XIX. 

w. A. KELLERMAN. 

Fungi esculentes Philippinenses, Edwin Bingham 
Copeland, Annales Mycologici, Feb. 1905 [3:25-9] contains La¬ 
tin descriptions of a species of Lycoperdon, nine species of Co- 
prinus, two species of Panaeolus, five species of Agaricus (Psal- 
liota), and four species of Lepiota, all proposed as new by the 
author. 

M. C. Cooke PUBLISHES AN EXTENDED ACCOUNT OF THE 
Fungoid Pests of Forest trees in the Journal of the Royal Hor¬ 
ticultural Society, vol. XXIX, 1905, Part IV, pp. 361-391, PI. 



March 1906 ] Notes from Mycological Literature 


129 


XIX-XXI. Popular descriptions are given, also 1 notes and distri¬ 
bution. The three colored plates illustrate habit and spore char¬ 
acters of 54 species. 

On a Fungus Disease of Euonymus Japonicus L.f., by 
Ernest S. Salmon. In this we find an interesting account, with 
two full-page illustrations of Oidium euonymi-japonici (Arc.) 
Sacc. which occurs in Italy, Austria, Hungary, France and Eng¬ 
land. Experiments by Mr. Salmon showed that the following 
sorts were susceptible: E. japonicus aureus, albo-marginatus, 
ovatus-aureus, microphyllus, Silver-Gem. The immune kinds 
were E. Japonicus carrierei, E. nanus, E. europaeus, E. chinensis 
and E. americanus. See Journal of the Royal Horticultural So¬ 
ciety, vol. XXIX, part 4, Dec. 1905, pp. 434-442. 

The Table of Contents of the Journal of Mycology 
for July 1905 (vol. 11) is as follows: Morgan, A New Species 
of Kalmusia, and Peziza Pubida B. & C.; Davis, A New Species 
of Svnchytrium; Holway, North American Salvia-Rusts; Clev¬ 
enger, Notes on Some North American Phyllachoras; Lawrence, 
Blackspot Canker and Blackspot Apple Rot; Sumstine, Gom- 
phidius Rhodoxanthus Once More; Sherman, Host Plants of 
Panaeolus epimyces; Bessey, Yearbook of Information Concern¬ 
ing Diseases and Injuries of Cultivated and Wild Economic 
Plants; Kellerman, Notes from Mycological Literature XVI, and 
Index to North American Mycology; Editor’s Notes. 

The Ier Fascicule, tome XXI, Bulletin de la Societe 
Mycologique de France, published 18 Feb. 1905, contains the fol¬ 
lowing original articles: L. Rolland, Les champignons des iles 
Beleares (suite) ; F. Gueguen, Effet singulier de la croissance 
d’un champignon de couche; F. Gueguen, Sur l’emploi des bleus 
pour coton et pour laine dans la technique mycologique; L. Lutz, 
Sur les principaux modes de formation des hymeniums surnum- 
eraires dans les champignons; Bourguelot et Herissey, Sur la 
trehalase, sa presence generale dans les champignons; Dr. Gillot, 
Empoisonnement par les champignons. 

Uredineae Japonicae VI., von P. Dietel, in Eng. Bot. 
Jahrb. 37:97-109, 19 Sept. 1905, contains species (among which 
many are new), of Uromyces, Puccinia, Phragmidium, Ravenelia, 
Melampsora, Melampsoridium, Pucciniastrum, Klastopsora, Cro- 
nartium, Hyalopsora, Ochrosora, Coleosporium, Chrysomyxa, 
Aecidium, Peridermium, and Uredo. “Von besonderem Interesse 
sind ferner, wie wir schon frfiher hervorgehoben haben, solche 
Arten, die sich auch in anderen Erdteilen, namentlich in Nord- 
amerika, teilweise in etwas anderen Formen wiederfinden. Hierzu 
wolle man unter die Bemerkungen fiber Uromyces brevipes und 
U. ovalis vergleichen.” Extended notes on many species occur, 
e. g. on Puccinia lactucae Diet.; P. Lactucae denticulatae Diet. 


[Vol. 12 


130 Journal of Mycology 

n. sp. is given, host Lactuca denticulata, with spores smaller than 
the foregoing. 

Fungi Africae orientalis IV, von P. Hennings, Eng. 
Bot. Jahrb. 37:102-118, 3 Okt. 1905, is an enumeration of col¬ 
lections made in 1903, with notes and localities. A large number 
of new species is described. A new genus, Phragmidiella, is pro¬ 
posed, placed between Phragmidium and Kiihneola. 

P. Hennings, Fungi camerunensis IV, Eng. Bot. Jahrb. 
38:119-129, Okt. 1905, continues the annotated list begun in pre¬ 
vious Nos. of the same Journal, describing a large number of 
new species. 

Otto Jaap, Fungi Selecti Exsiccati. Serie VI. Aus- 
gegeben im November 1905, consists of the following: 

126. Urophlyctis Kriegeriana. Schweiz. 127. Taphridium umbelli- 
ferarum f. heraclei. Schweiz. 128. Coudonia Osterwaldii. n. sp. Mark. 
129. Lachnum controversum f. caricincola. n. f. Mark. 130. Peizizella 
Jaapii. n. sp. Mark. 131. Belonium junci. n. sp. Mark. 132. Propolis 
rhodoleuca. n. matr. Danemark. 133. Cucurbitaria pityophila. Mark. 
134. Pleospora media, n. matr. Schleswig. 135. Melampsora reticulatae. 
Schweiz. 136. Uromyces alchimillae alpinae. Schweiz. 137. Uromyces 
sparsus. Holstein. 138. Puccinia moliniae. Mark. 139. Puccinia cru- 
ciferarum. Savoyen. 140. Pucciana gigantea. Schweiz. 141. Corticum 
typhae var. caricicola. Mary. 142. Hydnum fuligineo-album. Mark! 
143. Hypholoma storea f. caespitosa. Mark! 144. Mutinus caninus. Hol¬ 
stein. 145. Mycogone Jaapii. n. sp. Mark. 146. Ramularia spiraeae 
arunci. Schwarzwald. 147. Ramularia evanida. Schweiz. 148. Ramu¬ 
laria prenanthis. n. sp. Schwarzwald. 149. Passalora bacilligera f. alno- 
betulae. n. f. Schweiz. 150. Fusicladium Schnablianum. n. matr. Schweiz. 

Agricultural Bacteriology by FI. W. Conn, published by 
P. Blakiston’s Son & Co., pp. 1-412, 1901, is a study of the rela¬ 
tion of bacteria to agriculture with special reference to bacteria in 
the soil, in water in the dairy, in miscellaneous farm products and 
in plants and domestic animals. The author does not attempt to 
confine himself strictly to bacteriology — as for instance he says 
“it has been a growing conviction that a considerable number of 
phenomena, hitherto attributed to Bacteria, are directly due to a 
class of chemical ferments called enzymes.” These are not there¬ 
fore excluded from consideration in this book. In Part V para¬ 
sitic bacteria are considered and the species causing some of the 
common diseases are considered. It is an admirable book for 
students and for general readers. 

* 

The Polyporaceae of North America, XIII. The de¬ 
scribed species of Bjerkandera, Trametes, and Coriolus. William 
Alphonso Murrill. Bull. Torr. Bot. Club, 32:633-656. Dec. 1905. 
The treatment of our species is similar in plan to that followed in 
the author’s previous articles. New names are Bjerkandera fra- 
grans (for Polyporus fragrans Peck), Trametes unicolor (for 
P. unicolor Fr., and P. obtusus Berk,), Coriolus hirsutulus (for 


May 1906] Notes from Mycological Literature 


131 


Polyporus hirsutulus Schw.), C.pubescens (for P.pubescens Fr.), 
C. snbluteus (for P. subluteus ‘Eli. & Ev.), C. sartwellii (for 
P. sartwellii B. & C.), C. ilicincola (for P. ilicincola B. & C.), C. 
flabellum (for P. flabellum Mont.), C. planellus (for P. planellus 
Peck), C. sobrius (for P. sobrius B. & C.), C. nigromarginatus 
(for P. hirsutus Fr., Boletus nigromarginatus, Schw.), C. sulli- 
vantii (for P. sullivantii Mont.), C. sericeo-hirsutus (for P. seri- 
ceo-hirsutus Kl., Hexagona sericea Fr.), C. arenicolor (for P. 
arenicolor B. & C.), C. hirtellus (for Polystictus hirtellus Fr.), 
C. tener (for Polyporus tener Lev.). 

Fungi Utahensis, Fascicle one, collected and distributed 
by A. O. Garrett, [received in December 1904] consists of exsic- 
cata with reprints of the original description for each species 
accompanied by the following announcement: “It is the inten¬ 
tion to issue Fungi Utahensis in uniform sets of twenty-five 
specimens to the set, the fascicles to be distributed to subscribers 
as rapidly as material is acquired. An attempt will be made to 
have each fascicle contain specimens belonging to closely related 
groups. As will be seen from the accompanying list, all the 
numbers in this fascicle are representatives of the Uredineae. 
The plan pursued in the “make-up” of the sets will be similar 
to that of Professor Kellerman’s Ohio Fungi.” 

The First Part of the First Volume of the Biograph¬ 
ical Index of North American Fungi, by William G. Farlow, 
has been issued by the Carnegie Institution at Washington (1905), 
consisting of a preface (pp. I-IX), abbreviations of authors and 
publications cited (XI-XXIV), and the Index from Abrothallus 
to Badhamia (pp. 1-312). The author says it should be borne 
in mind that the Index does not purport to be a summary of all 
references to North American fungi, but it is limited to those 
which concern the systematic Mycologist, and does not include 
references to papers on fungicides and other technical and agri¬ 
cultural subjects as such, but cites them only when they also 
contain notes of interest to the systematists. The importance 
of the work is at once recognized and doubtless the remaining 
parts and volumes will soon appear. A sample will show the 
plan Dr. Farlow has adopted in carrying out his Index: 
Aecidium Apocyni, S. 

S. Syn. Car. 68 (42) no. 448. d. 1822. 

Bon. Abb. Nat. Ges. Halle 5:208 (42). 1860. 

M. A. Curtis, Bot. N. Car. 124. 1867. 

Burrill, Bull. Ill. Lab. 2:236. 1885 and Rept. Ill. Ind. Univ. 12:147. 

1885. 

Kellerm. & Carl. Tr. Kans. Acad. 10:91. 1887. 

De Toni in Sacc. Syll. 8 :808. d. 28 Oct. 1888. 

Webber, Bull. Nebr. Exp. Sta. 1:329 (59). 18 Dec. 1889. 

Gall. Bull. U. S. Agr. Veg. Pathol. 8:55. 1889. 

Webber, Rept. Nebr. Agr. 1889:209 (69). 1890. 

Williams, Bull. S. Dak. Exp. Sta. 29:49. Dec. 1891. 


132 


Journal oj Mycology 


[Vol. 1*2 


Cheney, Tr. Wis. Acad. 10:69 Oct. 1895. 

Tubeuf-Smith, Diseases of Plants, 411. 1897. 

Ell. & Ev. Fling. Columb. 1295 . May 1898. 

Barthol. Tr. Kans. Acad. 16:186. June 1899. 

Patterson, Bull U. S. Agr. PI. Industry 8:8. 3 Feb. 1902. 

Two fungi growing in holes made by wood-boring insects, 
by Perley Spaulding, occupies pp. 73-77, plates 25-27, 15th An¬ 
nual Report of the Missouri Botanical Garden. The species 
referred to are Flammula sapineus and Claudopus nidulans. 

John L. Sheldon makes a Report on Plant Diseases 
of West Virginia [Bulletin 96, Agr. Exp. Sta. June 30, 1905]; 
giving in popular language short account of several diseases, 
with a half dozen half-tone plates. 

From the Office of Experiment Stations, the U. S. 
Department of Agriculture issues as Farmers’ Institute Lecture 
No 2, A Syllabus of Illustrated Lecture on Potato Diseases and 
their treatment, authors F. C. Steward and IT. J. Eustace. The 
lecture is to be accompanied with 47 lantern views — marginal 
numbers on the page corresponding to the slides, the legends 
given in the Appendix. 

In an article in Science, N. S., Vol. XX, No. 497, pp. 
55-6, July 8, 1904, entitled Vitality of Pseudomonas campestris 
(Pam.) Smith on cabbage seed the writers say that they have 
found that P. campestris may live on dry cabbage seed for at least 
ten months. 

C. A. J. A. OuDEMANS CONTINUES HIS CONTRIBUTIONS a la 
Flore Mycoligique der Pays-bas (XX)-Overdr. Ned. Kr. Arch. 
3e Ser. II, 4. Supplement, pp. 1077-1132, and pi. XI-XIII. In¬ 
teresting new species are the following: Entyloma lini on 
Linum usitatissimum; Phyllosticta acoricola n. n. for Phoma 
acori Cooke; Rhabdospora phlogis on Phlox drummondi; Stil- 
bospora robiniae on Rabinia pseudacacia; Stigmella atriplicis 
on Atriplex hortense. 

Considering the wide distribution of the banana plant 
in tropical countries throughout the world, it is quite remark¬ 
able that it has so very few serious enemies in the form of in¬ 
sects and fungi says J. E. Higgins in Bulletin No. 7, Hawaii 
Agr. Exp. Station, Honolulu, 1904. Three fungi are given 
which prey upon this plant, 1st, Banana Anthracnose (Gloeo- 
sporium musarum Cke. & Massee) ; 2nd, Marasmius semiustus 
B. & C.; 3rd, Fusarium sp. 

Preliminary Diagnosis of New species of Laboulbeni- 
aceae, — VI, by Roland Thaxter, forms No. 11, Vol. XLI, 
Proceedings of the American Academy of Sciences, July 1905. 
“With the present contribution, which comprises such new forms 
of Laboulbeniaceae as have accumulated during the past two 


May 1906] Notes from Mycological Literature 


133 


years, the writer proposes to close the series of preliminary 
diagnoses which he has issued from time to time since 1899.” 
Dr. Thaxter has described about 500 species in all including 
about 48 genera. In this last paper about thirty new species are 
described. Nine of them are North American. 

Annales Mycologici for Feb. 1906 (Vol. IV, No. 1) has 
the following table of contents: Blakeslee, Albert Francis, Zygo¬ 
spore Germinations in the Mucorineae; Sydow, H. et P., Neue 
und kritische Uredineen — IV; Freeman, E. M., The Affinities 
of the Fungus of Lolium Temulentum, L.; Oertel, G., Eine neue 
Rhabdospora-Art; Elenkin, A. A., Species novae lichenum in 
Sibiria arctica a cl. A. A. Birula-Bialynizki collectae (expeditio 
baronis Tol) ; Krieger, W., Einige neue Pilze aus Sachsen; 
Heinze, Barthold, Sind Pilze im Stande, den elementaren Stick- 
stoflf der Luft zu verarbeiten und den Boden an Gesamtstick- 
stoff anzureichern ?; Rehm, Ascomycetes exs. Fasc. 36; Sac- 
cardo, P. A., Mycetes aliquot congoenses novi; Neue Literatur; 
Referate und kritische Besprechungen. 

H. et P. Sydow Neue und kritsche Uredineen — IV. in 
Annales Mycologici for Feb. 1906 (4:28-32) publish a dozen 
new species mostly from North America and the Philippines. 
The American species are Uromyces amoenus, U. amphidymus, 
U. fremonti, U. heterodermus, U. substriatus, Puccinia fuchsiae 
and P. aemulans. 

A report of the investigation done under grants as re¬ 
search assistant of the Carnegie Institution, by Albert Francis 
Blakeslee, is published in the Annales Mycologici, 4:1-28, Feb. 
1906. It consists of an exhaustive study of Zygospore Germi¬ 
nations in the Mucorineae. A lithographic plate accompanies 
the paper, illustrating Phycomyces nitens. 

E. M. Freeman read a paper before the Mycological 
Society at New Orleans on the Affinities of the Fungus of 
Lolium temulentum L., whibh is published in Annales Mycol¬ 
ogici, 4:32-4, Feb. 1906. In this lie refers to the discovery in 
1895-6 by Frank Maddox of Tasmania that in loose smut of 
wheat an infection of the grains could be produced by placing 
spores on the ovary at flowering time. The grains so infected 
were apparently normal, but from them smutted plants were pro¬ 
duced in the following year. Brefeld, and also Hecke, in 1903-4, 
rediscovered the same method of infection in case of loose smut 
of wheat and of barley smut. The author has previously pointed 
out the strong probability that the fungus of Lolium temulentum 
was a smut. Now he suggests that the recent discoveries of the 
infection method as stated above strengthen considerably the 
theory of its smut origin. 


134 


Journal of Mycology 


[Vol. 12 


Lichens—Stereocaulon, Pilophorus and Thamnolia, by 
Carolyn W. Harris, The Bryologist, 7:71-3, Sept. 1904, is a 
popular article with four illustrations in the text. Seven or eight 
species receive notice. 

Bulletin 137, Ontario Agricultural College, is devoted 
to a Bacterial Disease of Cauliflower and Allied Plants, author 
F. C. Harrison. A brief introduction is followed by a consid¬ 
eration of the subject under the heads of Pathenogenesis, Patho¬ 
logical History, and Inoculation experiments. 

A short article, with ten beautiful half-tone plates, on 
Abberant veil Remnants in some edible Agarics, by William Tre- 
lease, was published in the 15th Annual Report of the Missouri 
Botanical Garden. The species represented are Lepiota nauci- 
nus, Agaricus amygdalinus and Hypholoma appendiculatum. 

Under the head of Tobacco Diseases and Tobacco 
Breeding, the Ohio Agricultural Experiment Station issued Bul¬ 
letin 156, November 1904, by A. D. Selby. In the section giving 
account of diseases due to parasitic fungi and Bacteria we find 
the following listed: Root rot (Black Rot) [Thielavia basicola 
Zopf]; Bed Rot [Rhizoctonia] ; Decay of Tobacco Seedlings [Al- 
ternaria-A. tenuis?]; the Granville Tobacco Wilt; Leaf Blight 
(Frog-eye) [Cercospora nicotiana E. & E.]; White speck and 
Brown spot [Macrosporium tabacinum E. & E., and M. longipes 
E. & E.] ; Downy and Powdery Mildew. 

An interesting lecture, largely historical, on the Study of 
Parasitic fungi in the United States, by G. P. Clinton, before 
the Massachusetts Horticultural Society, is printed in the Tran¬ 
sactions, 1904, Part I, pp. 91-106. 

O. Appel und R. Laubert: Die Konidienform des Kar- 
tofflepilzes Phellomyces sclerotiophorus Frank. Berichte der 
Deutschen Botanischen Gesellschaft, 1905 [23:218-220]. The 
authors succeeded in inducing the stromata of this fungus of 
which hitherto “neither in nature nor by culture, has any typical 
fungal fructification been observed,” to develop and they ob¬ 
tained a form identical with Spondycladium atrovirens Harz. 
“Aus den in gekiirzter Form hier vorlaufig mitgeteilten Unter- 
suchungen geht hervor, dass der Pilz, der von Frank als Phello¬ 
myces sclerotiophorus beschrieben und als Krankheitserreger in 
die phytopathologische Literatur eingefuhrt worden ist, nur ein 
noch steriler Entwicklungszustand des Sponlycladium atrovirens 
Harz ist und dass infolgedessen der “interimistische Name 
Phellomyces sclerotiophorus Frank” zu streichen und durch 
“Spondycladium atrovirens Harz” zu ersetzen ist.” 

The Agricultural Experiment Station issued a Bulletin, 
No. 64, (1904) on the Apple Scab in Western Washington by W. 


May 1906] Notes from Mycological Literature 


135 


H. Lawrence, of which this is his summary: Apple scab is 
abundant and destructive in Western Washington. The apple 
scab fungus has two stages — a summer, or parasitic stage [Fu- 
sicladium dendriticum], and a winter, or saprophytic stage \Fen- 
turia acqualis). The summer stage infests the leaves, flowers and 
fruit; the winter stag'e lives in the dead leaves of the apple which 
fall off in autumn. The winter stage produces the spores that 
cause the infection of the flowers, leaves and fruit in spring. 
To destroy the fungus, destroy the fallen leaves in the fall or 
winter. To prevent the fungus attacking the apple in spring, 
spray with a properly prepared Bordeaux mixture. 

On a Fungus Disease o-f Euonymus japonicus Linn. f. 
by Ernest S. Salmon is reprinted from the Journal of the Royal 
Horticultural Society, Vol. XXIX, Part 4. The parasite in 
question is Oidium euonymi-japonicae (Arc.) Sacc. A half-tone 
illustration of affected leaves is given, also outline figures of 
conidia, appressoria and haustoria. It is stated that a pecu¬ 
liarity of this Mildew is the capacity it possesses of persisting 
by means of hibernation of its mycelium. As to its introduction 
the author says: It seems, then, more probable that the fungus 
may have been lately brought to Europe on diseased plants im¬ 
ported from Japan than that a European species of Oidium has 
of late years spread from its original host and attacked E. japo¬ 
nicus as a new host-plant. On the former theory we find an ex¬ 
planation of the fact mentioned above, viz. the epidemic charac¬ 
ter of the disease now beginning to be shown by the Oidium in 
Europe, since it is an established fact that a parasitic fungus 
on reaching a new country attacks its host-plant with exceptional 
virulence for several years after its arrival. 

New or rare Pyrenomyceteae from Western New York, 
by Charles E. Fairman, Proc. Rochester Acad. Sci. 4:215-224, 
March 1906, containing Nos. 355-380, is supplementary to his 
list of Pyrenomyceteae of Orleans County, N. Y., printed in the 
same volume. Nos. 355-364 are new species by Fairman; Nos. 
365-6 are new species by Rehm; notes and supplementary de¬ 
scriptions are given for Nos. 367-380. One full page illustra¬ 
tion is devoted to Sporormia leguminosa Fairman n. sp. and one 
to Amphisphaeria aeruginosa Fairman n. sp., Sporidia and other 
parts of several of the new species occupy another plate. 

Charles Horton Peck, New species of Fungi, Bull. Torr. 
Bot. Club, 33:213-221, Apr. 1906, describes 22 species of the 
higher Fungi, mostly belonging to the following genera; Lepiota, 
Hygrophorus, Collybia, Russula, Lentinus, Annularia, Inocybe, 
Flammula, Psathyrella, Hydnum, Craterellus, Monilia, Marsoma, 
Haplosporefla, Sarcoscypha, Poronia, Leptosphaeria, and Pleo- 
spora. 






Journal of Mtcologt 

A Periodical Devoted to North American Mycology. Issued Bi¬ 
monthly; January, March, May, July, September and November. 
Price, $2.00 per Year. To Foreign Subscribers, $2.25. Edited and 

Published by ^ ^ KELLERMAN, PH. D., COLUMBUS, OHIO. 


EDITOR'S NOTES. 

There seems to be a difference of opinion, at least a differ¬ 
ence in practice, in regard to the proper mode of giving the 
date in a citation from a periodical publication — and therefore 
the editor is provoked to make a comment. 

First, let the question be raised, as to where in the periodical 
the actual date of issue should be printed. Only one answer can, 
it seems to us, be given, namely, at the bottom of the last page. 
Most of the periodicals follow 7 this plan; a few however give 
this date in the subsequent No., Part or Heft, a plan that is very 
objectionable. It precludes citing anything in the No. until the 
next No. appears; it adds to the labor of making a citation or 
of getting the exact date since it always requires consulting two 
Nos. instead of one. 


If a periodical repeats on the first page of each of the issues 
its name, date, etc., that date (even if only the month and year) 
should appear in making the citation instead of the actual date 
of the issue which might be found on the last page or on the 
cover. Thus if Saceardo’s article in the Feb. (1906) No. of 
Annales be cited, the date ought to be as here given, and not 
"'5 April 1906”, which was the actual date of issue. Citation 
is primarily for place to direct the reader. If one were referred 
.to “5 April 1906” for the article he would hardly search for a 
Feb. No. — but rather for an “April No/’ (It might be desir¬ 
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also the actual date of issue.) If, however, the citation, for ex¬ 
ample pertain to the article in Hedwigia, Band XLV., Heft 3, 
by Magnus, it would necessarily be as to date, “28 Mar. 1906.” 
(No date other than that of the actual date of issue is printed.) 
This is given only on the cover — of course given at the end 
of the year or close of the volume in connection with the title- 
page, etc. 


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Volume 12 , No. 84 July 1906 


Journal of Mycology 


TABLE OF CONTENTS 


Kellerman — Mycological Expedition to Guatemala. 137 

Charles — Lasiodiplodia on Theobroma Cacao and Mangifera Indica 145 
Hedgcock and Spaulding — New Method of Mounting Fungi Grown 

in Cultures for the Herbarium. 147 

CJ Peck — A New Species of Galera. 148 

, >3 Arthur —Reasons for Desiring a Better Classification of the Ured- 

inales. 149 

Morgan — North American Species of Lepiota. 154 

Morgan — Descriptive Synopsis of Morgan’s North American Species 

of Marasmius. 159 

Garrett — Field Notes on the Uredinese. 162 

Kellerman — Notes from Mycological Literature, XX. 164 

Editor’s Notes. 176 


W. A. Kellerman , Ph.D. 

Profeisor of Botany, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 


Entered as Second Class Matter, Postoffice at Columbus, Ohio. 


PRESS OF F. J. HEER, COLUMBUS. OHIO. 



















Cost of Separates. 


Contributors who desire separates of their articles will 
receive the same at cost, approximately as follows: 

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address: editor journal of mycology 






Journal of Mycology Portraits with Facsimile Autographs. 







Journal of Mycology 

VOLUME 12 - JULY 1906 


TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Kellerman — Mycological Expedition to Guatemala. 137 

Charles — Lasiodiplodia on Theobroma Cacao and Mangifera Iudica 145 
Hedgcock and Spaulding — New Method of Mounting Fungi Grown 

in Cultures for the Herbarium. 147 

Peck — A New Species of Galera. 148 

Arthur — Reasons for Desiring a Better Classification of the Ured- 

inales. 149 

Morgan — North American Species of Lepiota. 154 

Morgan — Descriptive Synopsis of Morgan’s North American Species 

of Marasmius. 159 

Garrett — Field Notes on the Uredinese. 162 

Kellerman — Notes from Mycological Literature, XX. 164 

Editor’s Notes . 176 


MYCOLOGICAL EXPEDITION TO GUATEMALA.* 

W. A. KELLERMAN. 

During the winter months of January, February and March, 
1905, a botanical trip was made to Guatemala, Central America, 
for the purpose of collecting parasitic fungi. A trip for like 
purpose was again made in the corresponding months of 1906. 
A large amount of material was collected for study, the results 
of which may appear from time to time in future Nos. of the 
Journal. The itinerary only will be given in this article, with 
some account of the general botanical character of the regions 
visited. Later, notes will be published on the fungi, and some 
of the more interesting, as well as rare or new species, will be 
illustrated by a distribution of selected exsiccata. 

GENERAL TOPOGRAPHY. 

Guatemala is situated between 13.8 and 17.8 degrees north 
latitude, and 88.3 and 92.2 degrees longitude west of Green¬ 
wich. It embraces an area of 60,000 square miles, being bounded 
on the north by Mexico, Yucatan and Belize (or British Hon¬ 
duras) ; on the East by Belize, Bay of Honduras and Spanish 
Honduras; on the South by Honduras, San Salvador and the 
Pacific Ocean; and on the West by the Pacific Ocean and Mex- 


* Contributions to Guatemalan Mycology. I. 















138 


Journal of Mycology 


[Vol. 12 


ico. The entire country is of volcanic origin, a large portion 
being mountainous. The Cordilleras, considered a continuation 
and connecting range of the Rocky Mountains and of the Andes, 
traverse the region in a northwesterly and southeasterly direc¬ 
tion, the crest being 50 miles from the Pacific Ocean. The alti¬ 
tude is about 8,000 feet in the West or Northwest to about 5,000 
or 4,000 at the Southern boundary line of the Republic. The 
numerous volcanoes are of course much higher, reaching in many 
cases an altitude of 11,000 to 12,000 feet. From this range of 
the Cordilleras there is a very considerable extension of the 
mountain chain eastward to the Bay of Honduras; the height is 
about 3,000 feet, but considerably less as it approaches the east¬ 
ern coast of the country. Here it is conspicuous by reason of a 
comparatively lofty peak (called San Gil), probably an extinct 
volcano (but as yet unexplored) that rises to a height of at least 
1,500 feet. The chain just mentioned is called the Sierra de las 
Minas; the extreme eastern portion however is called Sierra del 
Mico. The portion of the country bordering on Honduras is 
also mountainous, but no considerable altitude is anywhere at¬ 
tained ; several extinct small volcanoes occur here. 

The land near the coast is low — the low area on the Pacific 
side being rather narrow, then gradually ascending so that at 
a distance of 30 or 40 miles the altitude is 1,000 feet. From that 
line the slope is very steep to the general crest of the Cordilleras. 
On the Atlantic side the low land is much more extensive. A 
great tropical swamp lies back to Puerto Barrios. An altitude of 
500 feet would not be reached up the valley of the Motagua, or 
Rio Grande, short of 1000 miles from the coast. Following 
westward from the mouth of the Rio Dulce an altitude of 500 
feet would be attained when Lake Izabal was passed — and a 
point reached perhaps 80 miles from the Bay of Honduras. 
Then the country (in the Department of Alta Verapaz) becomes 
mountainous. An exceedingly interesting topographical region 
is the extreme northern section, this Department being called 
El Peten. It is not mountainous; it has the general character 
of Yucatan. But there are great rivers and many lakes in Peten. 
The country has not been thoroughly traversed by explorers and 
is practically a terra incognita. The itinerary neither year in¬ 
cluded this enticing region though it is hoped that in the near 
future its mycological flora may be subjected to some scrutiny. 
Before passing in review the particular places visited, and sketch T 
ing their general features in order to elucidate to some extent 
the character and distribution of the fungi that subsequent notes 
may disclose, a few words on the climatology and hydrography 
will be given — these being supreme factors determining the 
character and distribution of the vegetation. 


July 1906] Mycological Expedition to Guatemala 


139 


CLIMATE. 

While it is a tropical climate the varying altitudes afford 
considerable variation in temperature — this being more pro¬ 
nounced than the variation from season to season (Winter to 
Summer) in any given locality. As to the latter, it may be said 
that the Winter temperature is but slightly below that of the 
Summer months — perhaps io or 12 degrees. The daily range 
is not great — the nights however being quite cool — invariably 
10 (or even 20) degrees or more below that of noonday. Near 
the coast the temperature is often about 90 degrees Fahrenheit. 
At an altitude of 5,000 feet 70 to 80 degrees may be considered 
a fair estimate for midday temperatures. At 8,000 feet, the 
highest point for which records are available, Quezaltenango, the 
temperature is much lower. The monthly extremes as recorded 
by Rev. W. E. McBath, of that city, are given below. A self 
recording instrument was used and the readings for the year 
1905 were as follows, — the highest and lowest record for morn¬ 
ing and for evening being shown: 


January, A. M., 

26 and 

49; 

P. M., 

55 

and 

7o° 

F, 

February, 

30 

66 

49; 

(c 

61 

tt 

73° 

tt 

March, 

29 

66 

54; 

tt 

70 

tt 

79° 

tt 

April, 

41 

66 

56; 

a 

70 

tt 

8o° 

tt 

May, 

45 

66 

57; 

tt 

70 

tt 

78° 

tt 

June, 

47 

66 

56; 

tt 

65 

tt 

77° 

tt 

July, 

42 

66 

55; 

tt 

62 

tt 

74° 

te 

August, 

42 

66 

55; 

tt 

65 

tt 

75° 

tt 

September, “ 

43 

66 

55; 

tt 

63 

tt 

75° 

tt 

October, 

38 

66 

56; 

tt 

62 

tt 

73° 

tt 

November, “ 

38 

66 

54; 

tt 

66 

tt 

72 0 

tt 

December, 

29 

66 

49; 

tt 

63 

tt 

69° 

tt 


While no records can be given for the very high volcanoes, 
it can be stated that no freezing temperatures were exprienced 
though the cold seemed very severe. No snow was seen during 
the winters of 1905 and ’6. There is no snow line in the Republic 
of Guatemala, but the inhabitants state that at rare times snow is 
seen on the highest mountains. 

HYDROGRAPHY. 

Throughout the country there is an alternation of a rainy 
and a dry season. Abundant precipitation usually begins in May 
and ceases in October; the months between October and May 
constitute the dry season at which time no rains fall except in the 
low country near the coast and in the Department of Alta Vera- 
paz. In the latter regions rains are common throughout the year 
but the precipitation is comparatively slight during the so-called 


140 


Journal of Mycology 


[Vol. 12 


dry season. Clouds are formed continuously in the highest 
mountain regions and especially about the cones of the vol¬ 
canoes, but the rainfall does not seem to be excessive at these alti¬ 
tudes. There is an arid region supporting a purely xerophytic 
vegetation, in the central portion of the country, beginning at 
Gualan, 80 miles from Puerto Barrios, in the valley of the 
Motagua, extending to El Rancho 130 miles from the Port just 
named; thence westward and northwestward through Salama, 
in the Department of Baja Verapaz. Tree Cacti of the Cereus 
Opuntia and Peireskia types, and spinous Leguminosae are the 
characteristic forms. The grass and other vegetation seems to 
be absolutely dead during the dry season yet when the rains be¬ 
gin in the Spring everything becomes suddenly and intensely 
green, as if by magic. Here however the rainfall is less than in 
any other part of the Republic. This sharply marked seasonal 
change from extreme wet to extreme dry — each of the two 
seasons about the same length — accounts for the pronounced 
xerophytic aspect of the vegetation. The low-lying countries and 
the high peaks or crests of the mountains have however the usual 
character of moist tropical countries. Two of the mountain lakes 
are of considerable size; the largest Lake Atitlan, in the Depart¬ 
ment of Solola, is about 8 or 10 miles in length and nearly as 
broad; it has a depth of 1,000 feet; there is no known outlet. 

Lake Amatitlan, situated in the Department of Amatitlan, 
is about 7 or 8 miles long but only one to 3 miles wide; it is 75 
to 100 feet deep, and is drained by the Rio Michatoya. The shore 
vegetation and that of the mountains forming the steep-sloping 
walls is strongly xerophytic in character. Some of the craters 
of the numerous extinct volcanoes are occupied by little lakes. 
Only two very large rivers, but with rather narrow valleys, 
drain the eastern side of the Republic — these being the Rio 
Grande, but usually called the Motagua, south of the Sierra de 
las Minas, and the Rio Dulce, called the Polochic above Lake 
Izabal, north of this mountain range. The Chixoy, further north 
called the Usumacinta, in the central part of the country, flows 
northward into Mexico. The rivers on the Pacific side are very 
numerous and need not be individually mentioned. For a cor¬ 
rect account of the climate, rainfall, lakes and rivers of the De¬ 
partment of El Peten no sufficient data are at hand — besides, 
no mycological collections have as yet been made in that region. 

PUERTO BARRIOS AND LIVINGSTON. 

The places first visited for the purpose of making mycologi¬ 
cal collections in 1905 and 1906 were Puerto Barrios and Liv¬ 
ingston on the Atlantic coast, that is to say on the Honduras Bay. 
Immediately back of the low mangrove-skirted coast at Puerto 
Barrios lies an extensive tropical swamp, covered by impene- 


141 


July 1906] Mycological Expedition to Guatemala 

trable vegetation of ferns, palms, lianes and large trees. The 
Northern Railroad running southward for a distance from the 
coast, has opened up a line through this interesting tract and 
collecting is thus abundantly facilitated. This rich tropical vege¬ 
tation however did not furnish as many parasitic fungi as some 
other districts, though a fair amount of saprophytic species were 
noticed. The situation of Livingston, 12 miles north of Puerto 
Barrios, at the mouth of Rio Dulce, is wholly unlike the latter. 
The town is built on a rocky bluff 50 to 60 feet high fringed with 
shrubs and trees — the Cocoanut-palm everywhere planted in the 
low country being a conspicuous feature of the landscape. A 
small area outside of the town has been cleared — which affords 
opportunity for “weeds” — native and introduced — and thus a 
marked variation is noticeable from the dense jungle of tree- 
ferns, palms, hosts of Melastomaceac, climbing Panicums and 
numerous other interesting forms most of which are hosts to 
parasitic fungi. 

TENADORES AND LOS AMATES. 

At the point where the railroad touches the Rio Motagua 
the little village of Tenadores is situated in the midst of extensive 
Banana fields. Small clearings around have been made. The 
river is fringed with great areas of tall canes and grasses. The 
great Monaca Palm is everywhere conspicuous as also is the 
Ceiba [pron. say-ee-bah] the latter in many cases being of enor¬ 
mous size. A somewhat better mycological field for the collector 
is offered at Los Amates, a town on the Rio Motagua about 60 
miles from the Port. The altitude is 160 feet; the river valley 
is wide and covered with a varied growth of plants. Northward 
a few miles the low mountain range of Sierra del Mico is en¬ 
countered. Somewhat varied edaphic conditions are afforded 
and the region is a very rich one for the collector. A short dis¬ 
tance above the town are some extensive pampas regions and 
further up the river are denuded forest areas formerly covered 
with Pines (Pinus caribaea) now turned into lumber and ex¬ 
ported. 

GUALAN AND ZACAPA. 

On the Rio Motagua 80 miles from the Port (Barrios) is 
situated the Indian city of Gualan at which point the central semi- 
arid or desert region begins. Cactus trees of the Cereus, Opuntia 
and Peireskia types occur, but not in great abundance. Numerous 
other xerophytic plans occur in this region, which therefore is 
extremely interesting and rich in parasitic fungi. It is just be¬ 
yond the very moist low country. The altitude is 420 feet. The 
valley proper varies from one mile to three or four times that 
width. The Sierra de las Minas range lies immediately to the 
north and hills or low mountains flank the southern side. At 
present this is the end of the first division of the Northern Rail- 


142 


Journal of Mycology 


[Vol. 12 


road (Ferro-carril del Norte), and the location of the shops and 
offices — all of which however are to be moved immediately to 
Zacapa a town 20 miles farther up the river situated in the 
wider valley of the Zacapa River, a branch of the Motagua. 
Before passing, it is a pleasure to acknowledg the kindly assist¬ 
ance in our work afforded by Mr. G. F. Williamson the Manager 
of the Railroad. In his absence his first assistant Mr. Fox was 
equally polite and obliging to us. At Zacapa the vegetation has 
a more pronounced xerophytic type — the tree Cacti are more 
numerous, and the great wastes of Acacia and Mimosa bushes 
are impressive. Grasses are very numerous — in wet places tall 
forms occur, but over the dry areas short-stemmed species form 
a sparse layer, yet almost dense enough to be called sod. The 
mountains become gradually higher more sharply limiting the 
narrowing valley till El Rancho is reached. 

EL RANCHO. 

This place for years the terminus of the Northern Railroad, 
130 miles from Puerto Barrios and almost half-way across the 
continent in an E. N. E. and W. S. W. line, is an interesting 
region to the traveler as well as to the botanist. The Sierra de 
las Minas immediately to the north lifts its peaks into the clouds, 
attaining an altitude of about 3,000 feet. The mountains to the 
south of the narrow valley are of insignificant height. The 
great river Motagua even at this dry winter season demands care 
from those who ford its waters. But the chief charm is in the 
peculiar vegetation — the numerous Peireskiae (Cacti) With 
leaves still attached or wholly discarded, in all cases loaded with 
the pomiform fruits suggesting at a short distance a real apple 
orchard; the giant Cereus trees and the equally abundant and 
striking Opuntias and their near relatives; the Ficus trees; the 
common Bastard Mahogany, the real Mahogany, the hosts of 
leguminosae and other thorny trees, — and yet other xerophytic 
forms too numerous to mention suggests the field afforded the 
exploring mycologist, making the sojourn at once a place ex¬ 
tremely interesting and equally profitable. This semi-desert 
region extends still farther up the Motagua and again north west¬ 
ward to Salama into regions to be explored on a future trip. 
From this place our route took a west southwesterly course pass¬ 
ing through Sanarate, an important town of considerable altitude, 
across the rugged San Antonio Mountain by a rocky trail, by 
way of Agua Caliente, to the city of Guatemala. 

GUATEMALA CITY. 

At an altitude of about 5,000 feet the city of Guatamala is 
situated on a mesa surrounded by deep barrancas beyond which 
are mountains whose summits are 500 to 1,000 feet above the 


July 1606 ] Mycological Expedition to Guatemala 143 

plateau. It is a beautiful site but no detailed account of the 
vegetation of the region need be given. That of the higher 
mountains is somewhat peculiar. Forests of pines are not un¬ 
common. Intermediate between these but at very high altitudes 
the oaks are very numerous. The Compositae, the herbaceous, 
the half-shrubby, the fruiticose and arborescent forms, are abund¬ 
ant here as throughout the Republic. Labiatae are perhaps more 
abundant than in the very low country. The Leguminosae are 
conspicuous by their abundance and in this respect rival the 
Compositae. The arboreous species are common. Rusts were 
everywhere in evidence, and in fact the parasitic species of all 
groups of fungi were numerously represented. In the rainy 
season the saprophytic forms could doubtless be collected in 
great abundance. 

PACIFIC COAST REGION. 

The Central Railroad leads by a serpentine route 74 miles 
from Guatemala City to San Jose, a Pacific port 40 or 50 miles 
distant, the descent in this short distance being about 5,000 feet. 
Through the thoughtful courtesy of Mr. D. B. Hodgson, (Gen. 
Mgr.), and Mr. W. B. Tisdal, (Asst. Mgr.), facilities were kind¬ 
ly offered for transportation, including scientific paraphernalia, 
along this line and their yet more interesting western branch that 
parallels the coast at a distance of about 40 miles — this being a 
finished portion of the Pan-American Railway — traversing an 
exceedingly rich country at the foot of the Cordilleras, ending at 
present at the large city of Mazatenango. Still another Company 
operates a Railroad from the latter city to Ratalhuleu, thence 
southwrd to the Pacific Port of Champerico and northward to 
San Felipe. This whole region is extremely warm; the vegeta¬ 
tion is dense and tropical, but very much extended areas have 
been cleared and now furnish splendid fields for sugar cane. 
Lagoons border the coast which is fringed as in all tropical 
regions with the Mangrove. The whole country is a paradise 
for the botanist, and fungi are everywhere plentiful enough. 
Large collections for future study were made at Escuintla, Santa 
Lucia, Patalul and Mazatenango. From this region two trips 
were made northward to the crest of the Cordilleras to several 
interesting points as follows. 

QUEZALTENANGO. 

From San Felipe in the northern part of the Department of 
Retalhuleu, altitude 1,050 feet, a trip was made mule-back, be¬ 
tween 20 and 30 miles to Quezaltenango in the Department of 
like name, altitude 8,000 feet. For a large part of the way the 
vegetation was tropical and the region was enchanting. Splen¬ 
did coffee planatations were passed, and higher up vegetation, 
characteristic of mountainous regions, was encountered. Abund- 


144 


Journal of Mycology 


[Vol. 12 


ant collections were made. The trip to Lake Atitlan was made 
from Patalul which proved to be a charming repetition in the 
main of the route before described to Quezaltenango. This may 
be described in connection with another considerable mountain- 
lake, namely Amatitlan. 

LAKES ATITLAN AND AMATITLAN. 

Besides the great Lake Izabal near the east coast in De¬ 
partment of same name and Lake San Andre or Peten in the 
middle of the Department of El Peten — neither included in the 
itinerary of 1905 and 1906 — the only other very large bodies 
of water in the interior of Guatemala are the mountain lakes of 
Amatitlan, in the Department of same name, and Atitlan, in 
the Department of Solala. These lakes are 7 or 8 miles in 
length; Atitlan is 6 or 7 miles wide, but Amatitlan has a width 
of only one mile near the middle and about 3 miles exclusive of 
this narrow neck. They are alike in having for the most part 
walls of rather steep sloping mountains — yet the flat area on 
the north side of Amatitlan is very great — being the debris of 
ages brought down by the drainage from the north, finding its 
way into this mountain-hemmed basin mainly through the river 
emptying in the Lake at the middle and now greatly narrowed 
part. There is no visible outlet to Lake Atitlan; Rio Michatoya 
drains Lake Amatitlan Pacific-ward. This lake is only about 
one hundred feet deep, but some parts of Lake Atitlan are over 
1,000 feet in depth. Much time was spent on Lake Amatitlan 
to which then the following more particularly applies. The 
marked xerophytic character of the shore vegetation, as well as 
that of the slopes, was striking. Cacti were rather abundant; 
Acaciae and Mimosae were common; the Agaves were not rare; 
and hosts of Compositae , Leguminosae, Labiatae, etc., were 
present. One species of fleshy Asclepias grew on the shore; 
some species of Ficus were common; a giant Equisetum was en¬ 
countered ; groves of Salix humboldtiana were conspicuous; and 
epiphytic orchids, cacti, and bromeliads abounded. The para¬ 
sitic fungi in due quantity were at hand and later reports will 
show that many species were here collected. 

THE VOLCANOES AGUA, ATITLAN AND SANTA MARIA. 

Collections were made on three of the very high volcanoes, 
namely Agua, Atitlan and Santa Maria, also on Cerro Quemado 
and the lower part of Acatenango. The altitudes of the first 
three are 12,300, 11,500 and 11,360 feet respectively. Agua, situ¬ 
ated in the Department Sacatepequez, is clothed with vege¬ 
tation to the very apex and on the interior of the rather small 
crater — coarse grasses, some shrubs and a few stunted trees. 
A heavy belt of timber encircles the cone reaching a line within 


July 1006] Lasiodiplodia on Theobroma Cacao , Etc: 


145 


perhaps 2,000 feet of the apex. Toward the base it has been 
denuded of the original vegetation and converted into farms. 
Clouds and mists keep the upper portion bathed in moisture and 
the vegetation is very luxuriant except near the top. The entire 
area of its flanks furnishes excellent opportunity for the bo¬ 
tanical collector. The volcano Atitlan is in the Department of 
Solala immediately south of Lake Atitlan, and in general ap¬ 
pearance is much like Agua. It is not however clothed with 
vegetation to the extreme apex — the volcanic ash preventing 
plants from getting a foothold there. The forest covering which 
is very dense, beginning immediately below the line of loose 
material, has not been disturbed except very near the base. The 
volcano Santa Maria in the Department of Quezaltenango is 
likewise clothed with forest vegetation, which reaches the sum¬ 
mit. The eruption that took place in 1902 completely destroyed 
the vegetation on the south and southwest side where a new 
crater of immense size was formed. Many parasitic fungi were 
obtained on these volcanoes, especially on the first named in the 
list, yet the collections must be materially augmented bp future 
trips before a just estimate can be made as to abundance, distri¬ 
bution and character. 


ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS. 

By no means so much could have been accomplished with¬ 
out the cordial assistance and encouragement of many residents 
and citizens of that Republic. First of all thanks are due the 
officers of the Northern Railroad (Ferro-carril del Norte), and 
of the Central Railroad (Ferro-carril Central de Guatemala), 
for courtesies, previously mentioned in this article. The Ameri¬ 
can Minister Plenipotentiary Mr. Combs, the Consul General 
Mr. Winslow, the Vice Consul Mr. Owen, and Rev. W. B. 
Allison a resident missionary, also assisted by kindly advice; 
the pleasures of the trip were greatly enhanced by the courteous 
and cordial reception by their families. It is a pleasure also to 
acknowledge the uniform courtesy of the officers of the Republic, 
and their interest in our explorations, which is at the same time 
a reflection of the liberal and advanced policy, and deep interest 
in scientific and industrial advancement, on the part of the Presi¬ 
dent of Guatemala, Manuel Estrada Cabrera. 


OCCURRENCE OF LASIODIPLODIA ON THEOBROMA 
CACAO AND MANGIFERA INDICA. 

VERA K. CHARLES. 

In the spring of the present year a consignment of diseased 
Theobroma material, which included wood and fruit was sent 



146 


Journal of Mycology 


[Vol. 12 


to the Department of Agriculture from Brazil for examination 
as to the cause of the disease. Unfortunately, no written de¬ 
scription accompanied the specimens and as they were in alcohol 
there was no opportunity to trace the development of the disease 
to determine whether the disease on the pods was the same as 
that which produced the general abnormal branching of the 
twigs. Colletotrichum was definitely determined as present on 
the pods, but it was not in sufficient quantity to be the sole cause 
of the trouble. We inferred this only from the material which 
we had for examination, but of course it is possible that our 
limited amount of material was not typical of the disease in its 
natural place of occurrence. The beans were one mass of brown, 
many septate, knotted mycelia. As these beans were also in a 
preservative fluid no cultures could be started which would lead 
to the identification of this sterile mycelium. A second consign¬ 
ment of specimens of diseased Theobroma cacao consisting of 
pods and wood was received in August of this year from San 
Domingo. These pods showed the presence in great quantity 
of mycelium, similar to that just described, but in this case the 
fungus was fruiting and definitely identified as belonging to the 
genus Lasiodiplodia. 

About three months ago two specimens of the fruit of Man- 
gifera indica were sent to this Office by one of our plant intro¬ 
ducers, who procured them from a local fruit stand, which had 
probably received them from Florida. Although badly rotted 
the fungus was isolated and proved to be Lasiodiplodia. Sev¬ 
eral transfers were made but all cultures, even the first, were 
remarkably pure. 

The question whether this fungus is Lasiodiplodia tubericola 
E. & E. and not a new species, is yet to be determined. To all 
present appearances it is the same, but a series of inoculation 
experiments are in progress to determine if this may be a physio¬ 
logical species. Although the effect produced on these two hosts 
is not that of putrefaction, which is characteristic of this species, 
we are inclined to believe that the length of time which elapsed 
before the materal received our attention and the unusual con¬ 
dition to which it was subjected during that time, may be re¬ 
sponsible for the somewhat softened condition of the fruits. 

That this fungus may be connected with the Witches’ Broom 
disease or “putrefaction” disease, as called by cacao planters, we 
cannot say until we complete our cultural experiments, and have 
more material for our examination together with field observa¬ 
tions. 

Bureau of Plant Industry, 

U. S. Department of Agriculture. 


July 1906] A New Method of Mounting Fungi, Etc. 


147 


A NEW METHOD OF MOUNTING FUNGI GROWN IN 
CULTURES FOR THE HERBARIUM.* 

GEO. G. HEDGCOCK AND PERLEY SPAULDING. 

The writers had occasion recently to mount specimens of 
some of the smaller fungi which are easily grown on artificial 
media for the purpose of preserving them for herbarium speci¬ 
mens. This so far as known has never been attempted and no such 
specimens have ever been seen which were satisfactorily put up 
for such purposes. All available methods which have been tried 
were so far as known considered, but none of them seemed to 
present a good solution of the difficulty. It was accordingly 
attempted to invent some method which would be easily and 
cheaply used on as extensive a scale as might be wanted by any 
one issuing sets of exsiccati, or wishing to have the imperfect 
fungi represented in an herbarium by pure cultures. It is be¬ 
lieved that such a method has been discovered which is not only 
very satisfactory but is also cheap and easily used on any scale 
that it may be wished to prepare these fungi. 

The fungi are separated and grown in pure cultures in Petri 
dishes upon a rather stiff agar agar made with some infusion 
suitable for the normal growth of the fungi. At the proper stage 
in their growth the plates are divided into square blocks of agar 
of a suitable size. Each of these blocks is placed right side up 
upon a stiff cardboard and allowed to dry down. The card¬ 
boards may be of almost any description, but it has been found 
that a good quality of index cards is most convenient for the 
purpose. 

After the agar has become dry the mount is protected by 
pasting over the agar block a small, square or circular piece of 
cardboard which has been perforated with a gun-wad cutter, the 
perforation being of a size necessary to include the mounted block. 
These squares or circles of cardboard may be made of board of 
several thicknesses, varying from one to several millimeters, so 
that in selecting a protector the thickness may be adapted to the 
height of the filaments in the fungus. 

This method of mounting has proven very convenient with 
specimens of Stilbum, Graphium, Ceratostomella, Hormodendron 
and other similar fungi; it is best, however, to poison the speci¬ 
men after mounting, by spraying it with a strychnine solution. 

Mississippi Valley Laboratory, 

July 30 , 1906 . 


♦Published by permission of the Secretary of Agriculture. 



143 


Journal of Mycology 


[Vol. 12 


Q A NEW SPECIES OF GALERA. 

CHARLES H. PECK. 

A species of this genus apparently undescribed has been 
brought to my notice recently of which the following account 
may be given. 

Galera kellermani Peck sp. nov. — Pileus very thin, sub- 
ovate or subconic, soon becoming plane or nearly so, striatulate 
nearly to the center when moist, more or less wavy and persis¬ 
tently striate on the margin when dry, minutely granulose or 
mealy when young, unpolished when mature, often with a few 
scattered floccose squamules when young, and sometimes with 
a few slight fragments of a veil adhering to the margin which 
appears as if finely notched by the projecting ends of the gills, 
watery brown when moist, grayish brown when dry, a little 
darker in the center, taste slight, odor faint, like that of decay¬ 
ing wood; lamellae thin, close, adnate, a delicate cinnamon brown 
becoming darker with age; stem slender, equal or slightly taper¬ 
ing upward, finely striate, minutely scurfy or mealy at least when 
young, hollow, white; spores brownish ferruginous with a faint 
pinkish tint in mass, elliptic, 8-12 x 6-7/x. 

Pileus 2-3 cm. broad; stem 2.5-4 cm. long, 1-2 mm. thick. 
Gregarious or subcespitose. Ground in a greenhouse, Columbus, 
Ohio, August, 1906. Number 4494. Dr. W. A. Kellerman. 

The distinguishing characters of this species are its broadly 
expanded or plane grayish brown pileus with its minutely granu¬ 
lose or mealy surface, its persistently striate margin and its 
very narrow gills becoming brownish with age. The indication 
of a veil is also unusual. 

The species is respectfully dedicated to its discoverer who 
has kindly sent copious notes, specimens, spore-prints and photo¬ 
graph from which the description has been prepared. 

Explanation of Plate 89. — Galera kellermani Peck. A 
half tone illustration of several plants. A very young specimen 
shows the minutely granulose or mealy character of the cap. 
Fully grown plants are shown and in one case the fragments 
of a veil are distinctly seen attached to the margin. 


Journal of Mycology. 


Plate 89. 





GALERA KELLERMANI PECK, 




















July 1906] Better Classification of the Uredinales 


149 


REASONS FOR DESIRING A BETTER CLASSIFICATION 

OF THE UREDINALES.* ) 

BY J. C. ARTHUR. 

There are two especially prominent reasons for the consis¬ 
tent naming of the species of rusts, and for other plants as well. 
One is to be able to designate each particular kind as desired by 
using an authoritative name, and the other is to indicate the 
relationship which that kind holds to other kinds according to 
its recognized place in a natural system. If we examine the 
classification of the Uredinales now in use from these two stand¬ 
points, passing by for the present other points of view, many 
defects will be apparent, even to the verge of thorough con¬ 
fusion. 

The methods by which an authoritative name may be se¬ 
lected, when more than one has been in use, have been much dis¬ 
cussed of late and need not be taken up here. When the general 
rules of nomenclature are applied to the Uredinales, however, a 
complication arises in many cases due to the fact that some of 
the species possess partly or wholly independent phases of ex¬ 
istence during their life cycle; and these different phases have 
such nearly equally prominent characteristics that they were at 
first inevitably placed in separate genera, as if they were autono¬ 
mous organisms. When the different forms of a species are 
collected under one name, it would seem natural and logical that 
the several appellations previously in use for the different phases 
of the species should have consideration. Yet the view, that 
only names applied to the last or telial stage of the species are 
worthy of recognition, is held by many uredinologists. A discus¬ 
sion of this topic can not be taken up here, but it may be worth 
while to state the opinion of the writer that when the real signifi¬ 
cance of the several life phases of the rusts is better appreciated 
the opposition to a logical treatment of the Uredinales in con¬ 
formity with the treatment of other plants will largely, if not 
wholly disappear. In support of this opinion let it be noted that 
those who would discredit the nomenclatorial standing of the 
aecial phase are in the anomalous position of ignoring the sexual 
stage of the species, if we are to accept recent cytological studies, 
which in the case of other plants is considered the pivotal basis 
of classification. 

In passing to the second part of the subject it is worth bear¬ 
ing in mind that the desire for a stable nomenclature should 
never stand in the way of improvement in classification by segre¬ 
gation of genera to bring out more clearly the relationship of 


m rr 


* Read before the American Mycological Society, New Orleans Meet- 
January 1, 1906. 




150 


Journal of Mycology 


[Vol. 12 


groups of species. One of the impediments at the present time 
to an understanding of the interrelationship of rusts lies in the 
lack of reasonable segregation of genera. In support of this 
statement one need only recall the fact that the genus Puccinia 
as now consituted contains more than half of all known species 
of rusts, and what may not be so well known, that within this 
category are contained groups of the most diverse forms and af¬ 
finities. To be assigned to this genus requires only that the rust 
shall possess a two-celled, stalked teliospore. No consideration 
need be given to the nature of the spore wall, whether homogene¬ 
ous or differentiated into well marked layers, or to the 
number and position of the germ pores in each cell, or to the 
question of simple or compound stalks. It is also unnecessary 
to ask whether the life cycle of the rust possesses pycnia, aecia 
and uredinia, in addition to the telia, or whether one or more of 
these is wanting, or what may be the origin of sori in any or all 
of these four stages in relation to the substratum. Yet all these 
characters, and some others, should be kept in mind to rightly 
appreciate the validity of a genus in the Uredinales. In short 
the genus Puccinia is founded upon what is essentially a single 
character, which can not be shown to be correlated with other 
characters going to form a natural grouping of closely related 
organisms. A very similar genus is that of Uromyces , which 
differs from Puccinia apparently only in possessing one-celled 
instead of two-celled teliospores, and all that has been said of 
Puccinia aplies with equal force to Uromyces. These two genera 
.are fine examples of the heterogeneous results of founding genera 
on a single technical character when it can not be shown to be 
also a representative character. 

Let us now turn from the negative to the positive side of the 
discussion, and instead of insisting upon the artificial construc¬ 
tion of the genera Puccinia and Uromyces, let us see what segre¬ 
gation can be made of the species to show more fully their affini¬ 
ties. First of all it will be necessary to study more fully than is 
usual both spores and sori of all the stages or phases of each 
species, including the pycnia. Our attention will soon be at¬ 
tracted to the fact that while the pycnia of the majority of 
species are flask shaped, and arise under the epidermis, some are 
conical or flat, and arise under the cuticle. We shall further find 
that these differences are correlated with characters in the other 
spore forms, especially in the spores and sori of the uredinia 
and the spores of the telia. 

Removing now all species with subcuticular pycnia, and 
directing attention more particularly to the uredinia of this 
segregated group, we shall find species in which the uredinio- 
spores are distinctly different at apex and base, reminding one 
of the urediniospores of the genus Ravenelia. Correlated char¬ 
acters will be found to set aside a group of genera having be- 


July 1906] Better Classification of the Uredinales 


151 


side the peculiar urediniospores also teliospores with verrucose, 
globoid cells and fascicled pedicels, for which Puccinia Pruni- 
spinosae is a good illustration, and still another group of genera 
having teliospores borne one or more on free pedicels, and the 
spores often flattened above and below, for which Uromyces 
brevipes, the rust on Rhus, is representative. 

Having removed these groups of genera related to Rave - 
nelia we shall still have left species with urediniospores of the 
usual appearance, but with sori surrounded by numerous para- 
physes. Among these we shall find a group of genera with pecu¬ 
liarly tuberculate teliospores having lateral germ pores, clearly 
related to Phragmidium, and still another group of genera in 
which the teliospores possess a Hygroscopic layer between the 
outer and inner parts of the wall, clearly related to Uropyxis. 
This latter group is still further separable into genera with 
lateral pores like Uropyxis, or with apical pores like species 
of Puccinia having subepidermal pycnia. 

Having now removed a large number of species from the 
parallel genera Puccinia and Uromyces, and segregated them 
into groups of genera related variously to Ravenelia, Phrag¬ 
midium and Uropyxis, let us look at what remain, all of which 
have flask-shaped pycnia arising from beneath the epidermis. 
We can easily discover here two groups of genera, one hav¬ 
ing indefinitely extended aecia and colorless teliospores, germ¬ 
inating in the sorus as a rule, of which Puccinia evadens found 
on Baccharis is a representative, and the group of genera hav¬ 
ing definite aecia and colored teliospores, embracing all that 
is left of the genera Puccinia and Uromyces, of which most 
grass and sedge rusts, Puccinia Helianthi, etc., are representa¬ 
tives. 

Having now segregated the species usually placed under 
Puccinia and Uromyces into seven groups of genera with affini¬ 
ties extending through the whole length of the Pucciniaceae, 
let us resolve these several groups into their respective genera. 
In order to do this it is necessary to take a glance at the prob¬ 
able scope of the influences which have determined the devel¬ 
opment of the genera in the Uredinales. It seems highly prob¬ 
able that in general the influences which have acted to limit 
and shape the species and also the genera of higher plants, such as 
temperature, humidity, elevation, natural barriers, succession of 
seasons, etc., have also had similar effects upon the species of the 
rusts. In addition to these a set of influences have been brought to 
bear by virtue of their strict parasitism, which are scarcely to be 
paralleled in any other group of plants. This is shown in limit¬ 
ing the species to certain' orders, genera, or even species of 
hosts. How far the host has reacted upon the rust to modify 
its form and structure is difficult to decide, but that such action 
has occurred there seems to be no occasion for doubt. This 


152 


Journal of Mycology 


[Vol. 12 


influence of the substratum in the case of parasitic plants, how¬ 
ever, is doubtless largely comparable with the influence of the 
substratum in non-parasitic plants, only more pronounced. 

But there is an influence which has helped to delimit both 
species and genera among the Uredinales, not found apparently 
in any other group of plants. This influence is difficult to 
define, but it is manifested in directing the phylogenic course 
of development within the group, by which the life-cycle is 
shortened. 

There appears to be ample justification in assuming that 
at a comparatively early period in the evolution of the Uredinales 
all the rusts possessed four forms of spore-structures, pycnia, 
aecia, uredinia and telia. We need not go back of this period 
to inquire how they came to have the four kinds of spores, as 
it does not affect in the least our present contention. But dur¬ 
ing the universally four-sporecl condition for the order, some 
influence began to affect the relative production of the several 
spore-forms, which eventuated in the suppression of one or more 
of these from certain species or group of species. As a result 
of this influence we find that the Uredinales of the present day 
consist of groups of species in the several divisions of the order, 
generally regarded as genera, which in many cases can be again 
separated into at least four groups of species, according as they 
possess all spore-forms, all but aecia, all but uredinia, or finally 
only telia. In each of these four groups the pycnia are gener¬ 
ally present, but in some species of the last named group even 
pycnia may fail. 

Among the melampsoraceous rusts there has been an un¬ 
premeditated, and largely unrecognized tendency to regard the 
absence of certain spore-forms as among valid generic charac¬ 
ters, but among the pucciniaceous rusts such a tendency is dis¬ 
tinctly opposed. That this is, however, a generic character of 
importance among rusts generally, I not only venture to affirm, 
but believe that it will in many cases be found to be associated 
with other characters further indicating true generic grouping. 
It is among the genuine Pucciniae after other genera have been 
removed as indicated above, that this character for separating 
genera finds its most uniform and conspicuous application. 
This is in fact exactly what should be expected, for this group 
undoubtedly represents the highest and most complex develop¬ 
ment of the Uredinales. 

In advocating the importance of recognizing the life-cycle 
in drawing generic distinctions it is well to forestall misappre¬ 
hension by pointing out that the usual absence of a spore-form 
does not necessarily constitute an abbreviated life-cycle. Many 
species of rusts in northern regions especially have the habit 
of propagating themselves from year to year largely by the ure- 
diniospores which survive the winter, either as continuously pro- 


July 1906] Better Classification of the Uredinales 


153 


duced spores on living leaves, as in the case of Puccinia Poarum 
and P. rubigo-vera , or as stray spores no longer connected with 
a living host, as in P. Sorghi and P. graminis. In such cases the 
uredinia are usually followed each season by a greater or less 
development of telia, which serve little or no purpose in the 
propagation of the species, as the proper host plants for the 
aecia may be rare or absent. Such a condition explains the 
great prevalence of such species as Coleosporium Solidaginis 
and Melampsora Medusae when suitable coniferous hosts do not 
occur within hundreds of miles, and their aecia are rarely or 
never collected. Again in warmer regions a species is main¬ 
tained through its urediniospores alone, the other spore-forms 
rarely or never being seen. But these are not instances of ab¬ 
breviated life-cycle within the meaning here implied. They are 
a form of extended conidial propagation, the full life-cycle, when¬ 
ever circumstances permit it to be completed, showing all spore- 
forms. In other cases the completed life-cycle may show less 
than the full number of spore-forms, as in Puccinia umbellP 
ferarum, where the aecia are wanting, etc. 

While every genus heading a large section of the Uredinales, 
like Coleosporium, Melamspora,, Cronartium , Ravenelia , Phrag- 
midium, etc., is theoretically capable of division into four genera 
in accordance with the extent of the life-cycle, yet forms are 
not known in all cases to permit of such a division, and no uni¬ 
formity exists in regard to the proportional number of species 
falling into each of the newly delimited genera. Moreover, 
in many cases other characters demand recognition, and alto¬ 
gether it will be found that the admission of the life-cycle as a 
generic character does not result in a mathematical regularity 
of genera, throughout the order, as at first sight might be as¬ 
sumed. 

If we require that a genus should represent as fully as 
possible a group of organisms giving evidence of having been 
derived from the same ancestors, and therefore with species 
more closely related genetically to one another than to those of 
any other genus, it becomes necessary to explain a well known 
parallelism, brought to our attention by Fischer of Switzerland. 
He showed that in many cases the teliospores of a species having 
an extremely abbreviated life-cycle, e. g. Puccinia Leucanthemi, 
closely resemble in structure those of an autoecious species, e. g. 
P. Aecidii-Leucanthemi, in which the host of its aecia is the same 
or practically so as the host of the abbreviated species. Tranz- 
schel has successfully applied this rule of parallelism in predict¬ 
ing the host of the unrecognized aecia in certain heteroecious 
species. In such cases of parallelism there can be no doubt that 
the forms in question have truly descended from a common an¬ 
cestor, but dating a long way back, even to the early days when 
all the rusts had four spore-forms. Searching for an adequate 


154 


Journal of Mycology 


LVol. 12 


cause to account for the breaking up of a primitive species into 
two or more modern parallel species with different lengths of 
life-cycle, I think it may be found in the augmented influence of 
parasitism. In the primitive times the rusts were doubtless but 
weakly parasitic, but in their onward development parasitism 
with its restricting and reducing effects became constantly more 
pronounced. To develop the theory here would extend this 
article beyond reasonable limits, but it is believed to fully ac¬ 
count for the observed parallelism. It also accounts for the 
fact that essentially the same shortening of the life-cycle occurs 
or may be looked for in every group of the Uredimles, but is 
most extensive in the groups showing the greatest differentia¬ 
tion and highest development. And finally it does not militate 
in the opinion of the writer against the validity of genera whose 
ultimate distinction is that of the length of the life-cycle, but 
lends important aid in tracing their relationships. 

The arguments in this article have in the main been directed 
against or received their support from the old-time genus Puc- 
cinia and its consort Uromyces, believing that whatever would 
prove acceptable to systematists in this connection can readily 
be extended to the whole order of the Uredimles. I have thus 
presented some of the reasons which appeal to me for desiring 
a better classification of the Uredinales, believing that when 
obtained it will promote the study of the order and facilitate 
.an understanding of relationships. 


NORTH AMERICAN SPECIES OF LEPIOTA. 

A. P. MORGAN. 

The name Lepiota was given by Persoon to the first section 
of his genus Agaricus; it had a wider application in the “Syn¬ 
opsis” than is assigned to it in the genus of the same name at the 
present time. Fries in the “‘Systema” made of the term Lepiota 
a tribal designation, restricting it to the species of Agaricus about 
as understood at present. The species thus included are well 
worthy of generic distinction. 

Fries in the Hymenomycetes Europaei enumerates 45 species 
of Lepiota. Since the publication of this volume (1874) Euro¬ 
pean mycologists have increased the number to more than 100. 
'The region most prolific in species of this genus so far dis¬ 
covered is the island of Ceylon where upward of 70 species were 
enumerated and described by Berkeley and Broome. Sacardo in 
the different volumes of the Sylloge Fungorum enumerates more 
than 300 species. 

Schweinitz in the North American Fungi (1834) gives a list 
<of 5 species of Lepiota. In Lea’s Catalogue (1849) there is a 



July 1906 ] North American Species of Lepiota 


155 


list of 4 species. Sprague in one of his papers (1858) enumer¬ 
ates 5 species. The Amherst Catalogue (1875) contains 11 
species. The Pacific Coast Catalogue (1850) 5 species. Com¬ 
prehensive and critical work upon the Fungi of North America 
began with the publication ( in 1870) of the 23d Report of the 
State Botanist of New York, Charles H. Peck. The series of 
Reports upon the Fungi of the State of New York issued an¬ 
nually from that year up to the present suggests the extent and 
richness of the Northern Fungal Flora. 

There has been enumerated up to this time near 80 species 
of North American Lepiotas, plainly an inadequate number for 
the vast territory considered. Peck’s monograph of the genus in 
the 35th New York Report (1882), appears to be still about all 
we have to work with; it describes only 18 species! It is there¬ 
fore suggested that we endeavor to marshall the species known 
and described up to date into some sort of order that we may, 
first, make a more critical study of them, and secondly, bring to 
light such species as are not yet recognized. For this purpose 
we are applying to North American species a scheme of arrange¬ 
ment which we make use of to refer to the numerous species of 
Lepiota described in the Sylloge Fungorum. 

Lepiota Persoon , Synopsis 1801 ; Fries, Syst. Myc. 1821. 
Hym. Eur. 18/4; Saccardo, Sylloge Fungorum, V, IX, XI, 
XIV, XVI, XVII. 

Pileus soft fleshy, rather dry; veil marginal. Stipe hollow 
or fibrous-stuffed, rarely solid, commonly tapering upward from 
a thickened base; volva none. Lamellae free, approximate or 
remote, rarely reaching the stipe; spores white, sometimes zvith 
a tinge of pink or yellow, in one species bright green. 

Agarics varying in size from the largest to very small, grow¬ 
ing usually in rich soil, a few species on old decaying wood. The 
surface of the pileus may be smooth and glabrous, more com¬ 
monly the dermis is broken up into granules, warts and scales; 
in a few species the surface is viscid or glutinous. Fries invests 
the pileus in this genus with a universal veil concrete with the 
dermis. According to De Bary, Brefeld and others there is 
but a partial or marginal veil. This veil is a membrane joining 
the margin of the pileus to the surface of the stipe; it continues 
to grow along with the general growth of the pileus and stipe 
until the time of the hyponastic upward expansion of the former 
when it is torn away from the margin of the pileus and is left 
behind upon the stipe. The mode of development of the partial 
veil and the manner of its rupture occur in three different ways 
which are made use of to arrange the species of Lepiota into 
three different sections. These sections are defined in accord¬ 
ance with the views of De Bary as expressed in his Comparative 
Morphology. 


156 


Journal of Mycology 


[Vol. 12 


§ i. ANNULI INFERI. THE VEIL IN THIS SEC¬ 
TION HAS A TWO-FOLD ORIGIN; IT IS A CONTINUA¬ 
TION OF THE OUTERMOST ROW OF CELLS OF THE 
STIPE WHICH HAS GROWN FOR SOME TIME WITH 
THE STIPE BY INTERCALARY GROWTH AND PASSES 
INTO THE MARGIN OF THE PILEDS; AND CON¬ 
VERSELY IT IS A CONTINUATION OF THE OUTER¬ 
MOST HYPHAE OF THE PILEUS PASSING INTO THE 
SURFACE OF THE STIPE. THE SEPARATION TAKES 
PLACE AT THE MARGIN OF THE PILEUS, THE VEIL 
REMAINS ATTACHED TO THE STIPE AS A RING OR 
AS A SHEATH RUNNING DOWN ITS SURFACE OR 
SOMETIMES PORTIONS OF IT FORM A FRINGE OR 
APPENDAGE TO THE MARGIN OF THE PILEUS. 

I. MESOMORPHAE. Dermis of the pileus entire, the 
surface of both pileus and stipe smooth and glabrous; the veil 
annulate, often evanescent. 

A tribe of small Agarics. More than a dozen species are 
enumerated in the Sylloge Fungorum. 

1. LEPIOTA MESOMORPHA Bulliard, Herb. Fr. 1791. 

Pileus a little fleshy, campanulate then expanded, dry, 

smooth and glabrous, whitish, ochraceous or yellowish. Stipe 
short, slender, hollow, smooth and glabrous, concolorous with the 
pileus ; the annulus more or less persistent. Lamellae rather nar¬ 
row, white, free, approximate; spores elliptic-ovoid, 4-5 x 3 mic. 

Growing on the ground in woods. Preston, O. Pileus about 
2 cm. in diameter, the stipe 5-7 cm. long and about 2 mm. thick. 

2. LEPIOTA RUFIPES Morgan sp. nov. 

Pileus a little fleshy, convex, smooth and glabrous, white. 
Stipe slender, smooth and glabrous, rufescent, paler at the 
summit; the annulus evanescent. Lamellae broad, close, white, 
free, approximate; spores oblong, 4-5 x 3 mic. 

Growing on the ground in woods among old leaves; Pres¬ 
ton, O. Pileus about a centimeter in diameter, the stipe 2-3 
cm. long. 

II. EUCONIATI. Dermis of the pileus not lacerate, but 
the surface pruinose, finely pulverulent or minutely fur fur ace oils; 
the investment of the stipe usually similar to that of the pileus; 
the veil often afpendiculate. 

These are mostly small Agarics easily recognized by the 
powdery surface of the pileus. 

A. STIPE GLABROUS. 

3. LEPIOTA CRISTATELLA Peck, 31st N. Y. Rep. 1878. 

Pileus thin, convex, subumbonate, minutely mealy especially 

on the margin, white, the disk slightly tinged with pink; the 
Veil lacerate, leaving fragments on the margin or evanescent. 


July 1906] North A??ierican Species of Lepiota 


157 


Stipe slender, hollow, glabrous, whitish. Lamellae close, rounded 
behind, free, white; spores subelliptic, 5 mic. long. 

Growing in mossy places in the woods. New York. Peck . 
Pileus 4-8 mm. in diameter, the stipe 2-3 cm. long and about 
1 mm. thick. 

B. STIPE PULVERULENT OR MINUTELY FUR - 
FURACEOUS. 

4. LEPIOTA CHEIMONOCEPS B. & C. Fungi Cub - 
I867. 

Snow-white. Pileus thin, pulverulent; the margin here and 
there appendiculate. Stipe thickened downward, furfuraceous; 
the annulus lacerate. Lamellae rather broad, free, remote; 
spores subglobose, 8x6 mic. 

Growing on logs. Cuba. Wright. Pileus 2-4- cm. in diam¬ 
eter, the stipe 2-3 cm. long. A very pretty species. 

5. LEPIOTA NOSCITATA Britzelmayer, Derm, et Mel. 

App. 

Pileus ovoid-conic then expanded, subumbonate, white, 
rufescent in the center, glabrous or very minutely flocculose; 
the margin faintly striate. Stipe elongated, hollow, tapering up¬ 
ward, very minutely flocculose, rufescent; the annulus minutely 
flocculose, evanescent. Lamellae white, rather broad, free; spores 
ovoid-oblong, 3.5-4.5 x 3 mic. 

Growing in rich soil in woods, Preston, O. Pileus 2-3 cm. in 
diameter, the stipe 4-6 cm. long and 2-3 mm. thick. 

6. LEPIOTA SEMINUDA Lasch, Linnaea III. 1828. 

Pileus very thin, campanulate then expanded, umbonate, floc- 

cose-mealy, at length naked, whitish or pinkish; the margin ap¬ 
pendiculate by the torn veil. Stipe hollow, slender, farinaceous. 
Lamellae rather narrow, white, reaching the stipe; spores ovoid, 
3-4 x 2.5 mic. 

Growing on the ground in woods. Preston, O. Pileus 2-3 
cm. in diameter, the stipe 3-5 cm. long and about 2 mm. thick. 

7. LEPIOTA PARVANULATA Lasch, Linnaea III, 
1828. 

Pileus a little fleshy, ovoid then campanulate and ex- 
planate, subumbonate, even, slightly silky or subpruinate, white 
with a tinge of ochre in drying. Stipe subequal, slender, hollow, 
white, below the annulus fibrillose. Lamellae broad, white, close, 
free, approximate; spores elliptic, 3-4 x 2.5 mic. 

Growing on the ground in grassy places. Preston, O. Pi¬ 
leus about a centimeter in diameter, the stipe 2-3 cm. long and 
about 2 mm. thick. 

8. LEPIOTA CYANOZONATA Longyear, 3 Rep. Mich. 
Ac. Sci. 1901. 


158 


Journal of Mycology 


[Vol. 12 


Pileus a little fleshy, ovoid then campanulate and expanded, 
subumbonate, minutely fibrillose when young, soon glabrous, 
creamy or pinkish white with a narrow zone of light blue near 
the margin; the veil delicate, fibrous, evanescent. Stipe nearly 
equal, fistulose, whitish, minutely scaly, attached by an abundant 
strigose mycelium. Lamellae rather broad, whitish, free, ap¬ 
proximate ; spores subglobose, with a minute apiculus, 6-8 mic. 

Growing on decaying sticks on the ground in woods; Michi¬ 
gan. Longyear. Pileus 1-2 cm. in diameter, the stipe 2-3 cm. 
long and about 2 mm. thick. The whole plant becomes brownish 
when bruised and in drying. “Its striking feature is the delicate 
blue marginal zone which is suggestive of the specific name/’ 

9. LEPIOTA PURPUREOCONIA Atkinson, Journal 
Mycol. 1902. 

Pileus thin, convex, the surface covered with a purplish 
powder; the marginal veil consisting of the same powdery sub¬ 
stance. Stipe thick, solid, whitish within, below the annulus 
covered by the same purplish powder as the pileus. Lamellae 
broad, rather distant, white or yellowish, free, approximate; 
spores elliptic, 8-10x3-4 mic. 

Growing on the ground in woods; New York. Atkinson. 
Pileus 1-2 cm. in diameter, the stipe 4-5 cm. long and 3-4 mm. 
in thickness. 

10. LEPIOTA ECITODORA Atkinson, Journal Mycol. 
1902. 

Pileus thin, convex, pale lavender, minutely scaly or pruin- 
ose; the veil powdery and evanescent. Stipe tapering down¬ 
ward, white and pruinose above, dark brown to blackish below. 
Lamellae narrow, rounded behind, free, yellowish; spores cyl- 
indric, 9-11 x 2.0-2.5 mic. 

Growing on the ground in woods. New York. Atkinson . 
Pileus 2 cm. in diameter, the stipe 4-5 cm. long and 2-3 mm. 
thick. “Odor foetid resembling that of Eciton ants.” 

11. LEPIOTA PULVERACEA Peck, 54th N. Y. Rep. 
1900. 

Pileus convex then expanded, pulverulent or minutely granu- 
lose, whitish or fulvescent; the veil evanescent. Stipe thick, hol¬ 
low, granulose or squamulose below the annulus and colored as 
the pileus. Lamellae white or yellowish, adnexed; spores oval 
4x3 mic. 

Growing in woods on prostrate trunks of Spruce trees. New 
York. Peck. Pileus 2-3 cm. in diameter, the stipe 3-5 cm. long 
and 3-4 mm. in thickness. 

12. LEPIOTA PUSILLOMYCES Peck, 28th N. Y. Rep. 

i8 75- . 

Pileus ovoid then campanulate and expanded, subumbonate. 


July 1906 ] Descriptive Synopses of Morgan's , Etc. 


159 


whitish or dusky, flocculose-pulverulent; the margin appendicu- 
late by the lacerate veil. Stipe slender, nearly equal, fibrous- 
stuffed, rufescent beneath the white pulverulence. Lamellae very 
broad, white, free, approximate; spores elliptic-oblong, 4-5 x 3 
mic. 

Growing in rich soil among old leaves in woods. New 
York. Peck. Plentiful about Preston, O. Pileus 10-15 mm - 
in diameter, the stipe 2-4 cm. long and 1-2 mm. thick. The pul¬ 
verulence consists of thin-walled globular cells. 

(To be continued.) 


DESCRIPTIVE SYNOPSES OF MORGAN'S NORTH 
AMERICAN SPECIES OF MARASMUS/ 

A. P. MORGAN. 

MARASMIUS Fries. Gen. Hym. 1836. 

Fungi tough and flexible f drying up and more or less per¬ 
sistant, not putrescent, reviving when moistened. Hymenophore 
continuous with the stipe but heterogenous, descending into the 
trama; veil none. Stipe cartilaginous or horny. Lamellae tough 
and flexible, sub distant, the edge acute and entire; spores white. 

Agarics small or minute, growing for the most part upon 
wood or among the old leaves in woods. 

§ 1. COLLYBI A.— PILEUS TOUGH -FLESHY AT 
LENGTH SUBCORIACEOUS, COMMONLY SULCATE 
OR RUGULOSE, THE MARGIN AT FIRST INVOLUTE. 
STIPE SUBCARTILAGINOUS. LAMELLAE ADNATE 
OR NEARLY FREE. 

I. SCORTEI. Stipe solid or medullate-stuffed, then hol¬ 
low, fibrous within, externally a detersile villosity clothing the 
cartilaginous cuticle. Lamellae seceding-free. 

A. STIPE WOOLLY OR STRIGOSE AT THE BASE. 

a. Lamellae sub distant. 1-7. [Species Numbers.] 

b. Lamellae rather close. 8-14. 

B. STIPE NAKED AT THE BASE OFTEN COM¬ 
POSED OF TWISTED FIBRES. 15-18. 

II. TERGINI. Stipe rooting , definitely tubularnot 
fibrous, but manifestly cartilaginous. Lamellae seceding-free. 
Pileus thinner than those of the former, hygrophanous 

* This should have immediately followed the article to which it per¬ 
tains— these synoptic descriptions serving well for a key to the species. 
As a separate it can be placed with the separate of the monograph. — 
Editor.] 




160 Journal of Mycology [Vol. 12 

A. STIPE WOOLLY BELOW OR AT THE BASE, 
GLABROUS ABOVE. 

a. Pileus even or only rugulose. 19-22. 

b. Pileus striate or plicate-sulcate. 23-26. 

B. STIPE, AT LEAST WHEN DRY, EVERYWHERE 
PR UIN A TE- V EL VE T Y. 

a. Pileus even or only rugulose. 27-32. 

b. Pileus striate or plicate-sulcate. 33-37. 

III. STYLOBATAE. Pileus convex-involute, then plane 
and depressed. Stipe cartilaginous without a root, dilated at the 
base into a circular disk or floccose tubercle. Lamellae adnate. 
Growing on old wood, branchlets, sticks, etc. 

A. STIPE GLABROUS. 

a. Lamellae colored. 38-41. 

b. Lamellae white or pallid. 42-44. 

B. STIPE VELVETY OR PRUINOSE. 

a. Lamellae colored. 45-46. 

b Lamellae white or pallid. 47-51. 

IV. CALOPODES. Pileus convex-involute, then plane, 
and depressed. Stipe short, insititious (i. e. ingrafted, the my¬ 
celium innate and not visible). Lamellae adnate. 

Growing on old wood, trunks } branches, etc. 

A. STIPE GLABROUS. 

a. Lamllae colored. 52-54. 

b. Lamellae white or pallid. 

d. Pileus colored. 55 - 58 . 

b'. Pileus white or pallid. 59 - 60 . 

B. STIPE VELVETY OR PRUINATE. 

a. Lamellae colored. 61-62. 

b. Lamellae white or pallid. 

d. Pileus colored. 68-66. 
b' Pileus white or pallid. 

a". Stipe colored. 67-69. 

b". Stipe white or pallid. 70-74. 

§ 2. MYCENA. PILEUS FROM SUB-CARNOSE TQ 
MEMBRANACEOUS, CONVEX OR CAMPANULATE, 
THE MARGIN AT FIRST STRAIGHT AND APPRESSED. 
STIPE CARTILAGINOUS, TOUGH, DRY, FISTULOUS. 
LAMELLAE FREE OR ADNEXED, NOT DECURRENT. 

I. LONGIPEDES. Pileus a little fleshy or submembra- 
naceous, convex or campanulate then expanded. Stipe elongated 
and rooting among old leaves or in rotten wood. Lamellae free 
or attached to the stipe. 


July 1906] Descriptive Synopses op Morgan's , Etc. 


161 


A. STIPE GLABROUS. 75-78. 

B. STIPE PRUINATE OR VELVETY. 

a. Lamellae free from the stipe. 79-80. 

b. Lamellae attached to the stipe. 81-85. 

II. SARMENTOSI. Stipes arising from an ascending or 
prostrate common stem. 

A. STIPES GLABROUS. 86-87. 

B. STIPES PUBESCENT. 88-89. 

III. GLABELLI. Pileus thin, membranaceous, convex 
or campanulate, commonly plicate-sulcate. Stipe slender, nearly 
always glabrous, arising from a doccose tubercle or from a circu¬ 
lar disk. Lamellae few or distant, free or adnexed. Growing on 
old wood, sticks, leaves, etc. 

a. Lamellae free or subfree. 90-96. 

b. Lamellae attached to the stipe. 

a. Lamellae colored. 97-102. 

b'. Lamellae white or pallid. 103-106. 

IV. INSITITII. PILEUS, THIN MEMBRANACEOUS, 
CONVEX OR CAMPANULATE, USUALLY PLICATE- 
SULCATE , STIPE FILIFORM, RIGID OR OFTEN FLAC¬ 
CID, MOSTLY GLABROUS, THE BASE INSITITIOUS. 
LAMELLAE EITHER ATTACHED TO THE STIPE OR 
FREE; IN THIS CASE THEY ARE ATTACHED TO A 
COLLAR WHICH ENCIRCLES THE APEX OF THE 
STIPE AND IS FREE FROM IT. 

Growing commonly on the petioles, midribs and principal 
veins of old leaves, sometimes on herbaceous stems, etc. 

A. STIPE GLABROUS. 

a. Lamellae attached to the stipe. 

a. LAMELLAE COLORED. 107-108. 
b'. LAMELLAE WHITE. 

a". Pileus colored. 109-114. 

b". Pileus white or whitish. 115-120. 

b. Lamellae adnate to a free collar. 121-126. 

B. STIPE VELVETY OR PRUINATE. 

a. Pileus colored. 127-129. 

b. Pileus white or whitish. 

a. Pileus plicate-sulcate. 130-131. 

b'. Pileus even or only rugulose. 132-134. 

§ 3. OMPHALIA. PILEUS SUBMEMBRANACEOUS; 
THE STIPE CENTRAL, CARTILAGINOUS,FISTULOSE, 
SOMEWHAT THICKENED UPWARD; THE LAMEL¬ 
LAE TRULY DECURRENT. 


162 Journal of Mycology [Vol. 12 

I. CYATHIFORMES. Pileus submembranaceous, at 
length depressed, umbilicate or even inf undibuliform. 

A. STIPE GLABROUS. 135-140. 

B. STIPE VELVETY OR PRUINATE. 141-143. 

II. CLAVIFORMES. Pileus membranaceous , campanu- 
late or convex, never depressed. 

A. STIPE GLABROUS. 144-145. 

B. STIPE VELVETY OR PRUINATE. 146-148. 

§ 4. PLEUROTUS. PILEUS MORE OR LESS IR¬ 
REGULAR; THE STIPE EX CENTRIC, LATERAL OR 
WANTING. COMMONLY GROWING ON WOOD. 

A. STIPE EXCENTRIC. 

a. Lamellae colored. 149-151. 

b. Lamellae white. 152-153. 

B. STIPE LATERAL AND VERY SHORT. 

a. Lamellae colored. 154-158. 

b. Lamellae white or pallid. 159-162. 

SYNOPSIS TO NORTH AMERICAN SPECIES OF 

HELIOMYCES. 

HELIOMYCES Le'ville Champ, exot. Am. Sc. Nat. 1844. 

Pileus coriaceous- or membranaceous-tremellose, plicate- 
sulcate or rugulose. Stipe central, tough , cylindric, hstulose. 
Lamellae similar in substance to the pileus, the edge acute; spores 
white. 

Small Agarics which are tremelloid when fresh and growing, 
and when dry have the appearance of Marasmii. 

A. STIPE GLABROUS. 

a. Pileus colored from the first. 1-2. 

b. Pileus at first white. 3-4. 

B. STIPE PRUINOSE. 5-6. 


FIELD NOTES ON THE UREDINEAE. 

A. O. GARRETT. 

The following notes refer to collections of rusts made during 
the past three years at the head of Big Cottonwood Canyon, 
about thirty miles from Salt Lake City. The altitudes for the 
following species range from 8,500 to 9,500 feet. 

Puccinia scandica Johans. — On Aug. 13 the writer col¬ 
lected an aecidium on young plants of Epilobium alpinum which 



July 1906] 


Field Notes on the Uredineae 


163 


was determined both by Sydow and Holway as the aecidial stage 
of Puccinia epilobii-tetragoni (DC.) Winter. On the same host 
but in a different locality Puccinia. scandica Johans, was collected 
three days later — the first American collection of this species. 
The opinion was then formed that the aecidia previously col¬ 
lected were connected with Puccinia scandica; and collecting in 
the same locality the two succeeding seasons has strengthened 
this opinion for the following reasons: i, I have never found 
teleutosori of Puccinia epilobii-tetragoni in this region, nor in 
any other at so high an altitude; 2. The aecidia reach their 
greatest abundance some time before the teleutospores of P. 
scandica appear; 3. Several specimens were obtained this past 
season in which both aecidia and teleutosori were found on the 
same plant, and even on the same leaf. The aecidia have, how¬ 
ever, been collected upon hosts upon which the teleutosori of P. 
scandica have not yet been found. 

Puccinia caricis-asteris Arth. — Just about dark on Au¬ 
gust 11, 1905, a collection was made of the aecidia of this species 
on Aster adscendens. The following day another trip was made to 
the spot for the purpose of finding the teleutosori if possible. The 
Aster plants were growing among a profusion of Carex festiva. 
An Aster bearing defunct aecidia was soon found; and the sur¬ 
rounding Carex was well infected. 

A few days later in another locality the aecidia were found 
on Aster Fremonti with abundant infection on the adjacent Carex 
festiva. A half mile or so away a collection had been made on 
July 11, of the aecidia on Aster ciliomarginatus Rydb. Inspection 
of the Carex festiva in this vicinity showed abundance of tel¬ 
eutosori. 

Aecidium monoicum Peck. — A collection of this aecidium 
on Arabis Drummondii being made July 22, 1905, in a locality 
where there was a large number of the infected hosts, a return 
was made to the place on August 21 to search for the alternate 
form. A host plant bearing defunct aecidia was soon located, 
and the surrounding plants were carefully examined with the 
result that teleutosori were found on Trisetum subspicatum, The 
two host-plants were intimately associated in growth, and further 
examination revealed the fact that the Trisetum rust was found 
only on those plants that were immediately adjacent to infected 
Arabis plants. Specimens of the Trisetum rust have been sent 
to Dr. Arthur, and he believes it to be undescribed. 

a Caeoma confluens (Pers.) Schroeter. — On July 3, 1905, 
a collection of this rust was made on Ribes vallicola. The host- 
plants grow along the banks of the mountain streams, and the 
lowermost willow branches frequently touch the Ribes bushes as 
they are swayed by the wind. A collection was made of a 
Melampsora on Salix in August, 1903, and again each of the 
following Augusts. It is the belief of the writer that these two 


164 


Journal of Mycology 


[Vol. 12 


forms are connected for the following reasons: First, the two 
hosts are intimately associated in growth. Second, the appear¬ 
ance of the Caeoma antedates that of the Melampsora. Third, 
the Melampsora occurs on those willow branches low enough to 
brush against the Ribes bushes, or else to be easily infected by 
the wind. Fourth, during the latter part of the season of 1905, 
whenever an infected Salix was found, search was made for the 
Ribes bush and then for defunct aecidia, almost invariably with 
successful results. Fifth, the Salix goes to the mouth of the 
Canyon, but the Ribes accompany them less than half-way. 
When the Ribes stops, the Melampsora also stops. 


NOTES FROM MYCOLOGICAL LITERATURE, XX. 

W. A. ICELLERMAN. 

R. A. Harper's work on Sexual Reproduction and the 
Organization of the Nucleus in Certain Mildews is Publication 
No. 37 of the Carnegie Institution of Washington, pp. 1-104. PI. 
I-VII, September 1905. Of this interesting and important in¬ 
vestigation no brief summary can be made, but the author’s con¬ 
ception as to alternation of generations in the higher fungi may 
be quoted in part. “In the rusts we have sexual reproduction by 
vegetative fertilization. The fusing cells are perhaps morpho¬ 
logically vegetative offshoots of an egg-cell. ... In the 
Basidiomycetes by apogamy sexual cell fusion may have disap¬ 
peared or we may have vegetative fertilization. ... In the 
Ascomycetes we have sexual reproduction and alternation of gen¬ 
erations, modified by the adaptation of the spore mother cell as an 
explosive organ for the dissemination of the spores and as a stor¬ 
age reservoir for the production of resting spores with a large 
supply of metaplasmic reserve products.” . . . 

C. L. Shear gives an account of some out-door in¬ 
oculations made in the Spring of 1902, under the title of Peri¬ 
dermium cerebrum Peck and Cronartium quercuum (Berk,), pp. 
89-92, Journal of Mycology, Volume 12, May 1906. On May 
1st aecidiospores of Peridermium cerebrum (from Pinus vir- 
giniana) were successfully applied to Quercus coccinea — uredo 
sori appearing May 12. Shirai has by inoculation proven the 
connection between Cronartium gigantium (Mayr) Tubeuf find 
what he calls Cronartium quercuum (Cooke) Miyabe. Mr. Shear 
is of the opinion that Peridermium gigantium (Mayr) Tubeuf is 
the same as P. cerebrum Peck described many years earlier. 

The North American Species of Heliomyces —6 in num¬ 
ber—are grouped and diagnosed in the Journal of Mycology for 



July 1906] Notes from Mycological Literature 


165 


May 1906. These are small Agarics which are tremelloid when 
fresh and growing, and when dry have the appearance of Maras- 
mii. Prof. Morgan affixes these to his Monograph of Marasmius 
(published in previous Nos. of the same Journal) to which genus 
in fact most of the species were originally referred. Both the 
Marasmius and the Heliomyces species are indexed together— 
and also issued as one pamphlet {Separate ). 

In Science for May 25, 1906, Charles J. Chamberlin 
points out that Mega as a prefix in such words as megaspore, 
megasporophyll, megasporocarp, megaphyllous, should be used 
rather than macro (macrospore, etc.), since mega, from the Greek 
me gas, means big, great, large, — equivalent to the Latin mag- 
nus, and is the opposite of micro. But macro means long, is not 
the opposite of micro, but of the Greek brachus which means 
short. If the idea is that of great size rather than of great length 
the prefix mega not macro should be used. 

Paraphyses in the Genus Glomerella, by John L. Shel¬ 
don, is reported in Science, N. S. 23 1851-2, 1 June 1906. Allusion 
to the fact is made, that there is no evidence that those who 
studied Gloeosporium (Atkinson, Stoneman, Clinton, Spaulding 
and von Schrenk) saw anything suggesting paraphyses — in fact, 
Clinton says ‘there was no sign of paraphyses/ and Spaulding and 
von Schrenk in describing the genus Glomerella say that it is 
‘aparaphysate.’ The author found in cultures of G. rufomaculans 
isolated from a Baldwin apple, perithecia containing long slender 
paraphyses. 

Fungi as related to weather and Fungi upon the Experi¬ 
ment Grounds — the former extracts from the weekly “Weather 
and Crop Bulletinsthe latter notes on the occurrence of a 
few parasitic fungi — are given on pp. 510-512 and 517 in the 
Report of the Botanist, [B. D. Halsted] N. J. Agr. Coll. Exp. 
Station Report for the year 1905, issued 1906. 

A Cause of Freak Peas is given with one half-tone illustra¬ 
tion of abnormal plants in Torreya for April, 1906. The cause is 
Ascochyta pisi Lib., a fungus that attacks not only the growing 
pea-stems and leaves, but also the pods and thence may grow 
into the seed. 

A Key to the Agariceae of temperate North America 
is given by William A. Murrill in the Dec. No. (1905) of Tor¬ 
reya. The Agariceae here enumerated are not ordinary gill- 
fungi, but a subfamily of the Polyporaceae with furrowed hy- 
menium. They are corky or woody, not fleshy. The genera in¬ 
cluded are Agaricus, Cerrena, Lenzites, Gloeophyllum and Cy- 
cloporus. The key is carried to the species in each case — gotten 
up on the dichotomal plan. 


166 


Journal of Mycology 


LVol. 12 


A discussion of Fuenfstueck's and Zahlbruckner's 
treatment of Lichens in the Pflanzenfamilien is given by Al¬ 
bert Schneider in the May Torreya (1905) under the title: The 
Classification of Lichens. They are not recognized as an autono¬ 
mous group by all. There is great confusion with regard to the 
delimitation of lichen species. The number of good species 
(continues the author) is in all probability less than one-fifth 
•of those actually described. The system of classification proposed 
by Zahlbruckner is excellent and should be generally adopted. 

A list of twenty additional species is given by G. A. 
Reichling in Torreya, May 1905, as Contributions to the recorded 
Fungi and Slime-Mould Flora of Long Island. 

George Massee gives an interesting account of A 
Fungus parasitic on a Moss, in Torreya, March 1906. It occurs 
on Weisia viridula, the capsule of the moss under normal con¬ 
ditions being usually erect and symmetrical, when attacked by 
the parasite however it becomes distinctly curved and unsym- 
metrical. The description is under the following name: Epicoc- 
cum torquens Massee n. sp. 

Fungi Columbiani, Century XXI, by Elam Bartholo¬ 
mew, is dated March 20, 1905. The following new species are 
included: Cladosporium nervale Ell. & Dearn. on living leaves 
of Rhus typhina; Diaporthe ostryigena Ell. & Dearn. on trunks 
and branches of Ostrya virginica; Haplosporella conmixta Bar- 
thol. on fallen limbs of Ulmus pubescens; Polystigma adenosto- 
matis Farlow n. sp., on living leaves of Adenostoma fasciculatum; 
Dichromera prunicola Ell. & Dearn. on Prunus virginiana, and 
Sphaeropsis magnoliae Ell. & Dearn. on Magnolia (acuminata?). 
In this country the genus most largely represented is Puccinia 
with 26 pockets; there are 5 Uromyces, and 7 Septorias. 

Some Factors in the color production in a species of Fu- 
sarium is discussed by Dr. J. B. Pollock, in Science N. S. 
231422-3, Mar. 16, 1906. The Fusarium taken from an ear 
of corn was under culture found to develop its bright salmon- 
pink only in bright sun light; moisture also is of significance — 
the moister the medium the less the color showed. Color varied 
on media of different constitutions — pale on cornstarch; on 
carrot, Hubbard squash and cornmeal the color was between 
roseous and testaceous (Sacc. Chrom.) ; on apple, onion and 
potato, almost exactly ochraceous; on wheat flour slightly paler 
than orange; on buckwheat flour it was darkest red, slightly 
redder than testaceous, on raw dahlia tubers bright red, but 
almost no color produced if the medium is steamed — and the 
fungus produced a green color. 

In respect to the Parasitism of Neocosmospora, Howard 
'S. Reed shows, in Science N. S. 23:751-2, May 11, 1906, that 


July 1906] Notes from Mycological Literature 


167 


it is a weak parasite (as previously claimed by Atkinson) and 
only attacks plants which are first debilitated by the presence 
of another fungus. The var. nivea (apparently) of N. vasin- 
fecta was found as a wilt disease in the ginseng gardens of 
Missouri. The entrance seems to depend upon an anthracnose 
caused by Vermicularia dematium. 

The Society of American Bacteriologists held the sev¬ 
enth annual meeting at the University of Michigan, Dec. 28-29, 
1905. The report of the secretary, F. P. Gorham in Science N. 

S. 23 :205-221, Feb. 9, 1906, presents a long list of papers and 
abstracts of same — the following seeming to be of systematic 
trend: Lactic Acid Bacteria, W. M. Esten; The Microscopic 
Estimate of Bacteria in Milk, Francis H. Slack; Kinds of Bac¬ 
teria Concerned in Souring Milk, P. G. Heinemann; Bacteria 
of the Root Nodules of the Leguminosae, Karl F. Kellerman and 

T. D. Beckwith. 

Two Mycological articles were read before the Botanical 
Society of America at the New Orleans Meeting, according to 
the report of the Secretary, William Trelease, Science N. S. Vol. 
XXIII, Feb. 9, 1906, pp. 221-2. They were as follows: J. C. 
Arthur, Cultures of Uredineae in 1905; and G. F. Atkinson, The 
Development of Ithyphallus impudicus (L.) Fries, from France. 

Dr. N. M. Glatfelter gives a Preliminary list of Fligher 
Fungi collected in the vicinity of St. Louis, Mo., from 1808 
to 1905 in the Transactions of the Academy of Science at St. 
Louis, Vol. XVI, No. 4. The locality, date of occurrence and 
miscellaneous observations, besides the spore measurements in 
all cases, are given. About 500 species are listed. Amanita has 
12 representatives, Amanitopsis 6, Lepiota 25, Tricholoma 8, 
Clitocybe 16, Pleurotus 8, Collybia 14, Mycena 10, and many 
others are equally well represented. 

The Secretary’s Report (by Francis E. Lloyd) of Sec. G. 
[Botany] American Association for the Advancement of Sci¬ 
ence, New Orleans, gives the following mycological papers (see 
Science N. S. 23 1201-4, Feb. 4, 1906) : Development of Armii- 
laria mellea, and of Agaricus campestris, Geo. F. Atkinson; 
North American Species of Peridermium, J. C. Arthur and F. 
D. Kern. The following were presented at a joint meeting of 
the Section and the American Mycological Society: Some rea - 
sons for desiring a better classification of the Uredinales, J. C. 
Arthur; Uredineae of the Gulf States, S. M. Tracy; North 
American Gill Fungi, F. S. Earle; Lichens and recent con¬ 
ception of Species, Bruce Fink; Cultures of Colletotrichum and 
Gloeosporium, P. H. Rolfs; The Affinities of the Fungus of 
Lolium temulentum, E. M. Freeman; Peridermium cerebrum 
Peck and Cronartium quercuum (Berk.), C. L. Shear; Ramu- 


168 


Jour7ial of Mycology 


[Vol. 12 


laria: An Illustration of the Present Practice in Mycological 
Nomenclature, C. L, Shear; Notes on Pachyma cocos, P. H. 
Rolfs; Penicillium glaucum on Pineapple Fruits, P. H. Rolfs; 
Occurrence of Fusoma parasiticum Tubeuf in this Country, 
Perley Spaulding; Some Peculiar Fungi New to America, W. G. 
Farlow. 

M. Prof. N. Patouillard describes many new species and 
one new genus in the Bulletin de la Societe Mycologique de 
France, Tome XXII, Ier Fascicule, 28 Feb. 1906, pp. 45-62, 
under the title Champignons recueillis par M. Seurat dans la 
Polynesia franqaise. The new genus is Mapea (Uredinaearum) 

— la designation ist tiree du mot Mape, par laquel les indigenes 
Mangareviens designent I’Inocarpus edulis. The diagnosis is 
as follows: “Sori erumpentes, applanati, orbiculares, lati, cera- 
cei, ambitu sinuoso-lobati, undique, fertiles. Sporae (uredo- 

sporae) fuscidulae, ovoideae, verruculosae, stipitae”.M. 

ratiata n. sp.Hab. in fructibus Inocarpi edulis, Roruru, 

Ribitea. 

Melanobasidium is the name of a new genus (Tuberculariees 
Dematiees) proposed by M. A. Maublanc in an article Sur 
quelques especes nouvelles ou peu connues de Champignon in- 
ferieurs, Bulletin de la Societe Mycologique de France, Tome 
XXII, Ier Fascicule, 28 Feb. 1906, The description of the 
genus is as follows: “Foliicolum, maculicolum, sporodochia 
minima, erumpentia, atra, ex hyphis ramosis, septatis, intricatis 
composita, sporophoris cylindracis, densis, septatis, concoloribis 
vestita; conidia solitaria, acrogena, ovoidea, hyalina” . . .M. 

mali n. sp.In foliis vivis Piri mali ad Sevillem, Hispaniae. 

About a dozen new species besides are described. 

What to note in the Macroscopic study of Lichens under the 
subheads: Introductory statement, The Thallus, General forms 
of Thalli, Sizes of Thalli, The surfaces of Thalli, Colors of 
Thalli, is told in the Bryologist, July, 1905; by Bruce Fink. 

The Bulletin de la Societe Mycologique de France, Tome 
XXII, Ier Fascicule contains the following: Ch. Van Bambeke. 

•— De la valeur de l’epispore pour la determination et le groupe- 
ment des especes du genre Lycoperdon; Corfec. — Excursion 
mycologique aux environs de Laval (Mayenne) ; Dr. Baret.— 
Note sur les Champignons vendus sur les marches de Nantes en 
1905; Em. Perrot. — Le Congres international de Botanique a 
Vienne (1905); Peltereau — La Mycologie a l’Exposition de 
Vienne; Em. Boulanger — Note sur la Truffe; N. Patouillard. 

— Champignons recueillis par M. Seurat dans la Polynesie fran- 
qaise. (PI. I et II) ; A. Maublanc. — Sur quelques especes 
nouvelles ou peu connues de Champignons inferieurs. A. Mau¬ 
blanc.— Quelques Champignons de l’Est africain. (Fig. texte) ; 





July 1906] Notes from Mycological Literature 


169 


F. Gueguen. — La moisissure des caves et des celliers; etude 
critique, morphologique et biologique sur le Rhacodium cellare 
Pers. (avec 3 planches,); L. Lutz. — Associations symbio- 
tiques du Saccharomyces Radaisii Lutz; Bibliographic analy- 
tique. 

M. le docteur Baret reports in the Bulletin de la Societe My- 
cologique de France the following list of edible species sold in 
the market of Nantes during the year 1905: Amanita caesarea, 
Lepiota procera, L. rachodes, L. excoriata, L. pudica, Psalfiota 
campestris, P. ammophila, P. arvensis, P. pratensis, P. syl- 
vatica, P. bernardii, Clitopilus orcella, Marasmius oreades, Len- 
tinus tigrinus, Tricholoma personatum, Clitocybe laccata, Bo¬ 
letus edulis, B. aestivalis, B. aereus, B. scaber, B. scaber var. 
auranticus, B. luteus, Fistulina hepatica, Hydnum repandum, 
Craterellus cornucopioides, and Lycoperdon giganteum. 

Bruce Fink’s article in the March No. (1905) of the Bry- 
ologist on How to Collect and Study Lichens, deals fully with 
the subject under the following heads: Introductory, Collect¬ 
ing, Collecting Outfit, Where to Collect, Aids at Home, The 
Study at Home, and the Herbarium. 

Further Notes on Cladonias, V, by Bruce Fink, the Bry- 
ologist, May 1905, deals with Cladonia gracilis (L.) Willd., 
widely distributed over North America, not occurring in the 
southern half of the United States. The varieties which are 
also fully described are dilatata (Hofifm.) Wainio dilacerata 
Flk., chordahs (Flk.) Shaer., aspera Flk., and elongata (Jacq.) 
Flk. 

Lichenology for Beginners is the title of a very instructive 
article by Frederick Leroy Sargent in the May (1905) No. of the 
Bryologist. What these plants are is discussed, then their 
habits, distribution, etc., receive attention with suggestions for 
collecting and taking care of specimens. The second install¬ 
ment is found in the July No.; it is illustrated, fully explaining 
the characters of a Parmelia. 

The Transactions of the British Mycological Society for 
the season 1904, published 13th May 1905, includes the follow¬ 
ing contents: Report of the Whitby Foray and complete list of 
Fungi and Mycetozoa gathered; Eriksson’s recent researches 
on the vegetative life of the Cereal Rust Fungi, by Charles P. 
Plowright; Saccardo’s De diagnostica et nomenclatura myco- 
logica, admonita quaedam; Recent Researches on Parasitism, 
by R. H. Biffen; Corticium (Peniophora) chrysanthemi, by 
Charles B. Plowright, M. D.; Notes on three uncommon Fungi, 
by Cecil H. Sp. Percival; Fungi new to Britain, by Miss A. 
Lorrain Smith F. L. S. and Carleton Rea, B. C. L., M. A. & C. 


170 


Journal of Mycology 


[Vol. 12 


An Index of the Mycological Writings of C. G. Lloyd, Vol. 
I, 1898-1905, [May 1905], Cincinnati, Ohio, U. S. A., is a 
pamphlet of 20 pages. Mr. Lloyd states: I have been working 
on the Gastromycetes for four or five years and have published 
the results as they appealed to me. This is an Index of the 
publications as far as the work has gone. As it is designated as 
Vol. I, “The intention is evident that others are expected to 
follow.” 

G. K. Merrill in Lichen Notes No. 2, see Bryologist for 
January 1906, refers (1) to the recent finding of Umbilicaria 
pustulata papulosa on a lower limb of a young spruce — very re¬ 
markable since the genus Umbilicaria is typically saxicoline; 
and (2) to the finding by Mrs. Agnes Ashworth, Central Point, 
Oregon, inmixed with Evernia vulpina; Mr. Merrill designates 
it Cetraria islandica (L) Ach. M. [modification] arborialis (con¬ 
ditional nomination). 

New Species of Edible Philippine Fungi by Edwin Bing¬ 
ham Copeland, No. 28, July, 1905, Department of the Interior, 
Bureau of Government Laboratories, is a paper with English 
descriptions of several new species of Agarics and a Lycoperdon, 
these being translations of the Latin descriptions of the species as 
published in Annales Mycologici, Vol. 3, No. 1. Two species 
are illustrated by half-tones. The Basidiomycete flora of that 
country is said to be a very rich one in species if not in indi¬ 
viduals. 

In Malpighia Anno. XVIII. Fasc. X-XII, 1904, we find the 
following mycological articles: Dott. Teodoro Ferraris, Enu- 
merazione dei funghi della Valsesia (seri terza)—an extended 
annotated list including the descriptions of twenty-two new 
species, and one page of illustrations; L. Cufino, un secundo 
Contributo alia Flora Micologica della Provincia di Napoli — a 
list of 57 species; L. Cufino, Fungi Magnagutiani — 42 species 
collected in the vicinity of Mantua and Faenza by Count Magna- 
guti. 

New species of Exoascaceae — diagnoses in English of 
Taphrina truncicola Kusano, on Prunus incisa; Taphrina piri 
Kusano, on Pirus miyabei Sargent; and Taphrina japonica, on 
Alnus japonica S. et Z.; by S. Kusano, in the Botanical Maga¬ 
zine, Vol. XIX, Jan. 20th, 1905. 

Ernest S. Salmon reports on the present aspect of the Epi¬ 
demic of the American Gooseberry-Mildew in Europe in the 
Journal of the Royal Horticultural Society, Vol. XXIX, parts 1, 
2 and 3, 1905. This [Sphaerotheca mors-uvae (Schw.) B. & 
C.] was recorded from Ireland in 1900; now it is reported from 
nine localities in six countries: From Russia it is reported from 
ten widely separated districts. The writer calls attention to the 


July 1906 ] Notes from Mycological Literature 


171 


widespread economic loss such a disease as the present one can 
cause. He refers to the history of the Vine-Mildew — appear¬ 
ing in Europe for the first time on hot-house vines at Margate 
in 1845, it s P rea d the next year to hot-houses of that neighbor¬ 
hood. In 1847 it was reported from one locality in France; in 
1848 from several localities in France and Belgium. It spread 
rapidly to other countries. By 1854 the vineyards in France 
were invaded to such an extent that the yield was reduced to 
one-tenth or one-twentieth. Similar to the early stages of this 
history are the circumstances attending the first outbreak of the 
American Gooseberry-Mildew, sec. Mr. Salmon. 

Bulletin No. 85, Bureau of Plant Industry, U. S. Depart¬ 
ment of Agriculture, by B. M. Duggar, treats of the Principles 
of Mushroom Growing and Mushroom Spawn Making. The 
preface states that as an outcome of the work Dr. Duggar has 
already accomplished, spawn of pure-culture origin is now being 
produced on a very large scale by several growers and is giving 
excellent results. This method enables the grower to insure and 
maintain the most desirable varieties of mushroom. 

Fichen Notes, No. 1, by G. K. Merrill, in the November No. 
of the Bryologist (1905), deals with Cladonia verticillata Hoffm., 
or Cladonia gracilis (L.) Nyl. var. verticillata Fr. The various 
North American forms receive extended comment. 

Frederick LeRoy Sargent’s IV and last installment of 
Lichenology for Beginners suggests an ecological study of these 
plants, and then outlines a mode of proceedure preparatory to 
identifying species with the aid of books on the North American 
species — a brief bibliography being given. The article closes 
with a sample Key for about three dozen species. 

On the Nomenclature of Fungi having many fruit-forms, 
Fy J. C. Arthur, in the Plant World, Volume 8, No. 3, March, 
and No. 4, April, 1905, places in clear light the question of 
choosing a name from a number of synonyms. The three stages 
of Wheat Rust, each when first discovered receiving a scientific 
name at the hands of botanists, is taken as an example for illus¬ 
tration. A point of great significance is contained in the follow¬ 
ing quotation: “It was Linneaus’ great contribution to nomen¬ 
clature that he restricted names to two terms, one generic and 
the other specific. By this change he did not eliminate the de¬ 
scriptive idea embodied in the name, but he did superpose the 
appellative idea He then proceeds to show that a name applies 
to the whole species, to all its variation in aspect, to every mem- 
Fer of the species, and to each individual in all its stages of de¬ 
velopment, and in all its structural parts. Issue is taken with 
Magnus and Saccardo, and the contention is fortified that there is 
no objection to placing the Uredineae, and all other fungi, under 


172 


Journal of Mycology 


LVol. 12 


the same laws for nomenclature as are found serviceable for 
other plants, that is to say, the earliest name applied to a species 
is to be retained, even if given to an imperfect form or early 
stage in the cycle of development. 

Professor George F. Atkinson gives in the Plant World 
for September and October, 1905, Outlines for the observation of 
some of the more common Fungi, such as Black Mould, Downy 
Mildews, White Rust, True Rusts, the Smuts, Puffballs, Earth - 
stars, Agarics, Ink-caps, Amanitas, Lepiotas, Polypori, Boleti, 
Clavarias, Helvellas, Powdery Mildews, and the Black Fungi. 

Melville T. Cook gives a very full (popular) account of 
plant diseases caused by parasitic fungi (and insects) in Cuba 
for the past year in his Informe del Departmento de Patologia 
Vegetal, the article constituting pp. 147-207 inclusive of the Primer 
Informe Anual de la Estacion Central Agronomica de Cuba, 1904- 
5. Some of the species especially mentioned are Colletotrichum 
gleosporioides Penzig, Cladosporium elegans Penzig, Ophi- 
onectria coccicola E. & E., Ustilago zeae (Beckm.) Ung., Puc- 
cinia sorghi Schw., Cercospora gossypina Cke. (esta reconocido 
como el primer estado de Mycosphaerella gossypina [Cke.] 
Earle), Melanconium sacchari, Leptosphaeria sacchari, Cerco¬ 
spora personata (B. & C.) Ellis, Uromyces arachnidis P. Henn., 
Uredo fici Cast., Septoria licopersici Speg., Cladosporium fulvum 
Cke., Phyllosticta hortorum. 

F. S. Earle, under the title Algunos ITongos Cubanos, in 
Primer Informe Anual de la Estacion Central Agronomico de 
Cuba, D225-246, I Junio 1906, gives diagnosis in Spanish of the 
following new Cuban species: Pocillaria [Lentinus] reflexa, Po. 
vestida, Po. cinnamomea, Po. palmeri, Po. simulans, Phyllotus 
[Pleurotus] imbricatus, Ph. hygrophanus, Geopetalum [Pleuro- 
tus] eugeniae, Ge. album, Ge. brunescens, Crepidotus [Pleuro¬ 
tus] lentinoides, Galera simulans, Ga. grisea, Ga. cubensis, Gym- 
nochilus [Hypholoma] flocculosus, Gy. campestris, Gy. musae, 
Gy. roystoniae, Gy. caespitosus Stropharia cubensis, Str. floc- 
cosa, Pholiotina [Pholiota] musae, and Pholiota cubenses. 
These are preceded by half a dozen pages of general discussion of 
the group and particularly of the work on the Cuban Fungi to 
date. The first publication was by Montague in 1842, who noted 
113 species. Charles Wright from 1856 to 1867 collected some 
fungi which were examined by Dr. M. A. Custer, who sent part 
of them to Rev. J. M. Berkley. This was the basis of the Fungi 
cubensis, 1859, in the Journal of the Linnaean Society. Late 
collectors named are L. M. Underwood, W. A. Murrill and F. 
S. Earle. 

The Articles in Annales Mycologici, Vol. IV, No. 3, Juni 
1906, are: Legarde, J., Contribution a l’Etude des Discomvcetes 


July 1906] Notes from Mycological Literature 


173 


charnus; Rehm, PI., Zum Studium der Pyrenomyceten Deutsch- 
lands, Deutsch-Osterreichs und der Schweiz; Saccardo, P. A., 
Notae Mycologicae; Neger, F. W., Kleinere mycologische Be- 
obachtungen; Hoehnel, Franz V. and Litschauer, Victor, Re¬ 
vision der Corticiceen in Dr. J. Schroter’s “Pilze-Schlesiens” nach 
seiner Herbar examplaren; Schorstein, Josepf, Sporenkeimung 
in Somete-losing: Neue Literatur. 

The Bulletin de la Societe Mycologique de France, Tome 
XXII — 2er Fascicule, presents this sommaire: L. Dolland. — 
Observations sur le Mycenastrum Corium Desv. et sur le Bovista 
plumbea Pers. (PI. VI); N. Patouillard et P. Hariot.— Fun- 
gorum novorum Decas secunda; A. de Jackzewski. — Notes phy- 
topathologiques: Alternaria Grossulariae n. sp. et Colletotrichum 
Grossulariae n. sp.; Paul Vuillemin. — Un nouveau genre de 
Mucedinees: Hemispora stellata (PI. VII); G. Bainier — My- 
cotheque de l’Fcole de Pharmacie, III (PI. VIII) ; Mycotheque 
de l’Rcole de Pharmacie, IV (PI. IX) ; Em. Boulanger. — Germi¬ 
nation de la spore echinulee de la Truffe; F. Gueguen. — La 
moisissure des caves et des celiers; etude critique, morphologique 
et biologique sur le Rhacodium cellare Pers. (Fin) ; X. Gillot.— 
Nouveaux tableaux scolaires de Champignons. — Notes toxi- 
mycologiques ; M. Barbier. — Empoisonnement par TEntoloma 
lividum. Ant. Magnin. — Les expositions mycologiques de Be- 
sancon. P. A. Saccardo. — Note sur les Herbiers mycologiques. 
Index bibliographique des travaux mycologiques parus en 
France et a l’etranger pendant l’annee 1904. 

A. P. Morgan's North American Species of Marasmius, 
publishd in the Journal of Mycology for September and Novem¬ 
ber 1905 (vol. 11) and January 1906 (vol. 12) “is an attempt at 
an orderly arrangement of the species thus far enumerated in 
North America, including the West India Islands. It is only an 
endeavor to get together the scattered species so that some crit¬ 
ical study of them may be made; hence the descriptions of the 
different authors are given as written and there is no indication 
of the synonyms which undoubtedly occur to some extent.” He 
says these are small or minute Agarics, growing for the most 
part upon wood or among the dead leaves in woods; they are 
easily dried in good shape and make elegant specimens for the 
herbarium. The species are numerous, especially abounding in 
the forests of tropical regions. More than 500 species are listed 
in Saccardo’s Sylloge, and Prof. Morgan includes 162 species as 
North American in this preliminary monograph. They are 
grouped under sections; these again are ranged in divisions, 
under which usually one or more sets of synoptical descriptive 
head-lines are given, thus practically furnishing a useful key 
for convenience in identifying the species. The parts have been 
issued as a Separate, bound together as one pamphlet. 


174 


Journal of Mycology 


[Vol. 12 


A Bulletin (No. 163, California Agricultural Experi¬ 
ment Station, Dec. 1904) by Ralph E. Smith is devoted to 
Pear Scab (Fusicladium pirinum Lib.), being an illustrated popu¬ 
lar account, with economic notes. 

A Rust-Resisting Cantaloupe forms Bulletin 104, Col¬ 
orado Agricultural Experiment Station, November 1905. The 
“rust” referred to is Macrosporium cucumerinum E. & E. 

B. O. Longyear published An Apple Rot due to an un¬ 
described species of Alternaria as Bulletin 105, November 1905, 
Colorado Agr. Exp. Station. Besides the general account, the 
microscopical characters are given in detail and in figures. 

D. R. SuMSTINE GIVES A BRIEF NOTE ON WYNNEA AmERI- 
cana with new description of specimen collected at Ohio Pyle, 
Pa. See Journal of Mycology, March 1906. 

Second Supplement to New Genera of Fungi published 
since the year 1900, with citation and original description is given 
by P. L. Ricker in Journal of Mycology, March and May, cover¬ 
ing 14 pages. This, like the first installment of the compilation, 
gives the genera in alphabetical order under the eight large groups 
of fungi. 

Plant Diseases in 1905, by W. A. Orton, Yearbook U. S. 
Dept. Agr. 1905 ; 602-611, 1906, is a resume of plant disease 
compiled from reports of field observations by agents of the De¬ 
partment and officers of Experiment Stations. It indicates briefly 
the prevalence of the diseases in 1905 as compared with con¬ 
ditions in previous years. The diseases indicated by common 
names and the scientific name of the causative organism are 
grouped as heretofore under Pome Fruits; Stone Fruits; Small 
Fruits; Tropical Fruits; Vegetable and Field Crops; Cereals; 
Forage Crops; Fiber Plants; Nut, Forest, and Shade Trees; 
Greenhouse and Ornamental Plants. 

The Verticillieae, and Gonatobotrytideae are finished 
and the Hyalodidymae begun by Prof. Dr. Lindau in Raben- 
horst’s Kryptogamen-Flora, Erster Band, VIII Abteilung, Pilze, 
97. Lieferung, 20 June 1905. 

In RabenhorsPs Kryptogamen-Flora, I. Bd., VIII Abt., 
Pilze, 98. Lieferung, 15 Juli 1905, the Hyalodidymae are com¬ 
pleted, and the Hyalophragmiae are carried to the Genus Ramu- 
laria. 

Two articles occupy the April No. (Vol. IV) of the 
Annales Mycologici, namely: Fr. Bubak, Neue oder Kritische 
Pilze [second instalment, mostly new species, nos. 15-57] an d J* 
Lagarde, Contribution a l’Etude des Discomycetes charnus. 

M. Paul Vuellimin gives the nouveau genre de Muce- 
dinees : Hemispora stellata in the Bulletin trimestrial de la So- 


July 1906] Notes from Mycological Literature 


175 


ciete Mycologique de France, tome XXII, 2er Fascicule, 15 May 
1906. The new species H. stellata was found on the inferior face 
of a crust of Aspergillus repens. The diagnosis of the genus 
is as follows: Hemispora n. g. — Mycelium de Mucidinee-Ma- 
cronemee abondant, hyalin, fin, cloisonne, ramifie, Tubes fertiles, 
ramifies a la base. Chaque rameau conidiophore se termine par 
une vesicule (protoconidie) precedee d’un etranglement annu- 
laire a paroi epaissie, brune, rigide. La vesicule se transforme, en 
tout ou en partie, en une serie de segments sporiformes (deutero- 
conidies). Parfois elle s’allonge en un nouveau conidiophore ou 
emet des ramifications susceptibles de se comporter de meme. 

A part of the Botrytideae is included in the 95th Liefer- 
ung of Rabenhorst’s Kryptogamen-Flora, VIII Abt., Pilze, G. 
Lindau, issued 3 April 1905. The genera are numerous — Ovu- 
laria perhaps being the largest, having 50 or more species. 

In Notae Mycologicae, Auctore P. A. Saccardo, Annales 
Mycologici, 4:273-8, Juni 1906, three new genera and many new 
species are described. The new genus Endothiella represents the 
pycnidium of Endothia; Endothiella gyrosa n. sp. is the type. 
Muchmoria represents a new genus Dematiacearum, the new 
species (M. portoricensis) occurs in rimis corticis arboris emor- 
tuae indet. pr. Signal Tower Hill, Ponce, Porto Rico (Rev. L. J. 
Muchmore). Fairmania belongs to the Sphaeroidaceae—“prae- 
cipue forma peculiari sporulae, soleae calcaneum exacte orni- 
tantis, ab Epithyrio subgenere Coniothyrii dignoscitur. 

In Lieferungen 96 (Rabenhorst's Kryptogamen-Flora, 
Pilze, G. Lindau, issued 10 May 1905), the Botrytideae are fin¬ 
ished. There are enumerated between four and five dozen species 
of Botrytis. These are arranged under the sub-genera Eubotry- 
tis, Polyactis, Phymatotrichum and Cristatella. 

Hedwigia, Band XLV, Heft 3, 28 March 1906, contains 
two articles to be listed here, namely: Theodor Brandt, Beitrage 
zur Anatomischen Kenntnis der Flechtengattung Ramalina; and 
P. Magnus, Uropyxis rickiana P. Magn. und die von ihr hervor- 
gebrachte Krebsgeschwulst. 

P. Magnus gives an extended account of Uropyxis 
rickiana n. sp. und die von ihr hervorgebrachte Krebsge¬ 
schwulst, Hedwigia 45:173-177, PI. IX, 28 Mar. 1906. The 
species was found in Brazil by Prof. J. Rick on some Bignonia- 
ceae. “Die Gattung Uropyxis ist bisher in verhaltnismassig wen- 
igen Arten bekannt. . . . Mit Ausnahme der afrikanischen Uro¬ 
pyxis Steudneri P. Magn. und der asiatischen Ur. Fraxini 
(Kom.) P. Magn. stammen sie alle aus Amerika und treten dort 
zwei Gruppen von Uropxis-Arten auf Leguminoseen und auf 
Berberis auf. Zu ihnen tritt nun als dritte amerikanische Gruppe 
Uropyxis rickiana P. Magn. auf einer Bignoniaceae, und sicher 


176 


Journal of Mycology 


LVol. 12 


werden sich noch mehr Uropyxis-Arten in Amerika nachweisen 
lassen. Das sudlichere Amerika scheint ein Zentrum der Gattung 
Uropyxis zu sein.” 

A Contribution to a Revision of the North American 
Hydnaceae forms Vol. 12 of the Memoirs of the Torrey Bo¬ 
tanical Club, issued 13 June 1906, author Howard James Banker. 
The area covered includes the continent of North America and 
its adjacent Islands north of the Isthmus of Panama. Of the 
500 known species not more than 200 have been found in our 
region. Dr. Banker’s synopsis of genera shows, the following 
names: Hydnum, Hericium, Steccherinum, Echinodontium, 
Sarcodon, Hydnellum, Phellodon, Leaia, Auriscalpium, Grandini- 
odes. The monograph contains full descriptions, ample notes 
and keys. The new species here proposed are as follows: 
Hericium fimbriatum, Steccherinum morgani, St. adustulum, Sar¬ 
codon reticulatus, Sarcodon underwoodii, Hydnellum nuttallii, 
Hydnellum complicatum, Hydnellum earlianum, Phellodon ellisi- 
anus and Leaia piperata. Two new genera are Leaia (Hydnum 
stratosum Berkeley, 1845), an d Grandinioides (Hydnum flavum 
[Swartz 1835] Berkeley 1843). This important monograph also 
includes a Bibliography of 11 pages. 

A lengthy list of parasitic fungi collected near Triberg 
in August 1905 is given by Otto Jaap in the Botanische Zeit- 
schrift, No. 7-8, August 1906, under the title Ein Kleiner Beitrag 
zur Pilzflora des Schwartzwaldes. He regards as of especial in¬ 
terest the following: Dothidella geranii, auf Geranium silvati- 
cum, Melampsorella blechni, Puccinia chrysosplenii, auf chryso- 
splenium oppositifolium, Phoma sagittalis n. sp. auf Cytisus 
sagittalis, Actinomena podograriae, Ramularia prenanthis n. sp., 
Cercosporella magnusiana auf Geranium silvaticum, und Passa- 
lora bacilligera var. alnobetulae n. var. auf Alnus alnobetula. 

A list of about 3 dozen species and description of Poly- 
porus fagicola n. sp. is given by William A. Murrill in the Febru¬ 
ary No. of Torreya (1906). The collections were made in Au¬ 
gust and September 1905. The new species was found on the 
top of a fallen decorticated beech log in heavy mixed woods on the 
slope of Boarstone Mountains, Piscataquis Co., Maine. It has 
the habit of Polyporus polyporus. 

A STUDY OF THE DEVELOPMENT OF ASCUS AND SPORE FORMS 
in Ascomycetes by J. Horace Faull is published in the Proceed¬ 
ings of the Boston Society of Natural History, vol. 32, No. 4, 
June 1905. No full report can here be given, but the eleventh 
item in this summary is as follows: The evidence points to the 
conclusion that while the ascus has probably not been derived 
from the sporangium of the Mucorineae, the phenomena of spore 
formation are not incompatible with the view that homologizes 


July 1906] 


Notes from Mycological Literature 


177 


the ascus with the zoosporangium, nor with the view that the 
Ascomycetes have originated from some such Phycomycetous 
group as the Peronosporineae or Saprolegniineae, an affinity first 
suggested by de Bary on the basis of sexuality. 

The VIII Abtheilung, Erster Band, Rabenhorst's 
Kryptogamen-Flora contains the first installment of Hyphy- 
mycetes by G. Lindau, issued May 16, 1904. The general system 
used by Saccardo is here followed and the first pages of descrip¬ 
tions (beginning with Sarcinomyces, pertain to the Chromo- 
sporieae, a section of the Hyalosporae of the family Mucedinaceae. 
The descriptions of the species are rather brief, some notes are 
added especially in case of important pathogenic species and 
occasional figures in the text are given. Greater convenience 
would accrue had the generic name, especially when the species 
are very numerous, been repeated in full instead of being indi¬ 
cated by the initial letter, or better yet the full name repeated at 
the top of successive pages. 

Many genera, some with a large number of species, e. g. 
of Oidium (which are listed and described though noted in some 
cases as conidial forms of certain Ascomycetous species) are given 
by G. Lindau in 93. Lieferung, Ester Band, VIII Abtheilung of 
Rabenhorst’s Kryptogamen-Flora (pp. 65-128), issued 30 June 
1904. Cephalosporium charticolum is described as a new species, 
and Eidamia is established as a new genus of the Aspergilleae. 

P. A. Saccardo gives Micromycetes americani novi — 
Mycetes boreali-americani a Doct. Fairman lecti (11 new species) 
and Mycetes Mexicana a Doct. S. Bonansea lecti (5 new species) 
— in the Journal of Mycology, March 1906. The diagnoses, 
notes, etc., are in Latin. 

Prof. Dr. F. Bubak describes ii new species of North 
American fungi and one new genus under the title of Einige 
Neue Pilze aus Nord America, Journal of Mycology, March 
1906. The new genus is as follows: Pseudostegia Bubak n. g. 
Melanconiacearum. The type species is P. nubilosa, Lexington, 
Kv., on leaves of Carex sp. — “Ein sehr interessanter Pilz, 
welcher mit meiner neuen Gattung Anaphysomene (Annales 
Mycologici 1906) verwandt ist. . . . “Es ist moglich, dass er als 
Konidienstadium zu Stegia caricis Peck (welche aber mit Stegia 
subvelata Rehm identisch ist) gehort. Es scheint mir dann 
weiter, dass Cryptosporium nubilosum Ell. et Ev. mit meinem 
Pilze identisch ist, denn ich vermute, dass die Breite der sporen 
nur durch einen Druckfehler statt 2.5/A-8.5/A angegeben ist. Sollte 
meine Vermutung zutriffen, dann musste der vorliegende Pilz 
Preudostegia nubilosa (Ell. et Ev.) Bubak genannt werden.” 

Ernst A. Bessey notes, in the Jouurnal of Mycology 
for March 1906, the occurrence in this country of Dilophospora 


178 Journal of Mycology [Vol. 12 

alopecuri (Fr.) Fr. It was found on leaves of Calamagrostis 
canadensis among galls caused by nematodes. 

Pleurotus Hollandianus sp. nov. by D. R. Sumstine is 
diagnosed in Latin, in the March (1906) No. of the Journal of 
Mycology. It is P. petaloidei affnis sed forma tomento pilei, 
latitudine lamellarum differt; collected on rotten trunks, La- 
trobe, Pa. 

Rust notes for 1905, ry J. M. Bates, Journal of Mycology, 
March 1906. Records of cultures are given — April 6, Puccinia 
subnitens on Monolepis nuttalliana (some ripe aecidia noticed on 
May 12 but more on accompanying Roripa sinuata and Bursa 
bursa-pastoris) ; cultures also made on Sophia incisa — Lepidi- 
um apetalum also a good host. Culture of Puccinia amphigena 
on Smilax hispida — the latter covered with aecidia June 10. 
An Oenothera biennis with ripe aecidia covering the under side 
(hence not Aec. Peckii) associated with Carex pennsylvanica 
with uredo; elsewhere same was secured also III “which looks 
like a pale weak uredo” — pointing toward genetic connection 
and a new species. 

The articles in the Journal of Mycology for May 1906 
are the following: Shear, Peridermium cerebrum Peck and Cro- 
nartium Quercuum (Berk) ; Morgan, North Ameican Species 
of Heliomyces; Ricker, Second Supplement to New Genera 
(Concluded); Kellerman, Index to North American Mycology; 
Kellerman, Notes from Mycological Literature, XIX. 

The table of Contents of the Journal of Mycology, 
March 1906, is as follows: Kellerman,Obituary,J. B. Ellis; Bates, 
Rust Notes for 1905; Saccardo, Micromycetes Americani Novi; 
Bubak, Neue Pilze aus Nord Amerika; Bessey, Dilophospora 
Alopecuri; Sumstine, Pleurotus Hollandianus Sp. Nov.; Sum¬ 
stine, Note on Wynnea Americana; Ricker, Second Supplement 
to New Genera; Kellerman, Index to North American Mycol¬ 
ogy ; Kellerman, Notes from Mycological Literature XVIII; 
Shear, American Mycology Society. 

The Tylostomeae by C. G. Lloyd, Cincinnati, Ohio, U. S. 
A., February 1906, pp. 1-28, Plates 74-85. Descriptions and 
abundance of figures (half tones). As treated they embrace all 
Gastromycetes with dry spores, having peridia borne on distinct 
stalks that are not prolonged as axes. As thus defined [the au¬ 
thor continues] it is a very natural tribe of Pufifballs,” differing 
from the Podaxineae which also have the peridia borne on stalks 
which, however, are continuous as axes of the gleba to the apices 
of the peridia. The genera he arranges as follows: 

Peridium without definite mouth, 


Volva none.Oueletia. 

Volva thick, permanent .Dictyocephalos. 

Volva not permanent.Schizostoma. 





July 1906] Notes from Mycological Literature 


179 


Peridium opening circumscissily, 

Gleba with capillitium and “annulated cells”.Battarrea. 

Gleba without these charcters.Battarreopsis. 

Peridium with definite mouths, 

Peridium seated on the broad apex of the 

stipe .Chlamydopus. 

Stipe inserted into a socket at base of pe¬ 
ridium .Tylostoma. 

By the aid of grants from the Carnegie Institution of 
Washington, Edgar W. Olive carried on investigations which are 
published in the March and April Nos. of the Botanical Gazette, 
1906, under the title Cytological Studies on the Entomophthora- 
ceae: I. The Morphology and Development of Empusa [A new 
species is described, namely Empusa sciarae Olive n. sp.] ; II. 
Nucleae and Cell Divisions of Empusa. Plate XIV, XV and XVL 

John L. Sheldon discusses The Ripe Rot or Mummy 
Disease of Guavas, as Bulletin 104, W. Va. Agr. Exp. Station,, 
April 1, 1906. The disease was noticed in the greenhouses of 
the U. S. Department of Agriculture and a thorough study was 
made, also cultures and inoculations of apples and plums exe¬ 
cuted. The fungus proved to be Gloeosporium psidii G. Del. — 
a new species described by Delacroix a few months earlier. The 
ascigerous stage was found by Prof. Sheldon “corresponding in 
nearly every particular to the genus GlomerellaL Accordingly 
the new name is given as follows: Glomereila psidii (G. Del.) 
Sheldon n. n. 

Under the title of A Culture Medium for the Zygo¬ 
spores of Mucor stolonifer J. I. Hamaker, says (in Science, May 
4, 1906 — N. S. Vol. 23, p. 710), that Zygospores may be readily 
secured with proper conditions of moisture and temperature, — 
using as a substratum corn muffin bread; the atmosphere should 
be saturated and the temperature about 70° F. 

The 99. Lieferung (Fungi Imperfecti, Hyphomycetes) 
of Rabenhorst’s Kryptogamen-Flora Erster Band, VIII Abteilung, 
by G. Lindau, 25 July 1906, pp. 433-512, continues but does not 
complete the species of Ramularia. The following are new 
species: R. dianthi Lindau on Dianthus carthusianorum, R. epi- 
lobii rosei Lindau on Epilobium roseum, R. imperatoriae Lindau 
on Imperatoria ostruthium, and R. tozziae Lindau on Tozzia al- 
pina. 

The Genera Aspergillus and Penicillum constitute the 
bulk of the 94th Lieferung of Rabenhorst’s Krypogamen-Flora, 
VIII Abteilung, pp. 129-176, G. Lindau, 15 July 1904. Very full 
notes are given of some of the important species. The 33 species 
of Penicillium are divided into 4 sections according to color. As 
an appendix to these Dr. Lindau enumerates 23 additional species 





180 Journal of Mycology [Vol. 12 

of Dierckx obtained by cultures but not fully coordinated with 
the previously published forms. 

The articles in Bulletin de la Societe Mycologique 
de France, Tome XXI, 2er Fascicule are as follows: M. Boudier, 
nouvelles especes de Chamignons de France (PI. 3) ; P. Vuille- 
min, Seuratia pinicola, sp. nov. (PI. 4) ; N. Patouillard, Rol- 
landina, nouveau genre de Gymnoascees (PL 5) ; N. Patouillard 
et P. Flariot, Fungorum novorum Decas prima; Maublanc, 
Especes nouvelles; Maublanc, Trichoseptoria fructigena; F. 
•Gueguen. Homologie et evolution du Dictyosporium toruloides 
(pi. 8 et 9) ; V. Harlay, Empoisonnement par Y Amanita phal- 
loides, a Flize (Ardennes). 

Ralph E. Smith has prepared a Bulletin (California 
Agr. Exp. Station, Bulletin No. 165, pp. 1-99, January 1905) on 
Asparagus and Asparagus Rust in California which “represents 
primarily a report to certain asparagus growers, canners and deal¬ 
ers of San Francisco, Sacramento, and adjoining territory, who 
provided a fund of $2,500 for the support of an investigation 
of the Asparagus Rust, a disease which seriously threatened to 
destroy or greatly injure their industry.” The main topics are: 
The Asparagus Rust; History of the Disease in California; 
Nature of the Rust; Cause; The Mycelium; Spore Forms; Na¬ 
ture of the Injury; Amount of Loss; Yearly Life-History; Re¬ 
lation of Natural Condition of the Rust; and the Prevention or 
Control of Asparagus Rust; Rust Parasites. Under the last 
topic are mentioned the Darluca ilium Cast., Tubercularia per- 
sicina Ditt., Cladosporium sp. — “shows no structural difference 
from the ordinary Clad, herbarum Link, a very indefinite species.” 

Diseases of the Apple, Cherry, Peach, Pear and Plum, 
forms Bulletin No. 132, Alabama Agr. Exp. Station, April 1905, 
E. Mead Wilcox — popular accounts for fruit-growers. 

An extended study of the Chemotropism of the Fungi 
by Harry R. Fulton, in the Botanical Laboratory of the Univer¬ 
sity of Missouri, is publishd in the Feb. No. of the Botanical Ga¬ 
zette, 1906. 

J. C. Arthur gives an extended review of Sydow’s Mono- 
graphia Uredinearum with notes upon the Ameican species in 
the January No. of the Journal of Mycology, 1905. “One is 
naturally surprised to find that just twice as many endemic species 
are credited to America as are found in Europe. One-fourth 
of all the species inhabit the Compositae and one-eighth of them 
occur on the Gramineae.” We give a list of those that should be 
made synonyms: 

Puccinia cornigera E. & E. should be made a synonym of P. 
actinellae (Webb.) Syd. 

Puccinia longipes Lagh. should be made a synonym of P. 
vernoniae Schw. 


July 1906] Notes from Mycological Literature 


181 


Puccinia aplopappi Syd. should be made a synonym of P. 
tuberculans E. & E. 

Puccinia similis E. & E. should be made a synonym of P. 
absinthii DC. 

Puccinia recondita D. & H. should be made a synonym of P. 
conferta D. & H. 

Puccinia magnoecia E. & E. should be made a synonym of P. 
asteris Duby. 

Puccinia inclusa Syd. should be made a synonym of P. cirsii 
Lasch. 

Puccinia californica Diet, should be made a synonym of P. 
cirsii Lasch. 

Puccinia confluens Syd. should be made a synonym of P. 
erigerontis E. & E. 

Puccinia gutierreziae E. & E. should be made a synonym of 
P. grindeliae Pk. 

Puccinia lagophyllae D. & H. should be made a synonym of 
P. hemizoniae E. & T. 

Puccinia nardosmiae E. & E. should be made a synonym of 
conglomerata (Str.) K. & S. 

Puccinia tracyi Sacc. & Syd. should be made a synonym of 
P. solidaginis Pk. 

Puccinia philibertiae E. & E. should be made a synonym of 
P. gonolobi Rav. 

Puccinia cymopteri D. & H. should be made a synonym of P. 
jonesii Pk. 

Puccinia asperior E. & E. should be made a synonym of P. 
jonesii Pk. 

Puccinia microica Ellis should be made a synonym of P. 
cryptotaeniae Pk. 

Puccinia lindrothii Syd. should be made a synonym of P. 
jonesii Pk. 

Puccinia sphaelerocondra Lindr. should be made a synonym 
of P. jonesii Pk. 

Puccinia thompsonii Hume should be made a synonym of P. 
sambuci (Schw.) Arth. 

Puccinia omnivora E. & E. should be made a synonym of P. 
windsoriae Schw. 

Puccinia procera D. & H. should be made a synonym of P. 
montanensis Ellis. 

Puccinia substerilis E. & E. should be made a synonym of P. 
stipae Arth. 

Puccinia bakeriana Arth. should be made a synonym of P. 
ellisii DeT. 

Some of the contentions of Edward Read Memminger 
under the title of Agaricus amygdalinus M. A. C. (see Journal of 
Mycology, Jan. 1905) are as follows: “As far as our research 
shows, Agaricus amygdalinus has never been technically de- 


182 


Journal of Mycology 


[Vol. 12 


scribed, and the first appearance of the name in print was in 
Curtis’s List of the Fungi in the Geological and Natural His¬ 
tory Survey of North Carolina published in 1867. It is not sur¬ 
prising, therefore, that so little being known. . . We think it 

susceptible of proof, that this plant was first published by Curtis 
as Agaricus fabaceus Berk., then this determination not proving 
satisfactory, it was united by Ravenel with Ag. campestris Linn.; 
dissatisfaction still existing it was finally segregated as Agaricus 
amygdalinus by Curtis. . . . From the foregoing it would 

seem that the geographical distribution of Ag. amygdalinus 
would be from Massachusetts to Texas. . . . Until, therefore, 
it is conclusively proved that Ag. amygdalinus and Ag. fabaceus 
are one and the same species, it is proper to confine the descrip¬ 
tion to Ag. fabaceus strictly to the words of Berkeley, and no 
argument for the identity of these species, based on similarity 
of taste and odor, drawn from Curtis’s statement in Silliman’s 
Journal, above quoted, can have any weight or force.” 

The Index to North American Mycology, which is an 
alphabetical list of articles, authors, subjects, new species and 
hosts, new names and synonyms, by W. A. Kellerman appeared 
in instalments in 1905 in the May, July, and September No.’s of 
the Journal of Mycology. This comprehensive index includes 
everything in its scope that has appeared since the end of the 
year 1900. Each instalment is printed as a separate — on one 
side of the page only so that it may be cut and pasted on cards 
making a convenient library card index. 

J. C. Arthur’s Cultures of Uredineae in 1905, being the 
sixth of a series of reports by the author upon the cultures of 
plant rusts, gives (see Journal of Mycology, Jan. 1906) an ac¬ 
count of 194 sowings of spores, representing 45 species of rusts, 
and for that purpose 100 species of hosts were utilized which 
were grown temporarily in pots in the greenhouse. The sum¬ 
mary shows that 20 successful cultures were made with species 
previously reported, and 10 with species now reported for the 
first time. The latter are as follows: 1. Puccinia silphii Schw. 

— Resting teleutospores from Silphium integrifolium Michx. 

sQwn on same host; 2. Puccinia grindeliae Pk. — Resting teleu¬ 

tospores from Gutierrezia sarothrae (Pursh) B. & R. sown on 
same host; 3. Puccinia solidaginis Pk. — Resting teleutospores 

from Solidago trinervata Greene, sown on S. Canadensis L.; 4. 
Puccinia transformans E. & E. — Resting teleutospores from 
Stenolobium Stans (L.) Don. sown on same host; 5. Puccinia 
kuhniae Schw.—Teleutospores from Kuhnia eupatorioides L. 
sown on same host; 6. Puccinia canaliculata (Schw.) Lagerh. 

— Aecidiospores from Xanthium canadense Mill, sown on Cy- 

perus esculentis L.; 7. Puccinia eleocharidis Arth. — Teleuto¬ 

spores from Eleocharis palustris (L.) R. & S. sown on Eupa- 


July 1906] Notes from Mycological Literature 


183 


torium perfoliatum L. 8. Puccinia substerilis E. & E. — Am- 
phispores from Stipa viridula Trin. sown on the same host; 9. 
Puccinia seymouriana Arth. — Teleutospores from Spartina 
cynosuroides Willd. sown on Cephalanthus occidentals L.; 10. 

Uromyces acuminatus Arth.—Teleutospores from Spartina cyno¬ 
suroides Willd. sown on Steironema ciliatum (L. ) Raf. 

Fred. J. Seaver describes a new species of Sphaerosoma 
[S. echinulatum] in the Journal of Mycology, Jan. 1905. The 
plant was collected on the surface of damp soil between the tufts 
of grass in an open place on the margin of the woods. It is illus¬ 
trated by a full page plate. 

A Disease of Black Oaks caused by Polyporus obtusus 
Berk, is presented by Perley Spaulding in the 16th Annual Re¬ 
port of the Missouri Botanical Garden, 1905. The species is 
American — not very generally known — and Mr. Spaulding has 
found it causing disease locally in Missouri and northern Arkan¬ 
sas. It is a true saprophyte. The rot extends up and down in 
the heart wood until the tree is so weakened that it breaks over 
or dies outright. It was found that the sporophores were grow¬ 
ing out of the entrances of burrows made by some wood-boring 
insects. Three half-tone plates illustrate the species and two 
illustrate the insects burrows. 


Through inadvertancy a cut to appear on p. 56 was omitted, 
the same being inserted below: 


Pseudostegia nubilosa Bubak. — Radialer Schnitt: ep, deckelartig 
aufgehobene Epidermis mit den Scheiteln der dekapitierten Zelien; b 
Borsten; h, Hyphostroma; m Mycel. (240/1). 













Journal of Mtcofogt 

A Periodical Devoted to North American Mycology. Issued Pi- 
monthly; January, March, May, July, September and November 
Price, $2.00 per Year. "To Foreign Subscribers $2.25. Edited and 

Published by ^ ^ KELLERMAN, PH. D., COLUMBUS, OHIO. 


EDITOR'S NOTES. 

An inspection of a number of Botanical Periodicals reveals 
the fact that the exact date of issue is usually printed in the same 
No., sometimes on the last page, in other cases on the cover; very 
few Journals fail to do this but instead give this date in the 
next issue. It would seem then generally feasible to have the 
date of issue accompany the No. to which it pertains. There 
could be no question as to the desirability, we might for practical 
purposes (at least for convenience) say the necessity of doing so. 

Periodicals are intended, as indicated by their pagination, 
volume numbering, index, etc., to be bound at the close of cer¬ 
tain periods; then the query comes why should the number of 
the issue be printed on the first page or any other page of the 
issue; according to our judgment this should be given on the 
cover only. It is a temporary convenience to the librarian or to 
the subscriber, and is no advantage when the No.’s, or parts, are 
bound into a volume. In fact it then is often a disadvantage, 
particularly in making a citation, because one must stop to de¬ 
termine whether that item needs .to be given. 


In order that a reader or indexer may orient himself readily 
and continuously, it is desirable that when the periodical is open 
at any and all parts he may see the page number (at the top, 
extreme left and extreme right), the name of the Journal (on 
the left), title of article (on right), the volume number and the 
date-designation; in addition some periodicals give the author 
of the article. Even if then a signature, or single leaf, becomes 
accidentally displaced, it can be restored quickly and without 
possible error. 

An extremely small almost negligible fraction of even one 
per cent, of readers, desire the date of issue of any periodical as 
opposed to its ordinary date-designation, as January, March, 1st 
Quarter of 1906, etc. However, I would make this matter per¬ 
haps stronger than stated in the preceeding No., where I sug¬ 
gested that it “might be desirable” to give the date of issue in 
addition to the date-designation of the No., Part, Heft, Liefer- 
ung, etc. Thus for an example: Sydow, H. et P. Neue und 
kritische Uredineen — IV. Ann. Mycolog. 4:28-32, Feb. 1906. 
[Issued 5 Apr. 1906.] 


Journal of Mycology, Vol. 12, pp. 136-184, Issued September 29, 1906. 









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Volume 12 , No. 85 September igo6 


Journal of Mycology 


TABLE OF CONTENTS 


If Kellerman — A New Plowrightia from Guatemala.185 

l^L Arthur — A New Classification of the Uredinales. 188 

Bain and Essary —A New Anthracnose of Alfalfa and Red Clover.. 192 
T ) Atkinson — Two New Species belonging to Naucoria and Stropharia 193 

Morgan — North American Species of Lepiota (continued) . 195 

, Hedgcock — Some Wood Staining Fungi from Various Localities in 

the United States. 204 

Kellerman — Notes from Mycological Literature, XXI. 211 

Kellerman — Index to North American Mycology. 221 

Editor’s Notes. 232 


IV. A. Kellerman , Ph. D. 

Professor of Botany, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 


Entered as Second Class Matter, Postoffice at Columbus, Ohio. 


PRESS OF F. J. HEER, COLUMBUS. OHIO. 














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Journal of Mycology 

VOX/CTVLE 113 — SEPTEMBER 1906 


TABLE OF CONTENTS 


Kellerman — A New Plowrightia from Guatemala. 185 

Arthur. — A New Classification of the Uredinales. .188 

Bain and Essary —A New Anthracnose of Altalfa and Red Clover.. 192 
Atkinson — Two New Species belonging to Naucoria and Stropharia 193 

Morgan — North American Species of Lepiota (continued) . 195 

Hedgcock — Some Wood Staining Fungi from Various localities in 

the United States. 204 

Kellerman — Notes from Mycological literature, XXI. 211 

Kellerman — Index to North American Mycology. 221 

Editor’s Notes .232 


A NEW PLOWRIGHTIA FROM GUATEMALA.* ./ 

W. A. KELLERMAN. 

A conspicuous disease of the American Century plant, Agave - 
arnericana, was noticed in Guatemala, C. A., the past two win¬ 
ters. The fungus attacks the living leaves at one or a few points, 
the infection then proceeding rapidly until the entire leaf may 
be involved. The clusters of the conspicuous fruiting bodies 
occupy suborbicular or oval spots which are very striking on ac¬ 
count of their size and red or yellowish-red color, later turning 
brown and finally black. 

Microscopic examiatnion reveals the presence of a coni- 
dial layer on the outer surface of the stromata, shown in Fig. 
3, Plate 90. The conidial cells as well as the hyphae of the outer 
portion of each stroma, are a bright brownish or yellowish color, 
under the microscope nearly hyaline. 

The stromata are arranged in concentric rows as shown in 
Fig. 1, the central ones rupturing the epidermis first, later others 
appearing, but the outermost incipient fruiting bodies never suc¬ 
ceed in uplifting the epiderims, though discoloring it. New spots 
of infection or rather central points of rupture by the stromata 
may be very close to older ones, and thus there is an effused area 
occupied by the fruits. Often the entire leaf, most commonly 
the upper portion, or only spots here and there, especially toward 
the apex, are involved. Both sides of the leaf show the con- 

* Contributions from the Botanical Laboratory of the Ohio State 
University. XXVI. 

Contribution to Guatemalan Mycology. II. 













186 


Journal of Mycology 


[Vol. 12 


spicuous stromata, but as a rule one side has fewer spots; some¬ 
times it is the upper surface of the thick fleshy leaf, sometimes 
the lower that shows more conspicuous and abundant infection. 

The fungus is a species of Plowrightia apparently unde¬ 
scribed. Tracy and Earle published, in the Bulletin of the Tor- 
rey Botanical Club, March 1901, p. 187, a species of this genus 
under the name of Plowrightia circumscissa, which they gave as 
occurring “on languishing leaves of some aloe (Agave sp. ?),” 
collected in Florida. When this was compiled by Saccardo for 
the Sylloge the host name “Alo.e” was omitted and the entry 
was made as follows: “in foliis languidis Agaves spec.” Some 
of the material from Tracy and Earle’s type No. was kindly fur¬ 
nished me from the Missouri Botanical Garden where, Prof. 
Tracy informed me, his collections had been sent. After thus 
passing through Dr. Trelease’s hands I find the host given on the 
label as Yucca gloriosa (Y. aloifolia). It seems certain therefore 
that Tracy and Earle’s host is not an Agave as mine is. At any 
rate my Plowrightia is very different, both in microscopic char¬ 
acters and especially in the appearance and disposition of the 
stromata. Compare Fig. 1, which shows two spots of the fungus 
here in question, and Fig. 6, which presents a portion of a leaf 
affected by Plowrightia circumscissa Tracy & Earle. A specimen 
of my material sent to Prof. Tracy elicited the reply: “Very dif¬ 
ferent from mine.” 

Another fungus somewhat similar in outward appearance to 
the Plowrightia, also collected in Guatemala, is shown in Fig. 7. 
It is Colletotrichum agaves Cav. No evidence was found to verify 
the suspicion at first entertained that the two might be forms of 
one and the same life cycle. Hedgecock reports (Annual Report 
of the Missouri Botanical Garden, 16:153-6. 1905) a study of 

this fungus, and he says “no ascigerous stage was found.” 

The technical description of the Plowrightia is given below. 
I have selected the specific name in honor of Mr. G. F. William¬ 
son, of Guatemala, whose courtesies materially assisted in the 
botanical explorations both of 1905 and 1906. Mr. R. A. Young 
assisted in the study of the fungus and he and Mr. L. A. Hawkins 
prepared under my direction the illustrative drawings. 

Plowrightia williamsoniana Kellerm. n. sp. Stromata 
rupturing the epidermis, prominent, globular to sub-quadrangular 
or oblong, J-j- mm. high, \-2 mm. long, arranged concentrically 
in five to ten (or more) somewhat irregular rows, the inner larger, 
the outermost poorly developed and scarcely lifting the epidermis, 
forming at first a definite suborbicular or oblong spot, but later 
fusing with adjacent affected areas, in many cases finally occupy¬ 
ing nearly or quite the entire leaf. 

The stromata are at first reddish yellow, becoming gradually 
brown, and finally black, the surface minutely papillate, the sub- 



























Journal of Mycology 


Plate 90 



PLOWRIGHTIA WILLIAMSONIANA Kellerm. (figs. 1-5); P. CIRCUMSCISSA 
Tr. & Earle (fig. 6); COLLETOTRICHUM AGAVES Cav. (fig. 7). 













































































Sept. 1906 ] A New Plowrightia from Guatemala 


187 


stance somewhat brittle but not carbonaceous. The upper portion 
of the pseudoparenchyma is conidiiferous, producing - an abun¬ 
dance of oblong to subglobular reddish or hyaline cells, 7-10x3-5 \x. 

The perithecial cavities are numerous (sometimes 40 or more 
in a stroma), 110-125x90-120 /*; asci numerous, oblong or sub- 
ovate-oblong, the basal part narrowed, 60-90x12-20 fx (mostly 
80-85x14-16 /a), thick-walled, containing 8 subdistichous, sub¬ 
equal, 2-celled, oval-oblong, yellowish or hyaline spores, 20- 
26x5-7 fx (mostly 22-24x5-6 /x). No paraphyses were seen. 

On living and languishing leaves of Agave americana, near 
Guatemala city, C. A., alt. 1200-1800 m. (Circ. 4,000-6,000 ft.) 
W. A. Kellerman Nos. 4629, 4630, 4631, January and February 
1905. 


Plowrightia williamsoniana Kellerm. n. sp.—Stromatibus epi- 
dermidem rumpentibus, prominentibus, globosis, vel sub-quadrangularis vel 
oblongis, *4 ~Va nun. altis, }4-2 mm. longis, in 5-10 (vel pluribus) lineis 
sub-irregulariter concentrice dispositis, intimis majoribus, extimis haud 
multum evolutis, epidermidem vix levantibus, primum maculam definitam 
sub-orbicularem vel oblongam efformantibus, dein cum adjacentibus areis 
affectis confluentibus, saepe folio partim vel omnino tandem infecto. 
Stromatibus primum fulvis, dein fuscis, denique nigris, superficie minute 
papillata, substancia subfragili non carbonacea, parte superiore paren- 
chymatis conidiifera, cellulas numerosas oblongas vel sub-globulares ru- 
bentes vel hyalinas abscindente, 7-10 x 3-5 fx. Loculis perithecialibus nu- 
merosis (plerumque 40 vel pluribus uno in stromate), 110-125x90-120^; 
ascis numerosis, oblongis vel subovato-oblongis, parte inferiore attenu- 
ata, 60-90 x 12-20(saepissime 80-85 x 14-16 /a), parietibus crassis, octo- 
sporis, sporis subdistichis, sub-aequaliter bilocularibus, ovali-oblongis, sub- 
fulvis vel hyalinis, 20-26 x 5-7 fx (plerumque 22-24 x 5-6 fx). Paraphyses 
non apparent. 

In foliis vivis languidisque Agaves americanae, prope urbem Guate¬ 
malan!, Amer. cen., alt. 1,200-1,800 m., W. A. Kellerman, 4629, 4630, 4631, 
in mensibus Jan. et Feb. MCMV. 

Explanation of Plate 90. — Plowrightia williamsoniana Kel¬ 
lerm. Fig. 1. An affected area of a leaf of Agave americana, showing 
the concentric arrangement of the stromata; fig. 2, diagram of a single 
stroma in vertical section; fig. 3, section of a portion of a stroma, show¬ 
ing two perithecial cavities and exhibiting the superficial conidiiferous 
layer; fig. 4, asci; fig. 5, spores; fig. 6, Plowrightia circumscissa Tr. 
& Earle on some Aloe; fig. 7, Colletotrichum agaves Cav. on Agave 
americana. 


188 


Journal of Mycology 


[Vol. 12 


/ A NEW CLASSIFICATION OF THE UREDINALES. 

BY J. C. ARTHUR. 

Separates of the paper on Eine Klassidkation der Uredineen, 
read by the present writer before the International Botanical 
Congress at Vienna in July, 1905, were distributed early in Au¬ 
gust of the present year to many Journals and Libraries, and 
to a large number of mycologists. Some of the phylogenetic 
reasons which are made the basis of this latest attempt at a 
natural arrangement of the genera of rusts have been more or 
less fully stated in other communications already before the pub¬ 
lic. The present occasion may be seized to state some of the 
aids and difficulties that will beset the practical acceptance of 
the classification. 

The simplicity of the old order of things disappears in this 
new arrangement, and herein will doubtless arise one of the 
strongest protests against it. When nine-tenths of all forms of 
rusts usually met with were easily assigned to the Uromyces- 
Puccinia group, and if they had one-celled teliospores were 
species of Uromyces, or two-celled teliospores were species of 
Puccinia, or if they happened to be aecia were species of Aecid- 
ium, the naming of rusts seemed an easy matter to the casual 
student. But in the new system it is essential that something 
of the life history be known, including the number of spore forms, 
and the structure of the sorus. Before, any species with a two- 
celled, stalked teliospore might be safely called a Puccinia; but 
now, such a species may rest in any one of thirteen genera. 
Before, it did not matter whether pycnia (spermogonia) accom¬ 
panied the telia, or other spore stages, or not; but now such 
association is often of fundamental importance in the location of 
a species in the system. Heretofore, the structure of the uredin- 
iosorus has been of slight systematic value; now, examination 
of this feature alone may place the species in the correct genus, 
or within a small group of genera. Such requirements for the 
naming of collections necessitate a more intimate knowledge of 
the rusts as a whole, some insight into their life-history and 
some appreciation of their structure. For this reason the system 
may not for a time prove as acceptable as the one in present use. 

There are, however, some short cuts to sufficient informa¬ 
tion to enable one to name his collections. Thus, telia associated 
with pycnia may be safely assumed to belong to a genus in which 
aecia and uredinia are wanting, or at most so little developed 
as to be of no taxonomic importance. In like manner pvcnia 
associated with uredinia, the so-called primary uredinia, may be 
assumed to indicate a genus in which aecia are wanting. If 
aecia show telia arising within or about them from the same 


Sept. 1906 ] A New Classification of the Uredinales 


189 


mycelium, it may safely be assumed that no uredinia belong to 
the life-cycle. Furthermore, it rarely or never happens that 
teliospores of the Uromyces-Puccinia type, germinating imme¬ 
diately upon maturity, belong to genera with other spore forms 
in the life cycle, excepting the largely tropical genera of Erio- 
sporangiam and Argotelium. 

Short cuts are also available in other directions. All gra¬ 
mineous and cyperaceous hosts bear rusts that may be assumed 
to possess all spore forms and are heteroecious, only one excep¬ 
tion being positively known at present. Rusts on rosaceous hosts 
largely belong to the genera of the sub-family Phragmidiatae, 
and on leguminous hosts largely to genera of the sub-families 
Raveneliatae and Uropyxidatae, and so on. 

But probably one of the most efficient short cuts, and a 
wholly legitimate one, owing to the phylogenetically intimate re¬ 
lation of fungus and host among the rusts, will eventually be 
the consultation of a host index. In the present chaotic condi¬ 
tion of taxonomic literature in this group no very comprehen¬ 
sive indexes exist, but they are likely to be provided in the early 
future. By this means it can be readily ascertained what species 
have been recognized upon the host in question, and from this 
list, usually small, not much difficulty will be experienced as a 
rule in locating the particular rust. 

Another difficulty in using the new system will probably be 
felt in the much larger number of genera to be recognized. Some 
of these genera have been long known, but only partially ac¬ 
cepted, and consequently little used, like Pileolaria, Uropyxis, 
Trachyspora, Gymnoconia, Kuehneola, Eriosporangium, and 
Dasyspora Not being well understood, they have remained mono- 
typic, or with only a few species each, although every one of these 
genera really contains more than one and some many species. 
Other genera have been established to recieve species which show 
relationships quite different from those usually assumed for them. 
Thus, Transzschelia and its closely associated genera have many 
characters showing their close relationship with the Ravenelia 
group, and have only superficial resemblances to the Puccinia- 
Uromyces group in which they have heretofore been submerged. 
But probably the most striking innovation is the placing of like 
species under different genera, according as they possess all or 
part of the spore forms in their life cycle. At first thought 
this seems to be an appropriation of the Schroeterian biological 
classes, into which every genus was considered to be potentially 
divisible, i. e., heteroforms, auteuforms, opsisforms, brachyforms, 
hemiforms, microforms, and leptoforms, and calling these classes 
genera. But in reality the basis of the segregates which I have 
recognized, for example, Dasvspora with teliospores, Bullaria, 
with urediniospores and teliospores, Allodus with aeciospores and 
teliospores, and Dicaeoma with all spore forms which take the 


190 


Journal of Mycology 


[Vol. 12 


place of the genus Puccinia as now commonly used, rests upon a 
wholly different consideration, having to do fundamentally with 
the progressive evolution of the rusts, and not with adaptations. 
While .space does not permit the presentation of an argument suf¬ 
ficiently full to demonstrate this proposition and carry convic¬ 
tion, yet it may be pointed out that while the genus Dasyspora 
includes species, all of which have progressed in their evolu¬ 
tion to the stage where the aeciospores and urediniospores have 
been effectively suppressed from the life cycle, yet it includes 
both leptoforms and microforms, according to their adaptations to 
the requirements of the environment, some species exhibiting only 
one or the other adaptation, and some assuming either form, now 
one, now the other, in accordance with conditions affecting 
growth not yet made clear. In the same way autoecism and 
heteroecism are regarded as adaptations, and not as an evolution¬ 
ary development of generic rank. Having set up this principle, it 
becomes logical to separate Gallowaya from Coleosporium , 
Chrysomyxa from Melampsoropsis, Macalpinia from Uromyclad- 
ium, Dendroecia from Raven elia, Calliospora from Uro pyxis, 
Nyssopsora from Triphragmium, Telospora from Nigredo, etc. 
But it would be a wholly false impression to assume that this 
character of the suppression of spore forms is the only one sepa¬ 
rating the genus from the others of its group. It is the most 
prominent and the most easily stated, but in most cases will be 
found associated with other characters of acceptable value. 

There is another argument beside that based upon phylogeny 
for the separation of species into genera as indicated above, and 
that is, convenience. It will lead, it is believed, to a better recog¬ 
nition of the various forms that go to make up each species, par¬ 
ticularly valuable in the exploration of new or old floral regions, 
and also will permit clearer concepts in discussions relating to 
phylogeny, ecology, distribution, cytology, and a host of other 
problems. Even if there are those who do not admit the validity 
of the claim for true generic characters underlying the genera in 
question, they must accord the right to establish among the rusts, a 
group of organisms where parasitism of the most obligatory 
nature has constantly reduced the number of chances for dis¬ 
playing diversified characters, while increasing the physiological 
sensitiveness of the fungus to variations in the host, genera of 
this kind so long as they are as useful for the genuine increase of 
knowledge as have been the genera Puccinia and Uromyces, 
which are separated upon no better grounds than those advocated 
for the genera in question, if in fact as good, and no one, so 
far as the writer knows, has seriously insisted upon merging 
these two genera. 

A few words may be said in regard to the nomenclature. 
The generic names have been chosen, such as are not new, in 
accordance with the American doctrine of types as applied in 


Sept. 1906 ] A New Classification of the Uredinales 


191 


the Philadelphia code. This course will doubtless be accepted 
as natural, whether considered best or not, seeing that the author 
was a member of the committee that drafted the code, and that 
he has on several subsequent occasions affirmed his belief in the 
essential validity of the principles which underlie the code. 
Granting the method of procedure, there is no need in this place 
to take up the question of the correct application of the several 
names; that may for the present be left to others. There are 
two names, that the establishment of types and application of 
the rule of priority have brought uppermost, i. e., Uredo and 
Aecidium, which mav lead to some confusion and inconvenience. 
Yet the number of species in the true genus Uredo and true 
genus Aecidum as distinguished from the form genera of these 
names, are so few, that the little inconvenience may be endured 
for the sake of correct method and final result. It is noteworthy 
that Aecidium as a genus name, supplied the basis, according to 
many authors, for the name of the order, while Uredo since 1825 
has been chiefly employed in this way, and is now firmly estab¬ 
lished as the genus on which the order Uredinales is founded. 

A word may be said by way of explanation regarding the 
method of citation. The manuscript was prepared in accordance 
With the American method, bub the printed proof submitted 
showed an evident editorial intention to have it changed to the 
German method, an intention most imperfectly carried out by the 
compositor. The typographical errors may be ascribed to the 
intricacies of this transformation, which diverted attention be¬ 
longing to legitimate proof reading. 

There is one question which is likely to come up in the mind 
of the reader, which finds no answer in the published article, 
that is, regarding the status of such forms as are too imperfectly 
known to be placed with much confidence in any of the recog¬ 
nized genera. The author proposes in his own work to retain 
such names as Peridermium, Caeonia, Roestelia, Uromyces and 
Puccinia as form genera for imperfectly understood species, and 
even Uredo and Aecidium in their customary acceptance as form 
genera, if a better course does not become evident. These will 
constitute an Anhang for recording undistributed and imperfectly 
known forms. 

Purdue University, Lafayette, Indiana. 


Journal of Mycology 


[Vol. 12 


A NEW ANTHRACNOSE OF ALFALFA AND RED 



CLOVER 


SAMUEL M. BAIN AND SAMUEL H. ESSARY 


In a preliminary note on clover diseases in Tennessee 
[Science, N. S. 17:503, 1905], we announced the discovery of a 
new clover disease in this State; caused by an undescribed spe¬ 
cies of Colletotrichum. Experiments have been under way for 
some time with a view to working- out the life history of the 
fungus, as well as to the breeding of a resistant strain of clover. 
We have apparently succeeded in our effort to secure resistance, 
while our work on the life history of the fungus is as yet in¬ 
complete. This necessitates the publication of a Bulletin on the 
breeding experiments and economic aspects of the disease before 
the final publication on the biological relations of the parasite 
producing it; hence, we thought best to publish here a description 
of the species. 

After the publication of the above mentioned preliminary 
note, we had opportunitv to compare notes and specimens with 
Mrs. Flora W. Patterson of the U. S. Department of Agricul¬ 
ture, to whom a similar species occurring on alfalfa had been 
submitted by Mr. J. M. Westgate. The two forms appeared to 
be taxonomically identical, and our further field observations 
during the summer of 1906 support this view. Our knowledge 
of its injury to alfalfa is quite limited, though the disease oc¬ 
curred rather abundantly on this plant here this year. In Vir¬ 
ginia, where the disease was first found on alfalfa by Mr. West- 
gate, it is said to have caused serious damage to the crop. 
There has been considerable complaint on the part of the far¬ 
mers in Tennessee of the difficulty of securing a stand of alfalfa, 
and it is quite probable that this disease is at least partly re¬ 
sponsible for the trouble. 

The devastation caused in clover fields by the disease here 
in Tennessee is remarkable. It occurs over the entire state, but 
appears to be much worse where clover has been cultivated for 
many years. In fact, our observations thus far would justify the 
statement that it is the most serious plant disease occurring in 
this State. 

The geographical extent of this anthracnose will be a matter 
of interest. We have observed it at one point each in Arkansas 
(Clarendon) and Kentuckv (Hopkinsville). Its occurence in 
Ohio and West Virginia is stated in the Yearbook of the De¬ 
partment for 1905; hence, it is probably widespread over the 
country. 

There appear to be in the case of clover two critical periods 
when it is especially susceptible to the disease. The first is when 



Sept. 1906 ] Two New Species op Naucoria and Stropharia 193 

seedlings of the previous spring’s sowing encounter the first pro¬ 
longed hot spells of summer. At this time the disease usually 
attacks the petioles. This appears to be the period of greatest 
injury. The other period of special susceptibility is during the 
ripening of the seed, when the severest attacks are on the stems 
just at or slightly below the surface of the ground. Many 
flower heads are also killed about flowering time by attacks just 
below, but the host plant as a whole appears usually to sur¬ 
vive. These statements are only general in character, however, 
for the plant may succumb to the disease at any time during 
the summer or early fall. 

We have named the species Colletotrichum trifolii, and ap¬ 
pend the following description: 

Colletotrichum trifolii Bain sp. nov.—Maculis atris vel fus- 
cis, saepe depressis; acervulis erumpentibus, sparsis vel gre- 
gariis; basidiis hyalinis, cylindricis vel fusoideis, conidiis prope 
aequalibus; conidiis hyalinis, rectis, utrinque rotundatis, 3-4 x 
11-13/x; setulis cum conidiis, continuis vel uniseptatis, paucis vel 
numerosis, fuligineis, ad apicem pallidioribus, 4-7 x 39-62^, saepe 
sinuosis vel nodulosis. 

Habitat in vivis caulibus et petiolis, rarissime in foliis Tri¬ 
folii pratensis et Medicaginis sativae, Tennessee, Kentucky, Ar¬ 
kansas; Virginia (J. M. Westgate) ; West Virginia, Ohio 
(Yearbook U. S. Department of Agriculture, 1905, p. 609). 

University of Tennessee, Knoxville. 


TWO NEW SPECIES BELONGING TO NAUCORIA AND 

STROPHARIA. 

GEO. F. ATKINSON. 

Material received from Prof. W. A. Kellerman and Supt. 
M. E. Hard, Central Ohio, prove to be undescribed species of 
fungi. The diagnoses of these two forms are given below; the 
first is also illustrated by a half-tone from photograph made by 
the collector. 


Naucoria paludosella Atkinson n. sp. 

20076. Photographed Coll. 

Growing on living sphagnum, other mosses and on rotten 
wood, Sphagnum moor, Buckeye Lake (Cranberry Island), Ohio, 
W. A. Kellerman 4464, Sept. 1905, and M. E. Hard and W. A. 
Kellerman, Oct. 1906. (4916, W. A. K.) 

Plants 6-8 cm. high; pileus 2J-3 cm. broad; stems 3-4 mm. 
thick. 



194 


/ournat of Mycology 


LVol. 12 


Pileus viscid when moist, convex to expanded, in age some¬ 
what depressed, clay color, darker over center, often with ap- 
pressed clay brown scales with a darker color. 

Gills raw umber to Mars brown (R), emarginate, adnate y 
sometimes with a decurrent tooth, easily becoming free. 

Cystidia on sides of gills none, edge of gills with large 
hyaline thin-walled cells, subventricose, sometimes nearly cylin¬ 
drical, abruptly narrowed at each end with a slight sinus around' 
the middle. 

Spores subovate to subelliptical, subinequilateral, smooth, 7- 
9x4-5 fi, fuscous ferruginous, dull ochraceous under microscope. 

Stem same color as pileus but paler, cartilaginous, floccose 
from loose threads or in some cases abundant threads over the 
surface, becoming hollow, base bulbous, the extreme base covered 
with whitish mycelium. 

Veil rather thick, floccose, disappearing leaving remnants on 
stem and margin of pileus when fresh. 

Stropharia hardii Atkinson n. sp. 

20118. Photographed G. F. A. 

Chillicothe, Ohio, received October 17, 1906, M. E. Hard 
No. 8. 

Plant 10 cm. high; pileus 9 cm. broad; stem 1^ cm. thick. 

Pileus pale bright ochraceous; gills brownish near Prout’s 
brown (R) ; stem pale yellow tinge. 

Pileus convex to expanded, thick at the center, thin toward 
the margin, smooth; flesh tinged yellow. 

Gills subelliptical to subventricose behind, broadly emargin¬ 
ate, adnexed. 

Basidia 4-spored. 

Spores suboblong, smooth, 5-9X3-5 /*, purple brown under 
the microscope. 

Cystidia not very numerous on sides of gills, varying from 
clavate to subventricose to sublanceolate, the free end more or 
less irregular when narrow, rarely branching below the apex 
and usually with a prominent broad apiculus or with two or 
several short processes. Similar cells on edge of gills, but some¬ 
what smaller and more regular. 

Stem even at the base, tapering to a short root, transversely 
floccose scaly both above and below the ring. The ring mem¬ 
braneous, not prominent but still evident, about 2 cm. from the 
apex. 

Explanation of Plate 91. — Photograph of fresh specimens of 
Naucoria paludosella Atkinson. Young specimens with the pileus unex¬ 
pended to the left below; above older plants with upturned cap; the 
plant over the black background shows the conspicuous clay brown scales- 
of the pileus. 


Journal of Mycology 


Plate 91 



NAUCORIA PALUDOSELLA Atkinson, 





























Sept. 1906 ] North American Species of Lepiota 


195 


NORTH AMERICAN SPECIES OF LEPIOTA. 


A. P. MORGAN. 

(Continued from p. 159). 

III. GRANULOSAE. Dermis of the pilens or at least its 
outer layer composed of granules, minute warts or furfuraceous 
particles; the investment of the stipe similar to that of the pileus; 
the veil of like structure , lacerate and appendiculate. 

The species of this tribe are mostly small Agarics growing 
on the ground in rich soils or on rotted wood. The granules 
form a loose, easily detached investment. Many species are 
enumerated. 

a. Lamellae adnate to 'the stipe. 

13. LEPIOTA AMIANTHINA Scopoli. Fl. Carn. i 772. 

Pileus ovoid then campanulate and explanate, subumbonate; 

the flesh thin, yellowish; the dermis furfuraceous-granulose, 
ochraceous; the veil lacerate and more or less appendiculate. 
Stipe subequal, slender, fistulous, scaly below the annulus and 
colored as the pileus. Lamellae rather broad, close, white be¬ 
coming yellowish, adnate ; spores elliptic, 5-7 x 4 mic. 

Growing on the ground in mountain woods. New York,. 
Peck; Vermont, Morgan. Pileus 2-4 cm. in diameter, the stipe 
4-8 cm. long and 2-4 mm. thick. 

14. LEPIOTA RUGOSO-RECTICULATA Lorinser, 
Oest. bot. Zeitschr. 1879. 

This species is not described further than the statement that 
it is related to L. amianthina; it differs from it in the surface 
of the pileus being rugose-reticulate, and in the odor being strong 
and almost acrid. 

Growing in mossy places in woods. New York, Peck. 

15. LEPIOTA ADNATIFOLIA Peck, 55 N. Y. Report. 
1901. 

Pileus broadly convex or nearly plane; the flesh thin, white; 
the dermis minutely granulose or squamulose, varying in color 
from alutaceous to fulvous; the margin usually appendiculate 
with the fragments of the veil. Stipe short, thick, solid then 
stuffed or hollow, glabrous or slightly scaly below the annulus, 
pallid or rufescent. Lamellae adnate, white; spores 5-6 x 4-5 
mic. 

Growing on the ground under Pine trees. New York, Peck. 
Pileus 3-6 cm. in diameter, the stipe 2-4 cm. long and 4-8 mm„. 
thick. 


196 Journal of Mycology [Vol. 12 

16. LEPIOTA GRANOSA Morgan, Journ. Cin. Soc. 
N. H. 1883. 

Pileus fleshy, ovoid then convex and expanded, subumbonate, 
more or less irregular and wavy in outline; the flesh thick, 
whitish or subochraceous, the dermis thick, furfuraceous-gran- 
ulose, ochraceous to fulvous; the veil of like substance. Stipe 
tapering upward from a thickened base, fistulous, fibrous-stuffed, 
whitish or subochraceous above the annulus, below clothed and 
colored as the pileus. Lamellae rather narrow, close, adnate, tap¬ 
ering outward, whitish or subochraceous; the spores subelliptic, 
5x3 mic. 

Gregarious or subcaespitose; growing on or near rotten 
stumps and logs in woods. Cincinnati, O.; New York, Peck; 
W. Virginia, Lloyd. Pileus 5-9 cm. in diameter, the stipe 5-10 
cm. long and 10-15 mm. thick. This is a rare plant with me; 
I have not seen it for many years. 

b. Lamellae free from the stipe or merely reaching it . 

17 . LEPIOTA CARCHARIAS Persoon. Disp. Fung. 

I 797 - . 

Pileus fleshy, ovoid then campanulate and explanate, um- 
bonate; the flesh thin, white; the dermis granulose, whitish, 
pinkish to flesh-color; the veil of similar substance and con¬ 
tinuous downward with the dermis of the stipe. Stipe tapering 
upward from a thickened base, fistulous, fibrous-stuffed, below 
the annulus clothed and colored as the pileus. Lamellae rather 
broad, close, white, tapering inward and reaching the stipe; 
spores subelliptic, 3-4 x 2.5-3.0 mic. 

Growing on the ground in woods, Dayton, O. Pileus 3-5 
cm. in diameter, the stipe 4-5 cm. long and 4-6 mm. thick. The 
taste and odor disagreeable according to Persoon. 

18 . LEPIOTA GRANULOSA Batsch, El. Fung. 1783 . 

Pileus fleshy, ovoid then convex and explanate, subumbo¬ 
nate, often radiately wrinkled; the flesh thin, white, rufescent; 
the dermis furfuraceous-granulate, ferruginous or fulvous to 
dark-rufous; the veil similar, lacerate and annendiculate. Stipe 
more or less elongated, subequal, fistulous, fibrous-stuffed, below 
the annulus clothed and colored as the pileus. Lamellae rather 
broad, close, white, rounded behind and slightly adnexed; spores 
elliptic 4-5 x 3-4 mic. 

Growing in open woods and waste places. Atlantic coast 
states, Schweinitz, Curtis, Peck, etc. Pileus 3-5 cm. in diam¬ 
eter, the stipe 3-7 cm. lonp- and 3-5 mm. thick. 

19. LEPIOTA CULTORUM B. & C., N. A. Fungi No. 
3- 1853. 

Pileus hemispheric, umbonate, the border sometimes repand, 
clothed with very numerous, brown, granular scales. Stipe short, 
furfuraceous; the annulus nearly central. Lamellae broad, ven- 


Sept. 1906 ] North American Species of Lepiota 


197 


tricose, free, remote; spores cymbiform, rather acute at either 
extremity, about 12 mic. in length. 

Growing among pumpkins in cultivated lands. S. Carolina, 
Curtis. Pileus 2-3 cm. in diameter, the stipe 2-3 cm. high and 
2 mm. thick. 

20. LEPIOTA REPANDA, Mastocephalus repandus 
Clements, Bot. Survey Neb. iv. 1896. 

Pileus fleshy, convex with a wavy outline, umbonate, the sur¬ 
face covered with minute crowded granular scales, incarnate- 
ochraceous. Stipe slender, equal, hollow, white above the an¬ 
nulus, below minutely floccose farinaceous and pinkish-ochrace- 
ous. Lamellae ventricose, free, white; spores globose or oval, 
5-7 x 5 mic. 

Growing on rich soil, Nebraska, Clements. Pileus 1-2 cm. 
in diameter, the stipe 2-3 cm. long and 1-2 mm. thick. 

IV. CLYPEOLARIAE. Dermis of the pileus a thin mem¬ 
brane, radiately hbrillose, the cuticle at first continuous but 
sooner or later broken up and drawn apart by the growth of the 
pileus, this at length presenting a whit e-fib rillose surface sprinkled 
with colored scales; the veil lacerate , part of it ahpendiculatc, 
continuous downward with the doccose-hbrillose investment of 
the stipe.' 

Agarics mostly of small size, comprising altogether many 
species. 

21. LEPIOTA CLYPEOLARIA, Agaricus clypeolar- 
ius Bulliard, Herb. Fr. 1788, Fries. Icones, Sel. 1867; Le- 

PIOTA CLYPEOLARIA, PECK, 54 N. Y. REP. I9OO. 

Pileus fleshy, ovoid then campanulate and explanate, sub- 
umbonate; the flesh thin, white; the dermis radiately-fibrillose 
and white or yellowish beneath the cuticle; the cuticle thin, 
at first continuous and fulvous or rufous, soon broken up except 
in the center and drawn apart into small scales; the margain 
appendiculate by fragments of the veil. Stipe tapering upward 
from a slightly thickened base, fistulous, fibrous-stuffed, fibrous- 
floccose below the annulus and white or yellowish. Lamellae 
rather broad, close, free, white or yellowish; spores oblong or 
subfusiform; 15-20x5-7 mic. 

Solitary or gregarious; growing in the woods of hilly and 
mountainous regions. New York, Peck. Pileus 3-7 cm. in 
diameter, the stipe 5-8 cm. long and 3-6 mm. thick. I give the 
species as figured by Fries and figured and described by the 
state botanist of New York. I am diposed to think the plant has 
a limited range, but the name has been widely used and no doubt 
generally applied to two or three of the following species. 


198 Journal of Mycology [Vol. 12 

22. LEPIOTA METULISPORA, Agaricus metulae- 
sporus B. & Br., Fungi of Ceylon, 1870. 

Pileus fleshy, ovoid then campanulate and explanate, subum- 
bonate; the flesh very thin and fragile, white or yellowish; the 
dermis radiately fibrillose, at length rimulose-sulcate; the cut¬ 
icle thin, at first continuous, pale ochraceous to fulvous and 
rufous, soon lacerate into small scales; the veil lacerate; ap- 
pendiculate. Stipe slender, hollow, fragile, tapering slightly up¬ 
ward, with a white or yellowish, floccose-fibrillose cuticle be¬ 
low the annulus. Lamellae rather narrow, close, free, white or 
yellowish; spores oblanceolate, 9-12x3-4 mic. 

Solitary or gregarious; growing among old leaves in woods. 
Southern U. S. Common about Preston, O. Pileus 2-4 cm. in 
diameter, the stipe 5-7 cm. long and 3-5 mm. thick. This seems 
to be a more delicate and fragile plant than L. clypeolaria; it is 
considered a “form” of the Ceylon species; it certainly does 
not strictly agree with the figures or the descriptions of the 
Ceylon or English species. 

23 . LEPIOTA SPANISTA Morgan, sp. nov. 

Pileus fleshy, ovoid then campanulate and expanded, sub- 
umbonate; the flesh thin, white; the dermis radiately fibrillose, 
at first continuous, alutaceous to pale umber, the cuticle at 
length separating into appressed scales; the veil lacerate, appen- 
diculate. Stipe tapering upward from a thickened base, fistu¬ 
lous, fibrous-stuffed, squamulose below the annulus and colored 
as the pileus. Lamellae rather broad, close, white, approximate; 
spores elliptic-oblong, 8-11x5 mic. 

Growing amongst rotten wood in woods. Preston, Ohio. 
Pileus 3-5 cm. in diameter, the stipe 4-6 cm. in length and 5-8 
mm. thick. A plant of firmer texture than L. metulispora. Ap¬ 
parently more closely related to L. helveola Bresadola, Fungi 
Tridentini. 

24 . LEPIOTA SUBLILACEA Peck, Bull. Torr. Club. 
1897. 

Pileus fleshy, convex, obtuse or umbonate; the flesh thin 
white; the dermis brownish- tinged with lilac, separating into 
small floccose scales; the veil slight, evanescent. Stipe short, 
solid, colored as the pileus below the annulus. Lamellae rather 
broad, subdistant, free, whitish; the spores elliptic, 10x5 mic. 
uniguttulate. 

Growing on bare ground in pastures. Kansas, Bartholomew. 
Pileus 1 - 2.5 cm. m diameter, the stipe 1-2.5 cm - long and 2-4 
mm., thick. This plant appears to have some resemblance to L. 
lilacea Bresadola. 

25 . LEPIOTA FLORALIS B. & Rav., N. A. Fungi No. 

4- 1853. 

Pileus fleshy, convex then explanate; the flesh very thin, 
white: "he dermis radiately fibrillose and striate around the mar- 


Sept. 1906 ] North Amcrica?i Species of Lepiota 


199 


gin; the cuticle separated into brownish, floccose scales. Stipe 
slender, attenuated downwards, brown like the pileus; the an¬ 
nulus persistent about the middle of the stipe. Lamellae broad, 
distant, ventricose, free; the spores about io mic. long. 

Gregarious; growing on rich soil in gardens. S. Carolina, 
Ravenel. Pileus 1-2 cm. in diameter, the stipe 2-2.5 cm. in length 
and not 1 mm. thick. It is desirable that the species be identified 
and better described. 

26 . LEPIOTA UMBROSA Morgan, sp. nov. 

Pileus fleshy, ovoid then campanulate and expanded, sub- 
umbonate; the flesh thin, white; the dermis radiately fibril- 
lose, white beneath the cuticle, cuticle tawny-brown, darker in 
the center, at maturity slightly parted into minute scales, the 
fibers on the umbo often acutely convergent; the veil flocculose, 
partly appendiculate. Stipe subequal above the mycelial bulb, 
fistulous, fibrous-stuffed, white and smooth above the annulus, 
below floccose-fibrillose and rufescent, with scattered tawny 
scales. Lamellae rather narrow, close, white, rounded behind, 
free, approximate; spores elliptic-oblong, obliquely apiculate, 

5- 6 x 3 mic. 

Growing on the ground in woods, Preston, Ohio. Pileus 
1.5-2.5 cm. in diameter, the stipe 4-5 cm. long and 2-4 mm. thick. 

27 . LEPIOTA GRACILIS Peck, Bull. Torr. Club. 
1900. 

Pileus fleshy, ovoid then convex and expanded, subumbonate, 
the flesh thin, white; the dermis white beneath the brown or 
blackish cuticle, which is soon broken up and drawn apart into 
small scales. Stipe long, slender fibrillose-floccose, brown or 
blackish; the annulus membranaceous, persistent, blackish on the 
under side. Lamellae close, ventricose, free whitish; the spores 
broadly elliptical, 6-7 x 4 mic. 

Growing in rich soil in woods, Canada, Dearness. Pileus 

6- 10 mm. in diameter, the stipe 2-3 cm. long and about 1 mm. 
thick. 

28. LEPIOTA FELINA Persoon, Synopsis 1801; Cooke. 
Illustrations. PI. 943. 

Pileus fleshy, ovoid then campanulate and explanate, sub¬ 
umbonate ; the flesh thin, white; the dermis radiately fibrillose, 
white beneath the black cuticle; the cuticle at first continuous 
soon broken up and drawn apart into small scales. Stipe tap¬ 
ering upward from a clavate base, fistulous, the cuticle whitish 
above, blackened and scaly below; the annulus thin membrana¬ 
ceous, deciduous. Lamellae rather narrow, close, free, white; 
spores elliptic-ovoid, 6-8 x 4-5 mic. 

Growing on the ground in woods. New York, Peck; Wis¬ 
consin, Denniston: Preston, O. Pileus 3-5 cm. in diameter; the 
stipe 5-8 cm. long, 2-3 mm. thick at apex, 3-6 mm. at the base. 


200 


Journal of Mycology 


[Vol. 12 


V. ASPERAE. Dermis of the pileus or at least its su¬ 
perficial layer hbrillose-scaly from the first, the scales reflexed 
and squarrose or the fibres fasciculate and convergent into pointed 
warts; the veil and the cuticule of the stipe may be of similar 
texture or the stipe may be nearly glabrous. 

A tribe of many species among which are some of rather 
large size. 

29 . LEPIOTA ASPERA, Amanita aspera Persoon, 
Synopsis, 1801. Agaricus acutesquamosus Weinman, Syl- 
loge I. 70. Stevenson, Br. Fungi I. 16. Cooke Illust. PI. 14. 

Pileus fleshy, hemispherical, then expanded and convex, ob¬ 
tuse ; the flesh moderately thick, white; the dermis appressedly 
tomentose, pale ferruginous, sprinkled with minute, sharp-pointed, 
brownish, easily separating warts; veil large, membranaceous, 
persistent, adherent in places to the margin of the pileus and 
annulate upon the stipe. Stipe tapering upward from a bulbous 
base, thick, fistulous, fibrous-stuffed, white above the annulus, 
below fibrillose-scaly and ferruginous. Lamellae rather narrow, 
closely crowded, white, tapering inward, free, approximate; 
spores 6-10x2-3 mic. 

Pileus 10-15 cm. in diameter; the stipe 8-12 cm. in length, 
8-12 mm. thick at the apex, 18-25 mm - the bulbous base. This 
plant and Lepiota Friesii are considered by Fries to be varieties 
of a single species. In Europe they grow in grassy grounds 
and gardens. In this country the plants reported under the name 
Lepiota acutesquamosa undoubtedly belong to several different 
species. 

30 LEPIOTA ASPRATA Berkeley. Hoooker's Jour¬ 
nal, 1847. Lepiota echinodermata Cke. & Mass. Grevillea 
xvi. 30. 

Pileus fleshy, convex then explanate; the flesh thin, white, 
the dermis a dense fibrillose-floccose layer, the fibers convergent 
into erect, conic warts, pale yellow to orange in color, the veil 
lacerate, appendiculate. Stipe slender, njearly equal, floccose- 
scaly below the annulus and colored as the pileus. Lamellae close, 
ventricose, white, slightly adnexed; spores sub-elliptic 8-10 x 
6 mic. 

Growing on the ground and on rotten wood. S. Carolina, 
Curtis; Alabama, Atkinson. Pileus 2-4 cm. in diameter, the 
stipe 4-5 cm. long and 3-4 mm. thick. Fries in the Novae 
Symbolae and also in the Hym. Eur. identifies this species with 
Pholiota muricata Fr. 

31. LEPIOTA HEMISCLERA B. & C. Fungi Cub. 1867. 

Pileus fleshy, ovoid then convex and explanate; the flesh 
thin, white; the dermis a dense fibrous coat, alutaceous to umber, 
the ends of the fibers curling up and convergent into small 
pointed warts; the veil ample, irregularly lacerate, continuous 
downward with the fibrillose cuticle of the stipe. Stipe fistulous, 


Sept. 1906] North American Species of Lepiota 


201 


fibrous-stuffed, white above the irregular annulus, below white- 
fibrillose, with or without some colored scales, arising from a 
bulbous base; the bulb depressed and marginate. Lamellae nar¬ 
row, closely crowded, white, some of them forked, obtuse behind 
and tapering outward, free; spores obtuse or truncate at one 
end, pointed at the other, 5-8 x 3 mic. 

Growing about old stumps and the base of trees in woods. 
Cuba. Wright; Preston, O. Pileus 5-9 cm. in diameter, the 
stipe 5-10 cm. long and 6-10 mm. thick above the marginate 
bulb. 

32. LEPIOTA ASPERULA Atkinson, Mushrooms. 
1901. Lepiota eriophora Peck. Bull. Torr. Club. 1903. 

Pileus fleshy, convex then expanded and explanate; the flesh 
thin, white; the dermis a thick fibrous coat, alutaceous to umber, 
at first densely scaly, the scales at length erected into pointed 
warts; the veil lacerate; appendiculate. Stipe subequal above 
the bulbous base, fistulous, fibrous-stuffed, below the annulus 
floccose-fibrillose and colored as the pileus. Lamellae rather nar¬ 
row, white, tapering inward, free; spores oblong, obliquely 
apiculate, 3-5 x 2-3 mic. 

Growing in rich soil in woods. New York, Atkinson; W. 
Virginia, Lloyd; Preston, O. Pileus 3-5 cm. in diameter, the 
stipe 4-6 cm. long and 3-5 mm. thick. The bulb at the base 
seems larger on account of the adherent soil and mycelium. I 
have heretofore called this species Lepiota hispida Lasch. 

33 . LEPIOTA FUSCOSQUAMEA Peck, 26 N. Y. Re- 
port 1873 and 35 N. Y. Report. 

Pileus fleshy, hemispherical or convex subumbonate; the 
flesh thin, white; the dermis consisting of numerous, substri- 
gose, erect or reflexed, blackish-brown scales; the veil slight, 
evanescent. Stipe short, equal above the bulbous base, fistulous, 
fibrous-stuffed, floccose-fibrillose and colored as the pilehs. La¬ 
mellae close, free, white; the spores elliptic-oblong, 6-8 x 3-4 mic. 

Growing in Pine and Hemlock woods. New York, Peck . 
Pileus 4-6 cm. in diameter, the stipe 5-7 cm. long and 6-8 mm. 
thick. A rare plant! 

34. LEPIOTA ACERINA Peck. 51 N. Y. Rep. 1897. 

Pileus subglobose, then convex and expanded; the flesh thin, 

white; the dermis at first a thin, dense, fibrous coat, tawny, 
darker in the center, separating at length into fibrillose scales ; the 
veil lacerate appendiculate. Stipe short fibrous-stuffed, fibril- 
lose-scaly, rufescent, the base bulbous. Lamellae rather broad, 
white, obtuse behind, approximate; spores pointed at one end, ob¬ 
tuse or truncate at the other, 8-10x3-4 mic. 

Growing on rotten wood in woods. New York, Peek, Pres¬ 
ton, O. Pileus 1.5-2.5 cm. in diameter, the stipe 2-4 cm. long 
and 2-4 mm. thick. Apparentlv much resembling L. Boudieti 
Bres., especially as to the spores. 


202 


Journal of Mycology 


[Vol. 12 


35. LEPIOTA GEMMATA Morgan, sp. nov. 

Pileus fleshy, at first globose then convex and expanded; 
the flesh thick, white; the dermis rather thick, white, its surface 
from the first divided up into minute, erect, pointed warts, which 
grow dusky with age; the veil appendiculate. Stipe tapering 
upward, fistulous, fibrous-stuffed, white, flocculose-scaly up to 
the annulus, the scales becoming dusky. Lamellae broad, close 
white, inwardly obtuse and approximate; spores oblong, obliquely 
apiculate, 4-6 x 2.5-3.0 mic. 

Growing in rich soil or rotten wood. Preston, O. Pileus 
2-4 cm. in diameter, the stipe 3-5 cm. long, and 3-5 mm. thick. 
Before the expansion of the pileus it looks like a young Lyco- 
perdon gemmatum. After maturity the superficial pointed warts 
sometimes disappear leaving the surface pulverulent. 

VI. GLIODERMATA. Dermis of the pileus continuous, 
never separating into scales, but the surface invested by a more 
or less thickened layer of gluten , pellucid or colored. Stipe 
commonly dry and squamulose or subglabrous, in a few species 
with a viscid cuticle like the pileus. 

36. LEPIOTA CANDIDA Morgan sp. nov. 

Pileus fleshy, ovoid then convex and explanate, subum- 
bonate; the flesh thin, white; the dermis radiately fibrillose, 
smooth, pure white, covered by a very thin viscous epidermal 
layer, at first continuous, but with the growth of the pileus drawn 
apart and left as minute scales upon the surface. Stipe long, 
tapering upward from a clavate base, fistulous, silky-fibrillose or 
quite smooth, pure white; the annulus thin, membranaceous, per¬ 
sistent. Lamellae narrow, close, free and rather remote, pure 
white; spores elliptic-oblong, obliquely apiculate, 5-7 x 3-4 mic. 

Growing on the ground among old leaves in woods. Pres¬ 
ton, O. Pileus 1-3 cm. in diameter; the stipe 5-7 cm. long, 
5-6 mm. thick at the base, tapering to 2-3 mm. at the apex. The 
surface of the pileus sticks to the fingers and to the paper in 
which it is folded. 

37. LEPIOTA DELICATA Fries. Syst. Myc. I, 1821. 
Icones Sel. Tab. 15. Cooke, Illust. Pl. 118. 

Pileus fleshy, globose, then convex and explanate; the flesh 
thin white; the dermis smooth and glabrous, yellowish or ru- 
fescent, furnished with a viscid cuticle. Stipe tapering slightly 
upward, fistulous, fibrous-stuffed, white above the annulus, be¬ 
low densely floccose and colored as the pileus, the annulus mem¬ 
branaceous. Lamellae broad, close, white, free, approximate, 
spores -. 

Growing on the ground in woods. N. Carolina, Schwei- 
nitz. Pileus 2-3 cm. in diameter, the stipe 2-3 cm. high and 3-5 
mm. thick. 



Sept. 1906] North American Species of Lepiota 


203 


38 . LEPIOTA OBLITA Peck. 26 N. Y. Rep. 1873 and 
35 N. Y. Rep. 

Pileus fleshy, convex and expanded, subumbonate; smooth 
or obscurely spotted or scaly, viscid, alutaceous inclining to tawny, 
the umbo generally darker. Stipe equal or slightly tapering up¬ 
ward, smooth at the top, floccose and viscid elsewhere, fistulous, 
fibrous-stuffed. Lamellae crowded, free, whitish or yellowish, 
some of them forked; spores elliptic 5-6 x 3-4 mic. 

Growing in frondose woods. New York, P,eck. Pileus 5-7 
cm. in diameter, the stipe 5-7 cm. long and about 6 mm. thick. 

39. LEPIOTA GLISCHRA Morgan sp. nov. Agaricus 
oblitus Morgan, Myc. Flora M. V. 

Pileus fleshy, subovoid then convex and expanded; the flesh 
rather thin, white; the epidermis a thin layer of brown gluten, 
thickest at the center rendering it darker colored; this glutinous 
layer continuous with the marginal veil and running down and 
enveloping the stipe. Stipe tapering upward, solid, whitish- 
fibrillose beneath the brown gluten. Lamellae broad, close, white, 
rounded behind, free, approximate; spores globose or ovoid, 
apiculate, 4-5 x 4 mic. 

Growing in rich soil in woods. Preston, O. Pileus 3-4 cm. 
in diameter, the stipe 4-6 cm. long and 3-4 mm. thick. 

40. LEPIOTA FULVODISCA Peck. Bull Torr. Club. 
1895. 

Pileus thin, convex or nearly plane, obtuse or umbonate, 
viscid, white, the umbo fulvous. Stipe slender, flexuous, viscid, 
hollow, white or whitish, abruptly bulbous at the base; the an¬ 
nulus thin, membranaceous, white. Lamellae narrow, close, free, 
white; spores elliptic-ovoid, 8-10x4-5 mic. uniguttulate. 

Growing on the ground among old leaves in woods. Cal¬ 
ifornia, M. Clatchie. Pileus 2-4 cm. in diameter, the stipe 5-8 
cm. long and 2-3 mm. thick. 

41. LEPIOTA ILLINITA Fries. Obs. Myc. II. 1818. 
Icones Sel. Tab. 16 . 

Pileus fleshy, ovoid then campanulate and expanded sub¬ 
umbonate ; the white pileus invested by a thick glutinous layer, pel¬ 
lucid or scarcely colored, which is at first continuous downward 
upon the stipe. Stipe slender, equal, fistulous, fibrous-stuffed, 
white beneath the glutinous cuticle. Lamellae broad, close, free, 
white ; spores broadly elliptic, 5-6 x 4 mic. « 

Growing on the ground in grassy woods and fields. New 
York, Peck; Vermont, Morgan ; Pacific Coast. Pileus 4-7 cm. 
in diameter, the stipe 5-8 cm. long and 4-6 mm. thick. 

(To be continued.) 


204 


Journal of Mycology 


[Vol. 12 


SOME WOOD STAINING FUNGI FROM VARIOUS LO¬ 
CALITIES IN THE UNITED STATES . 1 

GEO. G. HEDGCOCK. 

(Condensed from the original notes and from descriptions 
of the cultural characters in the report of the Missouri Botanical 
Garden* *) 

The following species of fungi are described from artificial 
cultures grown under similar conditions, on similar agar media, 
and in most cases compared with measurements made from nat¬ 
ural growths on wood or other substances. 

Ceratostomella in all the species studied has at first a hya¬ 
line conidial stage of short duration which soon changes in color 
and developes dark colored, beaked perithecia, with hyaline asco- 
spores borne in fugacious asci. 

Graphium in artificial cultures has two quite distinct conidial 
stages; the first form of conidia is borne on simple, hyaline, erect 
hyphae, and disappears later, as the stalks or stromatal out¬ 
growths bearing the heads with the second form are developed. 
The conidia of the first form, on account of their temporary 
nature, are called secondary conidia, and those borne in the 
mucilaginous heads primary conidia, because they are consid¬ 
ered the most important conidial stage. 

i. Ceratostomella pilifera (Fr.) Wint., Kryptogamenfl. 
2:252, Sphaeria pilifera Fr. Syst. Myc. 2:472, Sphaeria ros- 
strata Schum. Enum FI. Saell. p 128, Cerotostoma piliferum 
Fuckl. Symb. p. 128. Emended, Fledgcock, Mo. Bot. Gard. 
Rept. 17:64-67, pi. 4, fig. 5-7. Colonies white in condial stage, 
changing to gray or brown, with the formation of perithecia; 
filaments, 3/a to 4/a, hyaline to brown or black; conidia, 8/a to I2/a 
by 2jx to 4 /a, hyaline elliptical to cylindrical, borne terminally 
in whorls of short, branching chains from upright, hyaline hy¬ 
phae ; perithecia, usually superficial, carbonaceous, globose to 
pyriform, smooth or sparsely hirsute below, 50 /a to 200/A in 
diameter, with a long, slender beak, 600 /a to 1,050/A by 20 4 , ter¬ 
minated by a ring of hyaline bristles, 20/a by 2/a average; asci, 
fugacious, hyaline, pyriform to ovate, io/a to 15/* by 8/x to io/a; 
ascospores, 8, biseriate, hyaline, elliptical, often curved slightly, 
5.5/A to 2.5/A average, exuded in a mucous mass. 

On the wood of Pinus ponderosa Laws, staining it a blue- 
black color. Collector, H. von Schrenk, Sheridan, Wyoming, 
January, 1903. 


0) Published by permission of the Secretary of Agriculture. 

* Hedgcock, G. G. Studies upon some chromogenic fungi which 
discolor wood. Mo. Bot. Gar. Rep. 17: 59-114. PI. 4-12; 190G, issued 
as a separate, Sep. 27, 1906. 



Sept. 1906 ] Some Wood Staining Fungi , Etc. 


205 


2. Ceratostomella schrenkiana Hedgcock. Mo. Bot. 
Gard. Rept. 17:67-69, pi. 4, fig. 1-4. Colonies with conidia white, 
changing to gray with the formation of perithecia; filaments 
hyaline to brown, 3/x to Jjx; conidia, hyaline, often guttulate when 
old, elliptical to cylindrical, 3 /x to 7/x by i/x to 2/x, borne terminally 
on upright hyphae in short, branching chains; perithecia, glo¬ 
bose, 120/x to 200/x, black, carbonaceous, often slightly hirsute 
below, or with numerous globular outgrowths, with a beak 8 mm. 
to 1.2 mm. by 10/x to 25/x, surmounted at maturity with a ring 
of short, hyaline, spreading bristles, 10/1 to 15/*• by 2/x; asci, 
fugacious, ovate to pyriform; ascospores, hyaline, elliptical, often 
slightly curved, 2.5/x to 4/x by ,i/x to 1.5/x. 

On the wood of Pinus echinata Mill., staining it a blue-black 
color. Collector H. von Schrenk, Grandin, Mo., July, 1905. 

3. Ceratostomella echinella E. & E. N. A. Pyr. 195 
(1892). Emended, Hedgcock, Mo. Bot. Gard. Rept. 17:69-71, 
pi 6, fig. 1. Colonies with conidia, white, changing to brown 
with perithecia; hyphae, hyaline to brown, 4/x to 7/x in diam.; 
conidia obovate to elliptical, 4/x to 6.5/x by 2/x to 3.5/x, borne in 
whorls of short, branching chains, from upright, hyaline hyphae; 
perithecia, globose or slightly flattened, 50/x to ioo/x, glandular- 
pubescent, membranaceo-carbonaceous, with a long, slightly 
curved, striate beak, imm. to 1.7mm. by 15/x to 25/x, terminated 
with a ring of hyaline bristles, averaging 15/x to 25/x by 1.5/x to 
2/x; glandular hairs on peritheeium 10/x to 32/x in length, taper¬ 
ing from 1.5/x to 2 .i/x in diam., with glandular, globose tip, 2 /x to 3/x 
in diam.; asci, elliptical to clavate; ascospores, hyaline, cylin¬ 
drical or slightly curved, biseriate, 4/x to 6/x by 1.2/x to 1.6/x, cream 
colored in mass. 

On wood of Fagus atropunicea (Marsh.) Sud., staining it 
blue or brown. Collector H. von Schrenk, Kirbyville, Texas, 
July, 1906. 

4. Ceratostomella capillifera Hedgcock. Mo. Bot. 
Gard. Rept. 77:71, 72, pi. 6, fig. 2, 3. Colonies with conidia 
white, changing to gray or brown, with perithecia; filaments, 
hyaline to brown 2/x to 6/x in diam.; conidia, hyaline, elliptical to 
cylindrical, 4/x to 8/x by 1.5/x to 2/x, borne in short branching- 
chains, terminal from upright hyphae; perithecia, globose, often 
flattened, black, carbonaceous, slightly hirsute below-, 90/x to 
200/x, with a slong, slender beak, 1.5 mm. by 25/x, terminated in 
a ring of long slender, hyaline filaments, 80/x by i/x; asci, fu¬ 
gacious, obovate; ascospores, 8, elliptic to reniform, 4.5/x to 1.5/x 
average. 

On the wood of Liquidambar styraciflua L., staining it black. 
Collector H. von Schrenk, Marianna, Arkansas, July. 1905. 

5. Ceratostomella pluriannulata Hedgcock. Mo. Bot. 
Card. Rept. 77:72-74, pi. 5, fig. 2. Colonies with conidia white, 


206 


Journal of Mycology 


[Vol. 12 


changing to black with perithecia; filaments hyaline to brown; 
conidia, hyaline elliptical or obovate, 5ft to 8ft by 2ft to 3^, borne 
terminally on erect hyphae in short, branching chains finally fall¬ 
ing together in clusters ; perithecia globose 90ft to 120ft in diam. 
black, carbonaceous, slightly hirsute below, with a smooth beak, 
.9 mm. to 2.1 mm. by 10 ft to 30 ft, adorned by one or more rings of 
short, spiny bristles, one of which is terminal; asci, obovate; 
ascospores, hyaline, reniform to elliptical, 4 /x to $/x by i.$jx to i.y/x. 

On the wood of Quercus rubra L., discoloring it. Collector 
P. Spaulding, southern Indiana, August, 1905. 

6 . Ceratostomella minor Hedgcock. Mo. Bot. Gard. 

Rept. 17:74-76, pi. 5, fig. 6, 7. Colonies with conidia, white, 
changing to black with perithecia; filaments, hyaline to dark 
brown, 1.5ft to 4/x in diam., often coarsely rugose in wood cells; 
conidia, hyaline, 4\x to 5.5 ft by 1.8ft to 2ft average, oval to ellip¬ 
tical, borne terminally on upright hyphae in short, branching 
chains; perithecia solitary, numerous, spherical, black, car¬ 
bonaceous, rugose, sparsely hirsute at the base, 40 jx to 70 /x in 
diam.; with a beak 120/x to 160 fx by 6 /x to I2ft surmounted at 
maturity by a ring of thick hyaline bristles; asci, fugacious, round 
to oval or pyriform; ascospores, 8, hyaline, 3.1/t to 4.2ft by .g/x 
to 1.9ft, usually in four. < 

On the wood of Pinus arizonica Eng., staining it blueish- 
black. Collector J. L. Webb, Flagstaff, Arizona, July, 1904. 

7 . Ceratostomella exigua Hedgcock. Mo. Bot. Gard. 
Rept. 17176-78, pi. 6, fig. 4-7. Colonies with conidia white, 
changing to intense black with perithecia; filaments, hyaline to 
dark brown, often finely rugose in wood, 2/x to 6 /x in diameter, 
conidia 3.5ft to 4.5ft by 1.6ft to 2.2«, oval to elliptical, borne 
terminally on upright hyphae in short, branching chains falling 
together in rounded masses; perithecia, often gregarious, usu¬ 
ally superficial, sparsely hirsute at base, black, carbonaceous, 
rugose, globose, 60ft to 80ft in diameter with a beak 150ft to 200/x 
by 8ft to 18/x, terminating in a ring of slender hyaline bristles; 
asci, fugacious, hyaline, pyriform to elliptical; ascospores, 8, 
often in fours, hyaline, elliptical to reniform, 2.1/x to 2.8ft by o.8/a 

to I.Ift. 

On wood of Pinus virginiana Mill., staining it dark blue 
or black. Collector A. D. Hopkins, Kanawha, W. Va., Sept., 
1904. 

8 . Ceratostomella moniliformis Hedgcock. Mo. B'ot. 
Gard. Rept. 77:78-80, pi. 5, fig. 3-5. Colonies with conidia, gray, 
changing to black, with the formation of perithecia; filaments, 
hyaline, 2ft to 8ft in diam., often granular, later brown or black; 
conidia, hyaline, 6ft to 8 /x by 1 .8ft to 2.2ft, elliptical to cylindrical, 
moniliform, collecting in masses, borne on simple or branching 
erect hyphae; perithecia brown or black, often membranaceous, 


Sept. 1906 ] Some Wood Staining Fungi , Etc. 


207 


globose, 90 /a to i8o/a in diam., covered sparsely with conical 
spines, 12/1 to 20 /a in length by i/a at the apex, and 6 /a at the 
base; the beak is brown or black, .6 mm. to 1 mm. by io/a to 30/1, 
striate, surmounted by thick, hyaline bristles, 12 /a to i8/a by 2 /a; 
asci, oval, 20 /a by io/a, fugacious; ascospores, 8, hyaline gray in 
mass, oval to elliptical often flattened on one side, 4 /a to 5 /a by 
3 /a to 4 /a. 

On the wood of Liquidambar styraciflua L., staining it 
brown. Collector H. von Schrenk, Kirbyville, Texas, July, 1906. 

9. Graphium eumorphum Sacc., Syll. Fung. 4:611, Sporo- 
cybe eumorpha Sacc. Fung. It. n. 942. (1881). Emended, Bou¬ 
langer, Rev. Gen. de Bot. 7:97-102, 166-170. (1895)., pi. 2-5. 
Hedgcock, Mo. Bot. Gard. Rept. 17: 87-88, pi. 7, fig. 1-5. Colo¬ 
nies white or gray, changing to light, or even dark green in the 
stromata; hyphae, i/a to 2 /a in diameter, hyaline to light green; 
secondary conidia, 7.8/A by 3.4/A, hyaline, often greenish yellow, 
borne singly or in whorled clusters on upright hyphae; primary 
conidia', 7.7/A by 3.4/A, hyaline, tinged with green, borne termi¬ 
nally on alternately branched hyphae in mucoid, stromatal heads; 
heads, spherical with mucous sheath, oval without, 30/t to ioo/a 
in diameter, gray to iridescent green; stalks, simple or gre¬ 
garious, dark to light green, or even yellow green, 300/A to 500/A 
in length, io/a to 40/A in diameter; Anthina-like forms present. 

On wood of Rubus strigosus L., staining it a dirty color. 
Missouri Botanical Garden, June, 1905. G. G. Hedgcock, col¬ 
lector. 

10. Graphium atrovirens Hedgcock, Mo. Bot. Gard. 
Rept. 17:88-90, pi. 8, fig. 1-3. Colonies white, changing to dark 
green in the stromata; filaments, 3 /a to 4/1, hyaline, changing to 
gray, green or olive; secondary conidia, 4 /a to 5.5/1 by 1.6/1 to 2 /a, 
hyaline, obovate to elliptical, guttulate when old, borne on simple 
hyphae in short, branching moniliform chains, finally adhering 
in masses; primary conidia, 3.5/A to 4.5/A by 1.4/A to 2/a, hyaline, 
obovate to ellipical, borne in flattened, oval, white to gray heads, 
which with mucous sheath measure 40/A to 6 oo/a in diameter; 
stromatal stalks, usually solitary, slender hyaline to dark green, 
1.5mm to 3mm. by 8 /a to 8 o/a, base often slightly enlarged; tall, 
sterile, Anthina-like stalks often form. 

On the wood of Liquidambar styraciflua L., Marianna.Ark., 
staining it black. Collected by H. von Schrenk, July, 1905. 

11. Graphium smaragdinum (A. & S.) Sacc. Syll. Fung. 
4:618. Emended, Hedgcock, Mo. Bot. Garden Rep. 17:91, 
92, pi. 9, fig. 8-10. Colonies white to gray-green or olive in stro¬ 
mata ; filaments hyaline to dark green, 2 /a to 4 /a in diameter; 
secondary conidia 3.6/1 by i.8/a, hyaline, elliptical, borne continu¬ 
ously from the ends of simple or branched upright hyphae, col¬ 
lecting in mucoid masses; primary conidia, 3.2/1 to 4.2/A by 1.7/4 


208 


Journal of Mycology 


[Vol. 12 


to 2/x, hyaline, elliptical, borne from the ends of alternately 
branched hyphae in the stromatal heads; heads with mucous 
sheath, spherical, 40/x to 600/x, without sheath, fungiform, often 
with the edges recurved; stalks simple and gregarious, imm. to 
2mm. by 8 /x to 90/x, often enlarged in the center, sterile Anthina- 
like outgrowths of the stroma often present. 

On the wood of Liquidambar styraciflua L., Marianna, Ark., 
staining it black. Collected by H. von Schrenk, July, 1905. 

12 . Graphium rigidum (Pers.) Sacc. Syll. Fung. 4:610, 
Stilbum rigidum Pers. Uster Annal. 1 '.32. Emended, Hedgcock, 
Mo. Bot. Gard. Rept. 77:92-94, pi. 7, fig. 6-10. Colonies white, 
changing to brown or black in stromata; hyphae, 2/x to 4/x in 
diam., hyaline to gray or olive; secondary conidia, 3/x to 4.5/x by 
i/x to 1.5 fx, hyaline, elliptical, borne continuously and terminally 
from erect simple or branched hyphae, falling at once into mucoid 
masses; primary conidia, 3.5/x to 1.5/x, elliptical to cylindrical, 
hyaline, borne on alternately branched hyphae in stromatal heads; 
heads spherical, with mucous sheath, 20/x to 500/x in diam., white 
to a dingy yellow; stalks, 1 mm. to 2mm. by 10/x to 40/x, gray to 
brown or black, solitary or gregarious, rigid, not expanded. 

On the sapwood of Quercus rubra L., staining the wood 
brown. Collector, P. Spaulding, Indiana, Sept., 1905. 

13. Graphium aureum Hedgcock, Mo. Bot. Gard. Rept. 
77:94-96, pi. 9, fig. 5-7. Colonies white, changing to pale yellow 
or light brown in the stromata; filaments, 2/x, to 3/x, hyaline to 
light brown; secondary conidia, 4/x to 8/x by i/x to 2/x,, obovate to 
clavate, hyaline, guttulate when old, borne in short, branching 
moniliform chains or in clusters of simple conidia; primary 
conidia, 4/* to 5/1 by i/x to 2/x,, hyaline, obovate, borne terminally 
on filaments of the flattened, oval head; head with mucous white 
to yellow, spherical, 15/x to 240/x in diameter; stromatal stalks, 
simple or gregarious, 50 /a to 750/x by 10/x to 90/x; sterile, Anthina- 
like stalks are often present. 

On sapwood of Pinus strobus L., Ashland, Wisconsin, stain¬ 
ing it a dirty color. Collected by H. von Schrenk, April, 1905. 

14. Graphium album (Corda) Sacc. Syll. Fung. 4:618, 
Ceratopodium album Corda Ic. Fung. 1:20. Emended, Hedg¬ 
cock, Mo. Bot. Gard. Rept. 77:96-97, pi. 9, fig. 1-4. Colonies 
white, changing to light yellow or orange in the stromata; 
filaments hyaline to yellow or light brown, 2/x, to 3/x in diameter; 
secondary conidia, 4/x to 6/x by i/x to 2/x, hyaline, obovate to 
clavate, guttulate when old, borne in short, branching moniliform 
chains terminally from erect hyphae; primary conidia 3/x to 5/x 
by i/x to 1.5/x, hyaline, obovate, borne terminally on the fila¬ 
ments of the stromatal heads; heads white to creamy yellow, or 
even a light brown when old and dry, spherical with mucous, 20 /x 
to 600/x, in diameter, without mucous a flattened oval to fungi- 


Sept. 1906 ] Some Wood Staining Fungi , Etc. 


209 


form, stalks .3mm. to 2mm. by 30/A to 300/A, varying from yel¬ 
low to dark brown at the base; Ant him- like, stromatal forms 
present. 

Found on sapwood of Fagus atropunicea (Marsh.) Sud., 
staining it brown. Collected by P. Spaulding, Arkansas, Sept., 

1905. 

15. Graphium ambrosiigerum Hedgcock, Mo. Bot. Gard. 
Rept. 1 7 :85-86, pi. 8, fig. 4-7. Colonies white, changing to 
brown in stromata; filaments 1.5/A to 2.5/A, hyaline to brown; 
secondary conidia 3.7/A by 1.3/A, hyaline, oval to elliptical, borne in 
whorled clusters of simple conidia on upright hyphae; primary 
conidia 5/a by 3/a, borne on filaments in stromatal heads; heads 
oval without mucous sheath, white to dark brown, with sheath, 
spherical, 30/1 to 300/a; stalks black or brown, 500/A to 900/A by 
io/a to 40/A, simple or gregarious. 

On the sapwood of Finns arizonica Eng. in beetle holes 
staining it black. Collected by J. L. Webb, Flagstaff, Arizona, 
July, 1904. 

16. Fusarium roseum Link Sp. PI. Fungi 2:105. Fusi- 
dium roseum Link Obs. 2:31. Colonies white, changing to pink, 
red, or lilac; microconidia one- to two-celled, hyaline, oval to 
elliptical, 8/a to 14/A by 3/a to 6/a, often uninucleate; macro- 
conidia, 19/A to 30/A by 3.5/A to 6/a, straight or slightly curved, 
fusiform, two- to four-celled; chlamydospores, spherical, or 
slightly flattened, granular, yellow to dark brown, io/a to 14/A in 
diameter; dark green or brown sclerotia present in cultures on 
boiled potato; staining pine sapwood pink to lilac. 

On the sapwood of Finns strobus L., Ashland, Wisconsin. 
Collected by H. von Schrenk, April, 1905. 

Saccardo gives several varieties of Fusarium roseum, most 
of which differ greatly in the size of the microconidia. Those of 
our fungus are smaller than most of the measurements given by 
Saccardo, making it a little doubtful if the species is F. roseum . 

17. Hormodendron cladosporioides (Fres.) Sacc. Mich. 
2:148. Penicillium cladosporioides Fres. Beitr. 3:22. Colonies, 
gray or greenish yellow, changing to velvety brown or black; 
filaments, gray to olive, 2/a to 8/1; sporophores, ioo/a to 400/A 
by 3/a to 4/a, with branches one to three-septate, measuring 6/a to 
15/t by 3/a to 5/a; conidia, 3/a to 7/a by 2/a to 4/a, usually uni¬ 
cellular, oval, olive, or brown, in short, branched chains of two 
to six, staining sapwood black. 

On the sapwood of pine, elm, gum and oak, Missouri and 
Arkansas. Collected by H. von Schrenk and Geo. G. Hedgcock. 

18. Hormodendron griseum Hedgcock, Mo. Bot. Gard. 
Rept. 77:100, 101, pi. 10, fig. 2. Colonies gray, changing to 
dingy black, furry; filaments, granular, hyaline to gray or 
black, 3/a to io/a in diameter; sporophores, 20,a to 8oo/a by 


210 


Jouriial of Mycology 


[Vol. 12 


3/x to 4/4, with branches one to three-septate, measuring 6/4 to 14/4 
by 3/4 to 4/4; conidia 3/4 to 6/4 by 2/4 to 4/4, usually unicellular, 
pointed oval, gray to sooty, borne in short, branched chains of 2 
to 10; staining sapwood black. 

On the wood of Liquidambar styracifLua L., from various 
points in Arkansas. Collected by H. von Schrenk, July, 1905. 

19. Hormiscium gelatinosum Hedgcock, Mo. Bot. Gard. 
Rept. 17:101-103, pi. 11, fig. 4-8. Colonies yeast-like at first, 
creamy, changing to brown or black, finally becoming fimbriate 
or toruloid; filaments, often toruloid or beaded, cylindrical cells 
5/4 to 10/4 in diameter, and spherical cells 2/4 to 8/4 ; conidia borne 
both on prostrate and upright hyphae, dimorphus, the form on 
prostrate hyphae is of two types, the one hyaline, elliptical, thin- 
walled, fugacious, 8/4 to 12/4 by 3/4 to 5/4, the other brown, ellip¬ 
tical, thick-walled, 10/4 to 14/4 ; the form on short, upright hy¬ 
phae, globose dark olive, 7/4 to 12/4 in diameter, borne in chains 
which do not break apart readily; staining sapwood black. 

On the sapwood of pine, elm and gum, from various points 
in Arkansas and Missouri, collected by H. von Schrenk and Geo. 
G. Hedgcock, 1905. 

20. Penicillium aureum Corda, Prachtfl. 18138, Sacc. 
Syll. Fung. 4:82. Emended, Hedgcock, Mo. Bot. Gard. Rept. 
17:105-107, pi. 11, fig. 1-3. Colonies, gray, or sometimes blue 
green, changing to lemon yellow, or orange red; mycelium, 
dimorphus, filaments, 3/4 to 8/4 in diameter, cells sometimes swol¬ 
len or beaded; sterile hyphae, curled and distorted, lemon yel¬ 
low on acid media, orange red on alkaline, bearing exuded 
granules of a soluble pigment which is yellow with acid, and red 
with alkali; fertile hyphae, erect, 100/4 to 500/4 by 3/4, often with 
two sets of whorled branches, each branch averaging 12/4 by 2/4; 
conidia blue green, pointed oval 3/4 to 4/4 by 1.5/4 to 2/4, borne in 
simple chains of 40 to 80, containing a soluble blue green pig¬ 
ment, not changed in color by acids or alkalis; staining pine sap- 
wood yellow or red. Coremium forms often present on rich 
agar media. 

On the sapwood of Pinus strobus L., Ashland, Wisconsin, 
collected by PI. von Schrenk, April, 1905. 


Sept. 1906] Notes fro7n Mycological Literature 


211 


NOTES FROM MYCOLOGICAL LITERATURE. XXI. 

W. A. kellerman. 

Durand, Elias J. 

Elias J. Durand gives in the Jan. No. of the Journal 
of Mycology (1906) his conclusions from an extended study of 
Peziza fusicarpa Ger. and Peziza semitosta B. & C. He says 
these observations are based on about 50 separate collections, be¬ 
sides numerous ungathered plants in the field. He says: “My 
conclusions based upon a study of the material indicated may 
be stated briefly as follows: Peziza fusicarpa. Ger. (1873), P. 
pubida B. & C. (1875), and P. morgani Mass. (1902) are spe¬ 
cifically identical and synonymous; P. semitosta B. & C., while 
closely allied to P. pubida B. & C., is not identical with it, but is 
specifically distinct; P. hainesii Ell. (1881) is identical with P. 
semitosta B. & C. (1875), as recently stated by Ellis himself. 
(Jour. Mycol. 101170.)” 

Kellerman, W. A. 

Notes from Mycological Literature XIII-XVII, were 
given by W. A. Kellerman, in 1905, in the January, March, May, 
July and November Nos. of the Journal of Mycology. The gist 
of each article noted is stated in a single short paragraph, and 
every mycological paper published in this country, and the im¬ 
portant ones in foreign journals, are included. 

Kellerman, W. A. 

Uredinous Culture Experiments with Puccinia sorghi, 
1905, W. A. Kellerman, Journal of Mycology, Jan. 1906, notes 
experiments in April and May 1905, using teleutospores from 
sweet corn and obtaining Aecidia on Oxalis. An outline of pre¬ 
vious work with this Rust is given, — inoculation of the maize 
plant with material from teleutosporic pustules then was prob¬ 
ably due to the fact that a few uredospores viable were harbored 
by these sori. “Doubtless then the Rust of Maize is carried over 
from year to year in part by means of surviving uredospores. 

Missouri Botanical Garden, 16th Annual Report, 1905. 

The sixteenth Annual Report of the Missouri Bo¬ 
tanical Garden (1905) contains the following mycological ar¬ 
ticles : Perley Spaulding, A Disease of Black Oaks caused by 
Polyporus obtusus; Herman von Schrenck, On the Occurrence 
of Peronospora parasitica on Cauliflower; George Grant Hedg- 
cock, A Disease of Caulflower and Cabbage caused by Sclero- 
tinia; George Grant Hedgcock, A Disease of Cultivated Agaves 
due to Colletotrichum. 


212 


Journal of Mycology 


[Vol. 12 


Missouri Botanical Garden, 15th Annual Report, 1904. 

TWO MYCOLOGICAL ARTICLES APPEARED IN THE I5TII AN¬ 
NUAL Report of the Missouri Botanical Garden, 1904, namely: 
Perley Spaulding, Two fungi growing in holes made by wood¬ 
boring insects; and Wm. Trelease, Aberrant veil Remnants in 
some Edible Fungi. 

Missouri Botanical Garden, earlier Reports. 

In earlier volumes of the Reports of the Missouri Bo¬ 
tanical Garden mycological articles appeared as follows [12th 
Report, 1901] Hermann von Schrenk, A Disease of the Black 
Locust (Robinia Pseudacacia L) ; [nth Report, 1900] Hermann 
von Schrenk, A Disease of Taxodium distichum known as Pecki- 
ness, also a similar disease of Libocedrus decurrens known as 
Pinrot; [10th Report, 1899] Hermann von Schrenk, A sclero- 
toid Disease of Beech Roots; [9th Report] Wm. Trelease, A new 
Disease of Cultivated Palms. 

Arthur, J. C. 

J. C. Arthur's Cultures of Uredineae in 1904, see Jour¬ 
nal of Mycology, March 1905, involved 264 sowings of spores 
representing 40 species of rusts for which purpose were required 
119 species of hosts temporarily grown in pots in the greenhouse. 
A new description of Melampsora bigelowii Thiim. is furnished 
— this rust occurring on Salix amygdaloides Anderss. and many 
other species of Salix throughout the United States and Canada. 
A description of Aecidium clematitis Schw. is given, also of Puc- 
cinia stipae Arth., for which heretofore the aecidium had not 
been characterized (on Aster multiflorus Ait., A. ericoides L. & 
A. novae-angliae L). The summary gives a list of the success¬ 
ful cultures, 16 species previously reported and 5 reported now 
for the first time. The latter are quoted: “I. Melampsora bige¬ 
lowii Thuem. — Teleutospores on Salix amygdaloides Anders, 
sown on Larix decidua Mill.; 2. Puccinia tomipara Trel. — 

Teleutospores on Bromus ciliatus L. sown on Clematis Virginiana 
L.; 3. Puccinia stipae Arth. — Teleutospores on Stipa spartea 

Trin. sown on Aster multiflorus Ait., A. ericoides L., and A. 
Novae-An gliae L.; 4. Puccinia sorghi Schw. — Aecidiospores 

on Oxalis cymosa Small sown on Zea Mays L.; 5. Puccinia 

podophylli Schw. — Aecidiospores on Podophyllum peltatum L. 
sown on same host.” 

Kellerman, W. A. and Ricker, P. L. 

The First Supplement to New Genera of Fungi Pub¬ 
lished Since the Year 1900, with Citation and Original Descrip¬ 
tions, compiled by W. A. Kellerman and P. L. Ricker, gives the 
citation and reproduces the descriptions of nearly 100 genera 
most of which were published in 1904. The alphabetical arrange- 


Sept. 190(3] Notes froin Mycological Literature 


21a 


ments under large groups is the same in style as the first paper 
published the preceding year. See Journal of Mycology, March 
1905. 

Kellerman, W. A. 

The Uredineous Infection Experiments in 1904 by \V. 
A. Kellerman, Journal of Mycology, Jan. 1905, deals with cult¬ 
ures made with Puccinia sorghi Schw., on the six ‘agricultural 
species’ of maize and on Puccinia helianthi Schw., on many 
species of Helianthus, Peridermium pini on Campanula ameri- 
cana, and Puccinia thompsonii on Sambucus candensis. 

Kellerman, W. A. 

Ohio Fungi, Fascicle X, W. A. Kellerman, Journal of 
Mycology, Jan. 1905, gives (as in case of the nine preceding fas¬ 
cicles) the labels used for exsiccata. These indicate the host, lo¬ 
cality, date, collector, and reproduce verbatim et literatim the 
original description in each case. This set carries the serial No. 
up to 200. 

Morgan, A. P. 

A. P. Morgan gives a brief note on the Genus Gibel- 
lula Cavara in the March No. of the Journal of Mycology 
(1905), conjecturing the final disposition of the same, then adds 
a new species, namely, Gibellula capillaris Morgan n. sp., grow¬ 
ing out of very small dead insects among the old leaves in woods. 
There are as many as a dozen growing out of one small insect, 
curved and coiled about it like a bundle of hairs. 

Schrenk, Herman von. 

Herman von Schrenk reports On the Occurrence of 
Peronospora parasitica on Cauliflower, in the 16th Annual 
Report of the Missouri Botanical Garden, 1906. The interest 
centers in the fact of the very local and sporadic appearance of 
the Mildew on this host. Three half-tone plates illustrate dis¬ 
eased leaves. 

Hedgcock, George Grant. 

Geo. Grant Hedgcock publishes in the i6th Annual 
Report of the Missouri Botanical Garden (1905) a brief but 
interesting account of A Disease of Cauliflower and Cabbage 
caused by Sclerotinia. “Cultures carefully taken from the in¬ 
terior of decaying cauliflower stems, quite uniformly produced 
colonies of a fungus with a white fluffy mycelium. These were 
transferred and the fungus studied in all its stages and identified 
as Sclerotinia libertiana Fckl.” Three plates illustrate the spe¬ 
cies — showing apothecia, sclerotia, and pure cultures on agar 
slant tubes. 


214 


Journal of Mycology 


[Vol. 12 


Magnus, P. 

In “Notwendige Umanderung des Names der Pilzgattung 
Marssonia Fisch,” von P. Magnus, Hedwigia, Band XLV, Heft 
2, 16 Jan. 1906, it is noted that Marssonia is a phanerogamic 
genus instituted by H. Karsten in his Flora Columbia I (1858- 
1861), which antedates Fischer’s name Marssonia (1874) and 
that the correct spelling is with two s’s, instead of only one as 
given by Saccardo — the genus having been named for Th. Fr. 
Marsson, Apotheker in Greifswald. Magnus has accordingly 
changed the named of the genus of fungi from Marssonia to 
Marssonina. About two dozen American and all the other 
species are renamed. 

Beardslee, H. C. 

The “Amanitas of Sweden,” H. C. Beardslee, Journal of 
Mycology, Sept. 1905, is a report of observations of the pre¬ 
vious summer. They are notes outlining some of the impressions 
of an American mycologist, gained from a study of the Amanitas 
with which Fries and his associates were familiar. Nine species 
are included, viz., A. verna, muscaria, pantherina, spissa, ru- 
bescens, porphyria, mappa, strangulata, and vaginata. 

Atkinson, Geo. F. 

Geo. F. Atkinson gave in the November No. of the Journal 
of Mycology, 1905, an extended account of the “Genera Balan- 
sia and Dothicloe in the United States with a consideration of 
their Economic Importance.” It is based on a thorough study of 
the species; some descriptions and new names are given. The 
paper is illustrated by eight full page plates. 

Sydow, H. et P. 

The “Novae Fungorum species — III,” auctoribus H. et P. 
Sydow, includes eight species, three being from North Amer¬ 
ica, one from the Philipoines, one from Germany and three from 
South America. The following new genus is proposed: Bo- 
tryoconis Syd. nov. gen. Melanconiacearum — Acervuli primo 
subcutaeni (ut videtur), demum erumpentes, pulvinato-effusi. 
Conidia in capitula unita vel botryosoaggregata, colorata, con- 
tinua. — Drepanoconi Schroet. et P. Henn. vedetur affinis. 

Hoehnel, Franz v. 

“Mycologische Fragmente” von Prof. Dr. Franz v. Hoehnel 
in Wien, pertains to about eight species all of which have been 
critically studied. A new genus is proposed, namely, Unguicu- 
laria which unterscheidet sich von Pezizella und Dasyscypha, 
denen die Gattung am nachsten steht, durch die sehr dick- 
wandigen scharf spitzen Haare der Apothecien. 


Sept. 1906 ] Notes from Mycological Literature 


215 


Vuillemin, P. 

The “Recherches sur les Champignons parasites de feuilles 
de Tilleul” (Cercospora, Phyllosticta, Helminthosporium) par le 
Prof. P. Vuillemin, in Annales Mycologici, October 1905, notes a 
number of species which attack the Lindens. Cercospora micro- 
sora Sacc. (C. tiliae Peck) and Helminthosporium tiliae Fries 
are more fully discussed and text figures are given. Also a new 
species, from France is discussed: Phyllosticta bacteroides Vuill. 
n. sp. on living leaves of Tilia silvestris associated with Cerco¬ 
spora microsora. 

Sumstine, D. R. 

“Another Fly Agaric” is the title of a note by D. R. Sum¬ 
stine in the November No. of the Journal of Mycology, 1905. 
The author states that flies which had remained on plants of 
Amanita olitaria Bull, for a short time fell over dead. “After 
two hours the box was again examined, but the flies which once 
were dead were now alive and had departed with no more serious 
results possibly than a severe headache from their mycological 
‘booze.’ ” 

Dietel, P. 

In P. Dietel’s “Beschreibungen einiger neuer Uredineen,” 
total fourteen species, we find the following pertaining to North 
America: Puccinia caricis-polystachyae Diet. n. sp. on Carex 
polystachva Wahl., Mexico, and P. solidaginis-mollis Diet. n. 
sp. on leaves of Solidago mollis Bartl., Utah. 

Rick. 

Rick, Fungi austro-americani Fasc. Ill u IV. 43-80.” An¬ 
nales Mycologici, August. 1906. New species are: Nectria fol- 
lax Rick n. sp.; Erinella subcervina Bres. n. sp.; Rosellinia 
rickii Bres. n. sp.; Chlorosplenium atroviride Bres. n. sp.; Lem- 
bosia pachyasca Bres. n. sp. 

Fairman, Charles E. 

The “Pyrenomycetae novae in leguminibus Robiniae” by 
Charles E. Fairman, includes descriptions of the following new 
species : Leptosphaeria lyndonville; L. eustoma f. leguminosa; 
Metasphaeria lyndonvillae; M. leguminosa; and Pleospora au- 
reliana. 

Maire, Rene. 

The interesting article by Rene Maire in the August No. of 
Annales Mycologi, 1906, entitled “Notes Mycologique,” deals 
with about a dozen species. One that should be noted here per¬ 
haps is the parasite of Lactarius deliciosus given in Saccardo’s 
Sylloge as Hypomyces deformans, but is Peckiella lateritia (Fr.) 


216 


Journal of Mycology 


[Vol. 1 


R. Maire. The author found that the spores are verrucose but 
the cavity not divided, not septate as stated in the description. 
This species therefore is referred to the genus Peckiella. He 
gives the synonomy as follows. Sphaeria lateritia Fr. ; Hy- 
pomyces lateritius Tub; Hyp. vuilleminianus R. Maire; Peck¬ 
iella vuilleminiana Sacc. et Syd.; Sphaeria deformans Lagg.; 
Hypomyces deformans Sacc. Syll. “II est probable qu’un certain 
nombre d’autres Hypomyces devront aussi etre ranges dans le 
genre Peckiella lorque leurs spores auront ete mieux etudiees.” 

Morgan, A. P. 

A. P. Morgan gives in the January No. of the Journal 
of Mycology, 1905, a note on “Sphaeria Calva Tode,” and fur¬ 
nishes a new description of the plant under the name of Rossel- 
linia (Coniochaeta) calva Tode. 

Morgan, A. P. 

“A new Chaetosphaeria” (C. ludens Morgan n. sp.) is de¬ 
scribed in the May No. of the Journal of Mycology by A. P. 
Morgan. The plant was growing on old wood of Acer. 

Lawrence, W. H. 

W. H. Lawrence in “Notes on the Erysiphaceae” of Wash¬ 
ington, furnishes an annotated list of 17 species. 

Ellis, E. and Bartholomew, E. 

“Two new Haplosporellas”— PI. diatrypoides E. & B. and 
H. cercidis E. & B. — both collected by Mr. Bartholomew at Na- 
toma, Kansas, are described by J. B. Ellis and E. Bartholomew, 
in the Journal of Mycology, Mav 1905. 

Beardslee, H. C. 

H. C. Beardslee furnishes a brief account of the genus 
Clitopilus, a key to the common species. Two full-page plates 
and some notes on C. noveboracensis, C. abortivus, C. prunulus, 
and C. orcella, in the Journal of Mycology, May, 1905. The 
title of the article is “The Rosy spored Agarics or Rhodosporae.” 

Ricker, P. L. 

P. L. Ricker in “Notes on Fungi — II, With new species 
from various localities,” gives a description of new species as 
follows: Phyllosticta amphipterigii Ricker n. sp., Tilletia era- 
grostidis Clinton & Ricker, n. sp., Ustilago duthiei Ricker, n. 
sp., U. sieglingiae Ricker, n. sp., Puccinia aeluropi Ricker, n. 
sp., P. kreageri Ricker, n. sp., P. paradoxica Ricker, n. sp., P. 
piperi Ricker, n. sp., & P. leptospora n. sp. Puccinia actin- 
omeridis Magnus is P. verbesinae Schw. and the type host is not 
Actinomeris squarrosa but Vebesina occidentalis. See Journal of 
Mycology, May 1905. 


Sept. 1906 ] Notes from Mycological Literature 


217 


Hedgcock, George Grant. 

“A Disease of Cultivated Agaves due to Colletotrichum,” 
namely C. agaves Cav., is reported by George Grant Hedgcock 
(see 16th Rep. Mo. Bot. Gar. 1905) as occurring on leaves of 
A. americana, A. atrovirens, A. horrida, A. marmorota, A. po¬ 
tatorum, A. utahensis, and A. spp. — often causing the death of 
younger plants. No ascigerous stage was found. A half-tone 
plate shows a plant killed, and one partially killed by the fungus; 
another shows typical diseased areas with acervuli; and a third 
illustrates acervuli young and older, setae, conidiophores and 
conidia. 

Hasselbring, Heinrich. 

An experimental study has been made by Heinrich Hassel- 
fring of the “Appressoria of the Anthracnoses,” published in the 
August No. of the Botanical Gazette, 1906. These peculiar spore¬ 
like organs, produced by the germ tubes of spores, were recog¬ 
nized by Frank in 1883, who observed that they acted as hold¬ 
fasts. They were regarded by some investigators as “second¬ 
ary spores/’ but Frank first recognized the true nature of these 
bodies, and gave to all organs of this class the name appres¬ 
soria or adhesion organs. American writers on the bitter rot 
seem not to have regarded the work done by the foreign in¬ 
vestigators and in order to clear up the uncertainty expressed in 
the literature experiments and observations were made by Mr. 
Hasselbring whose summary affirms that these spore-like or¬ 
gans formed by the germ tubes of the anthracnose, are ad¬ 
hesion organs, by means of which the fungus is attached to the 
surface of its host during the early stage of infection. They are 
not suited for dissemination and therefore are not to be regarded 
as spores. The adhesion discs are formed as a result of stimuli 
from mechanical contact acting on the germ tubes. 

Bates, J. M. 

The “Rust notes for 1904” by J. M. Bates in the Journal 
of Mycology for May, 1905, deals principally with Puccinia on 
Distichlis stricta, a cosmopolitan rust, the aecidia on Chenopo- 
dium, Cleome and Lepidium. Reference is also made to Uro- 
myces astragali on Astragalus lotifforus nebraskensis Bates, A. 
plattensis and A. crassicarpus. 

Thom, Charles. 

Charles Thom gives “Some Suggestions from the study of 
Dairy Fungi” in the Journal of Mycology, May 1905. The paper 
attempts to present a plan for obtaining more definite knowledge 
of these forms by the dairy student in the use of his own methods. 


218 


Journal of Mycology 


[Vol. 12 


Morgan, A. P. 

“A New Species of Kalmusia” by A. P. Morgan, Kalmusia 
aspera Morgan n. sp. is described in the Tuly No. of the Journal 
of Mycology, 1905. The plant occurred on the hard wood of a 
prostrate trunk of Gleditsia. 

Morgan, A. P. 

A. P. Morgan gives a short note on “Peziza pubida B. & C.” 
in the Journal of Mycology, July 1905. 

Davis, J. J. 

J. J. Davis publishes “A New Species of Synchytrium” — S. 
scirpi Davis n. sp. on leaves of Scirpus atrovirens Muhl, Ke¬ 
nosha Co., Wisconsin. See Journal of Mycology, 11:154. PL 
78, July 1905. 

Hoi way, E. W. D. 

E. W. D. Holway gives “Notes on North American Salvia 
Rusts” as follows: Puccinia verti-septa Tracy and Gal., P. cauli- 
cola Tracy and Gal., P. mitrata Syd., P. griseola Lagh. Also 
new species, namely, Puccinia infrequens Holway n. sp. on Salvia 
albicans and S. chrysantha; and P. nivea Holway n. sp., on 
Salvia purpurea. 

Clevenger, Joseph F. 

The “Notes on some North American Phyllachoras” by 
Joseph F. Clevenger in Journal of Mycology, July 1905, pertains 
to Ph. trifolii, Ph. ambrosiae, Ph. diplocarpi, Ph. graminis, Ph. 
lespedezae, Ph. cornuospora, P. junci, illustrated by twenty-four 
outline drawings. 

Lawrence, W. H. 

“Blackspot Canker and Blackspot Apple Rot,” Macrophoma 
curvispora Peck, Gloeosporium malicorticis, Myxosporium curvis- 
porium (Peck) Sacc. in Litt., occurring in British Columbia, 
Western Oregon, and Western Washington where it is prevalent, 
also descriptive notes are given. See W. H. Lawrence in 
Journal of Mycology, July 1^05. 

Sumstine, D. R. 

Under the caption of “Gomphidius Rhodanthus Once More,” 
D. R. Sumtsine, in July No. of the Toumal of Mycology, 1905, 
gives the synonomy as follows: Clitocybe pelletieri Lev., Pax- 
illus paradoxus Cooke, Flammula paradoxa Kalch., Flammula 
Tammii Fr. And this is the proposed new name: Boletinus 
rhodanthus (Schw.) Sumstine n. n. 


Sept. 1906 ] Notes from Mycological Literature 


219 


Hedwigia, Band XLIV, Heft 4, Apr. 1905. 

In this No. of Hedwegia we find a single article to note, 
viz., Lichenologisches, von Max Britzelmayer. The subheads 
of the article are: I. Lichenen vom ITochfelln und Hochgern; 
II. Cladonia gracilis L.; III. Cladonia rangiformis Hoff.; IV. 
Secidella goniophila Flk. 

Rabenhorst’s Kryptogamen-flora, Pilze, 100. Liferung, 30 Aug. 
1906. 

The 100 Lieferung of Rabenhorst’s Kryptogamen-flora (by 
Dr. G. Lindau) issued 30 Aug. 1906, completes the genus Ra- 
mularia; also the Abteilung Hyalohelicosporaeae and Hvalos- 
taurosporae. The family Dematiaceae is then taken up, the 
Unterabteilung Coniosporeae completed and the Unterabteilung 
Toruleae begun. New species described are: Ramularia helvetica 
on hieracium albidum; R. hamburgensis on Hieracium vulgatum; 
Coniosporium caricis-montanae on Carex montana, C. papyricola; 
Fusella typhae on dead leaves of typha latifolia. 

Annales Mycologici, vol. IV. No. 4. Aug. 1906 

The contents of Annales Mycologici, Aug. 1906, are: Dietel, 
P., Beschreibungen einiger neuer Uredineen ; Rick, Fungi austro- 
americani Fasc. III. u. IV; Fitch, Ruby, The Action of Insol¬ 
uble Substances in Modifying the Effect of Deleterious Agents 
upon the Fungi; McAlpine, D., Australian Acacia Rusts with 
their specific Hosts; McAlpine, D., A new Aecidium on Acacia; 
Fairman, Charles E., Pyrenomycetae novae in leguminibus Ro- 
biniae; Maire, Rene, Notes mycologiques; Rehm, H., Asco- 
mycetes novi; Rehm. Zum Gedachtnis an J. B. Ellis; Sydow, 
H. et P., Novae Fungorum species — III; Neue Literatur; Re- 
ferate und Kritische Besprechungen. 

Rehm, H. 

Under “Ascomycetes novi” H. Rehm describes in Annales 
Mycologici, August 1906, (1) Ascomycetes Americae borealis, 
seven species; (2) Ascomycetes hungarici, three species; (3) 
Discomyces gallicus, one species; (4) Discomyces graecus, one 
species; (5) Pyrenomyces Africae autralis, one species. 

Fink, Bruce. 

In an article in the Bryologist for March 1906 (9:21-4), 
Bruce Fink gives “Further Notes on Cladonias VI,” discussing 
Cladonia cariosa, Cladonia cariosa corticata Wainio, and Cladoniq 
squammulosa (Mull.) Wainio. 


220 


Journal of Mycology 


[Vol. 12 


VanHook, J. M. 

“Ascochyti pisi, a Disease of seed peas,” published in the 
Ohio Naturalist for April 1906 (6:507-512) by J. M. Van 
Hook, reports the exceptional blighting of peas throughout Ohio 
during the season of 1904 and 1905. It is noted as the most 
important thing in connection with the life history of the fungus, 
that it grows through the husk into the seed. Frequently, when 
the pod contains no seed, the mycelium will grow through, form¬ 
ing similar spots on both sides of the pod. When the mycelium 
passes into the seeds brown spots are formed on the surface. 
Pycnidia are formed on the dead areas of the stems, leaves, 
pods, and seed, and even on the dead stems and branches. Cul¬ 
tures are reported; also seed treatment with mercuric chloride 
and with formalin, the results for the most part not only un¬ 
successful but negative. As hosts are named all the examined 
varieties of the common pea; but the reported hosts Medicago 
sativum, Cicer arietinum, Phaseolus vulgaris and Vicia villosa 
were here free. 

Holway, E. W. D. 

E. W. D. Holway gives in the Journal of Mycology, Nov. 
1905, “Notes on Uredineae IV,” these being Puccinia unifor- 
mis Pam. & Hume; P. oblicus B. & C.; P. fragilis Tracy & 
Gal.; P. purpusii P. Hen.; P. arabicola E. & E.; and Uromyces 
oblonga Vize. 

Sturgis, W. C. 

W. C. Sturgis, under the title “Remarkable occurrence of 
Morchella escalenta (L.) Pers,” says: “On September nth the 
writer was skirting the precipitous side of a mountain at an 
altitude of about 7,000 feet, and while passing through what 
had been a fairly good growth of aspens and small spruces, a few 
fine specimens of Morchella were noticed. Further search re¬ 
vealed the presence of these plants literally in hundreds. A fire 
had passed across the mountain in June, 1904, leaving only 
skeletons of the trees standing and charring the ground to 
such a depth that no trace of green vegetation had since ap¬ 
peared. Yet under these unfavorable circumstances and at a 
season when snow had already fallen not far from the locality, 
a bushel of Morchellas might have been gathered within a radius 
of one hundred yards.” See Journal of Mycology, November 

1905- 

Sherman, Helen. 

Helen Sherman gives the “Host plants of Panaeolus epi- 
mvces Peck,” in the Journal of Mycology, July 1905, with a full 
page illustration, showing a well-developed plant attached to 
its host, a later stage of the same, also very young carpaphore. 


Sept. 1 S 06 ] Index to North American Mycology 


221 


INDEX TO NORTH AMERICAN MYCOLOGY. 

Alphabetical List of Articles, Azithors , Subjects , New Species and 

Hosts , New Names and Synonyms . 

W. A. KEEEERMAN. 

(Continued from page 128.) 

Acer sp., branches, host to Valsa rhodospora Sacc. n. sp. Ann. 
Mycolog. 4:275. 5 June 1906. 

Acer, cortex, host to Diplodina anomala Sacc. n. sp. Ann. My¬ 
colog. 4:277. 5 June 1906. 

Acer, trunk, host to Naemosphaera fairmani Sacc. n. sp. Ann. 
Mycolog. 4:276. 5 June 1906. 

Achillea ptarmica, host to Hypoderma ptarmicola Fairman n. 
sp. Proc. Rochester Acad. Sci. 4:216. March 1906. 

Adenostoma fasciculatum, host to Polystigma adenostomatis 
Farlow n. sp. Ellis & Everhart’s Fungi Columbiani No. 2049. 
1905. 

Agariceae [sub-family of Polyporaceae] Key to, of Temperate 
North America. William A. Murrill. Torreya, 6:213-4. 
Dec. 1905. 

Agaricus campestris, see Development of [ abstract ] . . . 
Agaricus nigripes Schw., syn. of Heliomyces nigripes q. v. 
Agaves, cultivated, Disease of, see Disease of . . . 

Aguacate, see Persea gratissima. . . . 

Ailanthus glandulosa Desf., host to Diaporthe ailanthi mega- 
cerasphora Fairman n. var. Proc. Rochester Acad. Sci. 4:220. 
March 1906. 

Algunos Hongos Cubanos [about 2 dozen new species, diagnoses 
in Spanish language)] F. S. Earle. Informe Anual Estac. 
Cen. Agronom. Cuba, 1 \22$-2^2. PI. XXXI-XLII. 1 
June 1906. 

Alternaria sp. indescr. — A New Apple Rot. B. O. Longyear. 
Col. Agr. Exp. Sta. Bull. 105:1-12. Nov. 1905. 

Amauroderma Murrill n. gen. Polyporaceae, type Amauroderma 
regulicolor (Cke.) Murr. Bull. Torr. Bot. Club. 32:366. 
July 1905. 

Amauroderma coffeatum (Berk.) Murrill n. n. [Polyporus cof- 
featus Berk.] Bull. Torr. Bot. Club, 32:367. July 1905. 

Amauroderma chaperi (Pat.) Murrill n. n. [Ganoderma chaperi 
Pat.] Bull. Torr. Bot. Club, 32:367. July 1905. 
Amauroderma regulicolor (Cke.) Murrill n. n. [Fomes reguli¬ 
color Cke.] Bull. Torr. Bot. Club, 32:367. July 1905. 


222 


Jouryial of Mycology 


[Vol. 12 


American Mycological Society, New Orleans meeting, January 
i, 1906. Report of the Secretary, C. L. Shear. Jour. Mycol. 
12:85-6. Mar. 1906. 

Amphisphaeria abietina Fairman n. sp., on bark of some fallen 
tree in the woods. Proc. Rochester Acad. Sci. 4:219. March 
1906. 

Amphisphaeria aeruginosa Fairman n. sp., on old board (Tilia) 
lying on the ground. Proc. Rochester Acad. Sci. 4:221. 
March 1906. 

Amphisphaeria bertiana Fairman n. sp., in moist cavities in the 
end of a rotten log. Proc. Rochester Acad. Sci. 4:217. 
March 1906. 

Amphisphaeria polymorpha Rehm n. sp., on bark of fallen log, 
probably Ulmus. Proc. Rochester Acad. Sci. 4:222. March 
1906. 

Anemone tetonensis, host to Pyrenophora ampla Syd. n. sp. 

Ann. Mycolog. 4:343* Aug. 1906. 

Anona cherimolia, host to Bonanseja mexicana Sacc. n. sp. Jour. 
Mycol. 12:51. Mar. 1906. 

Anthrocnoses, see Appressoria of . . . 

Annularia sphaerospora Peck, n. sp., decaying wood of elm. 
Bull. Torr. Bot. Club, 33:216. Apr. 1906. 

Apple Rot, A New [Alternaria sp. indescr.] Col. Agr. Exp. Sta. 
Bull. 105:1-12. Nov. 1905. 

Appressoria of the Anthracnoses. Heinrich Hasselbring. Bot. 
Gaz. 42:135-142. August 1906. 

Aouilegia leptocera, host to Excipula rostrata Syd. n. sp. Ann. 
Mycolog. 4:344. Aug. 1906. 

Arctostaphylus tomentosa, Madrona de arbol, host to Gloeo- 
sporium apiosporium Sacc. n. sp. Jour. Mycol. 12:51. Mar. 
1906. 

Arthur, J. C. On the Nomenclature of Fungi Having Many 
Fruit-forms. Plant World, 8:71-76, 99-103. Mar. & Apr. 
1905. 

Arthur, Joseph Charles & Kern, Frank Dunn. North American 
Species of Peridermium. Bull. Torr. Bot. Club, 33 :403-438. 
Aug. 1906. 

Arthur, J. C. & Kern, F. D. North American Species of Peri¬ 
dermium [Abstract]. Science N. S. 23:203. 9 Feb. 1906. 

Armillaria mellea, see Development of [abstract] . . . 

Asclepias verticillata, host to Rhabdospora demetriana Bubak 
n. sp. Jour. Mycol. 12:55. Mar. 1906. 

Ascochyta pisi — a disease of Seed Peas, J. M. Van Hook. Ohio 
Naturalist, 6:507-512. Apr. 1906. 


Sept. 1906 ] Index to North American Mycology 


223 


Ascomycetes, Ascus and Spore Formation in, see Development 
of Ascus. . . . 

Ascus and Spore Formation in the Laboulbeniaceae, A Prelim¬ 
inary Note on. J. Horace Faull. Science N. S. 23:152-3. 
26 Jan. 1906. 

Ash, Charles S. and Twight, E. H., see Dwight, E. H. and . . . 
Asparagus Rust, Asparagus and, in California. Ralph E. Smith. 
Calif. Agr. Exp. Sta. B.ull. 165 11-99, Jan. 1905. 

Asparagus Rust control, Further experiments in. Ralph E. 
Smith. Calif. Agr. Exp. Sta. Bull. 172:1-21. Jan. 1906. 

Aspergillosis — caused by Aspergillus fumigatus [Note]. Plant 
World, 8:128-130. May 1905. 

Atkinson, Geo. F. Outlines for the observation of some of the 
more common Fungi. Plant World, 8:215-222, 245-255. 
Sept. & Oct. 1905. 

Atkinson, Geo. F. The Development of Armillaria mellea; The 
Development of Agaricus compestris [abstract]. Science N. 
S. 23 :203. 9 Feb. 1906. 

Aurantiporellus Murrill n. gen. Polyporaceae, type Poly- 
porus alboluteus Ell. & Ev. Bull. Torr. Bot. Club, 32:486. 
Sept. 1905. 

Aurantiporellus alboluteus (E. & E.) Murrill n. n. [Fomes 
alboluteus E. & E.] Bull. Torr. Bot. Club, 32:486. Sept. 
1905. 

Aurantiporus Murrill n. gen. Polyporaceae, type Polyporus 
pilotae Schw. Bull. Torr. Bot. Club, 32 487. Sept. 1905. 

Aurantiporus pilotae (Schw.) Murrill n. n. [Polyporus pilotae 
Schw., P. pini-canadensis Schw., P. hypococinnus Berk.] 
Bull. Torr. Bot. Club, 32:487. Sept. 1905. 

Bacillus amylovorus (Burr.) de Toni, see Blight Canker . . . 
Bactridium minutum Sacc. n. sp. ad ligno putrescentia dejecta 
in silvis. Ann. Mycolog. 4:277. 5 June 1906. 

Basidiomycetes, binucleated cells in, see Nature and Origin . . . 
Bates, J. M. Rust Notes for 1905. Jour. Mycol. 12:45-47. 
Mar. 1906. 

Bessey, Ernest A. Dilophospora alopecuri [Notes on Dilopho- 
spora alopecuri (Fr.) Fr., on Calamagrostis canadensis, in 
Wisconsin]. Jour. Mycol. 12:57-8. Mar. 1906. 

Betula sp., host to Erostella transversa Sacc. et Fairm. Jour. 
Mycol. 12:48. Mar. 1906. 

Binucleated Cells in some Basidiomycetes, see Nature and 
Origin ... 

Blight of Potatoes,Phytophthora [Clinton], see Downy Mil¬ 
dew . . . 


224 Journal of Mycology [Vol. 12 

Blight, Peronoplasmopara cubensis (B. & C.) Clint., see Downy 
Mildew . . . 

Blight Canker of Apple Trees [Bacillus amylovorus (Burr.) de 
Toni] H. H. Whetzel. Cornell Univ. Agr. Exp. Sta. Bull. 
236:99-138. Feb. 1906. 

Blinn, Philo K. A Rust [Macrosporium cucumerinum]-Re- 
isisting Cantaloupe. Col. Agr. Exp. Sta. Bull. 104:1-15. PI. 
V-X . Nov. 1905. 

Bonanseja Sacc. n. gen. [Est quasi Pseudopeziza Sphaero- 
phaeospora]. Jour. Mycol. 12:50. Mar. 1906. 

Bonanseja mexicana Sacc n. sp., in foliis languidis v. emortuis 
Anonae cherimoliae, [Mexico]. Jour. Mycol. 12:51. Mar. 
1906. 

Books for sale from the library of J. B'. Ellis, list. Jour. Mycol. 
12 :86~7. Mar. 1906. 

Boletus pini Thore, syn. of Porodciedalea pini q. v. 

Boletus resupinatus Sw., non FI. Dan., syn. of Fomitella supina 
q. v. 

Boletus supina Sw., syn. of Fomitella supina q. v. 

Boletus tulipiferae Schw., syn. of Irpiciporus tulipifera q. v. 
Boletus villosus Sw., syn. of Funalia villosa q. v. 

Bubak, Fr. Einige Neue Pilze aus Nord Amerika. Jour. Mycol. 
12:52-6. Mar. 1906. 

Camarosporium lyndonvillae Sacc. n. sp., in ramulis Hibisci 
syriaoi. Ann. Mycolog. 4:277. 5 June 1906. 

Carex polystachya Wahl, host to Puccinia caricis-polystachya*} 
Diet. n. sp., [Mexico]. Ann. Mycolog. 4:306. Aug. 1906. 

Carex sp., host to Pseudostegia nubilosa Bubak n. sp. Jour. 
Mycol. 12:56. Mar. 1906. 

Carnation Rust, The effect of different soils on the develop¬ 
ment of. John L. Sheldon. Bot. Gaz. 40:225-9. Sept. 
1905. 

Carya tomentosa, host to Phyllosticta convexula Bubak n. sp. 
Jour. Mycol. 12:52. Mar. 1906. 

Casimiroa edulis, Zapote bianco, host to Cercospora coloroides 
Sacc. n. sp. [Mexico]. Jour. Mycol. 12:52. Mar. 1906. 

Cauliflower, Occurrence of Peronospora parasitica on, see 
Peronospora . . . 

Cause of Freak Peas, [Ascochyta pisi Lib.] J. M. VanHook. 
Torreya, 6:67-9. April 1906. 

Ceanothus velutinus, host to Harknessia aggregata Syd. n. sp. 
Ann. Mycolog. 4:344. Aug. 1906. 


Sept. 1906 ] Index to North American Mycology 


225 


Cercospora coloroides Sacc. n. sp. in foliis languidis Casimiroae 
edulis vulgo Zapote bianco. [Mexico.] Jour. Mycol. 12152. 
Mar. 1906. 

Ceratostoma fairmani Sacc. n. sp., in truncis putridis. Jour. 
Mycol. 12 149. Mar. 1906. 

Cerrenella Murrill n. gen. Polyporaceae, type Irpex tabacinus 
B. & C. Bull. Torr. Bot. Club, 32:361. July 1905. 

Cerrenella coriacea (B. & Rav.) Murrill n. n. [Irpex coriaceus, 
Hydnum trachydon Lev., Irpex trachydon B. & C.] Bull. 
Torr. Bot. Club, 32:361. July 1905. 

Cerrenella tabacina (B. & C.) Murrill n. n. [Irpex tabacinus 
B. & C.] Bull. Torr. Bot. Club, 32:361. July 1905. 

Chamberlain, Charles. Megaspore or Macrospore (Mega, Gr. 
me gas, great or large, is the opposite of micro; Macro, Gr. 
macros, means long, not the opposite of micro but of brachus 
meaning short.) Science, N. S. 23:819. 25 May 1906. 

Chemotropism of Fungi. Harry R. Fulton. Bot. Gaz. 41:8i- 
108. Feb. 1906. 

Christman, A. H. Observations on the Wintering of Grain 
Rusts. Trans. Wise. Acad. Sci. Arts & Let. 15 *.98-107. 1904. 
Issued 1905. 

Ciboria nyssaegena Sacc. Syll., syn. of Sclerotinia nyssaegena 
q. v. 

Ciboria johnsonii E. & E., syn. of Sclerotinia johnsonii q. v. 

Cladonias, Further Notes on, VI. Bruce Fink. The Bryologist, 
9:21-4. Mar. 1906. 

Cladonias, Further Notes on, V. Cladonia gracilis. Bruce Fink. 
Bryologist, 8:37-41. May 1905. 

Cladotrichum simplex Sacc. n. sp., ad ligna putrescentia in sil- 
vis. Ann Mycolog. 4:278. 5 June 1906. 

Classification of Lichens [referring particularly to treatment 
in Pflanzenfamilien by Fiinfstiick and Zahlbruckner]. Al¬ 
bert Schneider, Torreya, 5 *.79-82. May 1905. 

Clinton, G. P. Downv Mildew, or Blight. Peronoplasmopara 
cubensis (B. & C.) Clint, of Musk Melons and Cucumbers. 
Conn. Agr. Exp. Sta. Report, 1904:329-362. PI. XXIX- 
XXXI. May 1905. 

Clinton, G. P. Downy Mildew, or Blight, Phytophthora in- 
festans (Mont.) DeBy., of Potatoes. Conn. Agr. Exp. Sta. 
Rep. 1904:363-384. PI. XXXII-XXXVII. May 1905. 

Clinton, G. P. Notes on Fungus Diseases, etc., for 1904. Conn. 
Agr. Exp. Sta. Report 1904:311-328. PI. XVIII-XXVIII. 
May 1905. 

Clinton, G. P. Report of the Botanist. Conn. Agr. Exp. Sta. 
Report, 1904:311-384. PI. XVIII-XXXVII. May 1905. 


226 


Journal of Mycology 


[Vol. 12 


Cobb, N. A. Gumming of the Sugar Cane [Pseudomonas vas- 
cularum]. Rep. Exp. Sta. of the Hawaiian Sugar Planters’ 
Assoc. Division of Pathology and Physiology, Bull. 3:1-46. 
Honolulu 1905. 

Colletotrichum Agaves, Disease, see Disease of cultivated . . . 

•Collybia brunnescens Peck, n. sp., in open places or in thin 
woods. Bull. Torr. Bot. Club, 33:214. Apr. 1906. 

Color production, Some Factors concerned in the, in a species of 
Fusarium. J. B. Pollock. Science, N. S. 23:422~3. 16 

Mar. 1906. 

•Coniothyrium olivaceum Bon. apud Fuck. var. tecomae Sacc. n. 
var., in ramis morientibus Tecomae radicantis. Ann. My- 
colog. 4:276. 5 June 1906. 

Contributions to the recorded Fungus and Slime-Mould Flora 
of Long Island. [List of 20 species.] G. A. Reichling. 
Torreya, 5 185-7. May 1905. 

Cook, Melville T., Informe del Departamento de Patologia Vege¬ 
tal [general account in Spanish of a few parasitic fungi and 
insects]. Primer Informe An. Estacion Cen. Agronom. 
Cuba, 1 :147-207. 1 June 1906. 

Cook, Melville Thurston and Horne, William Titus. Fungous 
Diseases [of Coffee in Cuba]. Estacion Cen. Agr. de Cuba, 
Bull. 3:16-19. PI. V. Sept. 1905. 

Coriolellus Murrill n. gen. Polyporaceae, type Trametes sepi- 
um Berk. Bull. Torr. B'ot. Club, 32:481. Sept. 1905. 

Coriolellus sepium (Berk.) Murrill n. n. [Trametes sepium 
Berk.] Bull. Torr. Bot. Club, 32:481. Sept. 1905. 

Coriolopsis Murrill n. gen. Polyporaceae, type Polyporus occi- 
dentalis Kl. Bull. Torr. Bot. Club, 32:358. July 1905. 

Coriolopsis crocata (Fr.) Murrill n. n. [Polyporus crocatus 
Fr., P. byrsinus Mont., Polystictus crocatus Fr.] Bull. Torr. 
Bot. Club, 32 :358. July 1905. 

Coriolopsis gibberulosa (Lev.) Murrill n. n. [Polyporus gib- 
berulosus Lev., Polystictus extensus Cooke.] Bull. Torr. 
B'ot. Club, 32:359. July 1905. 

Coriolopsis occidentalis (Kl.) Murrill n. n. [Polyporus occi- 
dentalis Kl., P. lenis Lev., Polystictus cyclodes Fr.] Bull. 
Torr. Bot. Club, 32:358. July 1905. 

Craterellus pogonati Peck, n. sp., on moss, Pogonatum alpinum 
Roehl. Bull. Torr. Bot. Club, 33:218. Apr. 1906. 

Crepidotus (Nees) S. F. Gray, not Crepidotus (Fr.) Quel., 
Pleurotus (Clytocybarii & Eu-Pleurotus) Sacc. Syll. In¬ 
forme An. Estac. Agronom. Cuba, 1 ^35. 1 June 1906. 

Crepidotus lentinoides Earle n. sp. [Cuba.] Informe An. Estac. 
Agronom. Cuba, 1:236. 1 June 1906. 


Sept. 1906 ] Index to North American Mycology 


227 


Cronartium quercuum (Berk.) Peridermium cerebrum Peck, 
and. [Cultures, etc.] C. L. Shear. Jour. Mycol. 12:89-92. 
May 1906. 

Crown-Gall and Hairy-Root Diseases of the Apple Tree. George 
G. Hedgcock. U. S. Dept. Agr. Bureau PI. Industry, Bull. 
90:1-7. PI. I-III. 17 Nov. 1905. 

Cryptosporium nubilosum E. & E., syn. of Pseudostegia nubi- 
losa q. v. 

Cubamyces Murrill n. gen. Polyporaceae, type Polyporus cu- 
bensis Mont. Bull. Torr. Bot. Club, 32:480. Sept. 1905. 

Cubamyces cubensis (Mont.) Murrill n. n. [Polyporus cuben- 
sis Mont.] Bull. Torr. Bot. Club, 32:480. Sept. 1905. 

Culture Medium for the Zygospores of Mucor stolonifer. J. 

I. Hamaker. Science, N. S. 23 :7io. 4 May 1906. 

Cytological Studies on the Entomophthoraceae. I, The Morph¬ 
ology and Development of Empusa. Edgar W. Olive. B'ot. 
Gaz. 41:192-206. PI. XIV-XV. Mar. 1906. 

Cytological Studies of Entomophthoraceae. II, Nuclear and 
Cell Division of Empusa. Edgar W. Olive. Bot. Gaz. 
41 .-229-260. PI. XVI. Apr. 1906. 

Cytology of the Entomophthoraceae. Lincoln Ware Riddle. 
Proc. Am. Acad. Arts & Sci. 42:177-198. PI. 1-3. August 
1906. 

Daedalea pini Fr., syn. of Porodaedalea pini q. v. 

Deleterious Agents upon the Fungi; the Action of insoluble 
substances in Modifying the effect of. Ruby Fitch. Ann. 
Mycolog. 4:313-322. Aug. 1906. 

Dendrophagus colossus (Fr.) Murrill n. n. [Polyporus colos¬ 
sus Fr.] Bull. Torr. Bot. Club, 32:473. Sept. 1905. 

Dendrophagus Murrill n. gen. Polyporaceae, type Polyporus 
colossus Fr. Bull. Torr. Bot. Club, 32 473. Sept. 1905. 

Denniston, H. R. Russulas of Madison and Vicinity. Trans. 
Wise. Acad. Sci. Arts & Let. 15:71-88. 1904 (issued 1905). 

Development of Armillaria mellea and of Agaricus cainpestris 
[abstract]. G. F. Atkinson. Science, N. S. 23:203. 9 Feb. 
1906. 

Development of Ascus and Spore Formation in Ascomycetes. 

J. Horace Faull. Proc. Boston Soc. Nat. Hist. 32:77-113, 
PI. 7-11. June 1905. 

Diaporthe ailanthi megacerasphora Fairman n. var., on dead or 
rotten limbs of Ailanthus glandulosa Desf. Proc. Rochester 
Acad. Sci. 4:220. March 1906. 

Dichomera prunicola Ell. & Dearn. n. sp., on prunus virginiana, 
No. 2021, Fungi Columbiani. 20 March 1905. 


228 


Journal of Mycology 


[Vol. 12 


Didymella arthoniaespora Rehm n. sp., on bark of some fallen 
tree in the woods. Proc. Rochester Acad. Sci. 4:221. March 
1906. 

Dilophosphora alopecuri. [Notes on Dilophospora alopecuri 
(Fr.) Fr. on Calamagrostis canadensis, in Wisconsin]. 
Ernst A. Bessey. Jour. Mycol. 12:57-8. Mar. 1906. 

Diplodina anomala Sacc. n. sp., in cortice atrato Aceris sp. Ann. 
My colog. 4:277. 5 June 1906. 

Disease of Black Oaks caused by Polyorus obtusus Berk. Per- 
ley Spaulding. An. Rep. Mo. Bot. Gard. 16:109-116. PI. 
13-19. 1905. 

Disease of Cauliflower and Cabbage caused by Sclerotinia. 
George Grant Hedgcock. An. Rep. Mo. Bot. Gard. 16:149- 
151. PI. 32-4. 1905. 

Disease of Cultivated Agaves due to Colletotrichum. George 
Grant Hedgcock. An. Rep. Mo. Bot. Gar. 16:153-6. PI. 
35 - 37 - 1905 - 

Disease of Seed Peas, see Ascochyta a Disease of . .. 

Disease Resistance of Potatoes [experiments; not taxonomic]. 
Wm. Stuart, Vt. Agr. Exp. Sta. Bull. 122:107-136. Apr. 
1906. 

Diseases of the Apple, Cherry, Peach, Pear and Plum. E. Mead 
Wilcox. Ala. Agr. Exp. Sta. Bull. 132:75-142. PI. I-IX. 
Apr. 1905. 

Diseases, Three Fungous, of the Cultivated Ginseng [Vermicu- 
laria dematium; Pestalozzia funera; Neocosmospora vasin- 
fecta.] Howard S. Reed. Mo. Agr. Exp. Sta. Bull 69:43-65. 
Oct. 1905. 

Diseases, Tomato, in California, see Tomato Diseases. . . . 

Douglas, Gertrude E. The Rate of Growth of Panaeolus re- 
tirugis. Torreva, 6:157-165. Aug. 1905. 

Downy Mildew, or Blight. Peronoplasmopara cubensis (B. & 
C.) Clint, of Musk Melons and Cucumbers. G. P. Clinton. 
Conn. Agr. Exp. Sta. Report 1904:329-362. PI. XXIX- 
XXXI. May 1905. 

Downy Mildew, or Blight, Phytophthora infestans (Mont.) 
DeBy., of Potatoes. G. P. Clinton. Conn. Agr. Exp. Sta. 
Rep. 1904:363-384. PI. XXXII-XXXVII. May 1905. 

Drymocallis glandulosa (Lindl.) Rydb. host to Marssonia po- 
tentillae helleri Peck, n. var., Bull. Torr. Bot. Club, 33 :2I9. 
Apr. 1906. 

Earle, F. S. Algunos Hongos Cubanos [about two dozen new 
species, diagnoses in Spanish language]. Informe An. Estac. 
Cen. Agronom. Cuba, 1 '.22^2^2. PI. XXXI-XLTI. 1 June 
1906. 


Sept. 1906 ] Index to North American Mycology 


229 


Earliella ctibensis Murrill n. sp., on a decayed fallen deciduous 
log in rather moist woods, Cuba Jamaica, Nicaragua. Bull. 
Torr. Bot. Club, 321479. Sept. 1905. 

Earliella Murrill n. gen. Polyporaceae, type Earliella cuben- 
sis Murrill. Bull. Torr. Bot. Club, 32:478. Sept. 1905. 

Einige neue Pilze aus Nord America. Fr. Bubak. Jour. Mycol. 
12:52-6. Mar. 1906. 

Ellis, J. B. A New Rossellinia from Nicaragua, R. Bakeri. 
Torreya, 5 :8y. May 1905. 

Ellis Job Bicknell, Obituary, W. A. Kellerman, Jour. Mycol. 
12:41-5. Mar. 1906. 

Elm, host to Annularia sphaerospora Peck, n. sp., Bull. Torr. 
Bot. Club, 33:216. Apr. 1906. 

Empusa, Nuclear and Cell Division of. Edgar W. Olive. Bot. 
Gaz. 41 1229-260. PI. XVI. Apr. 1906. 

Empusa, the Morphology and Development of. Edgar W. Olive. 
Bot. Gaz. 41:192-206. PI. XIV-XV. Mar. 1906. 

Entomophthoraceae, Cytological Studies, see Cytological . . 

Entomophthoraceae, Cytology of, see Cytology of the 
Entomophthora “x” [undescribed form, Lincoln Ware Riddle]. 
Proc. Am. Acad. Arts and Sci. 42:179. August 1906. 

Epicoccum torquens Massee n. sp., parasitic on Weissia viridula. 
Torreya 6149. Mar. 1906. 

Erostella transversa Sacc. et. Fairm. n. sp., in cortice Betulae 
sp. Jour. Mycol. 12148. Mar. 1906. 

Erysiphe graminis DC., Infection Experiments, see Infection. 

Erythronium parvifiorum, host to Uromyces heterodermus Syd. 
n. sp. Ann. Mycolog. 4:30. Feb. 1906. 

Excipula rostrata Syd. n. sp., in caulibus emortius Aquilegiae 
leptoceratis. Ann Mycolog. 4:344. Aug. 1906. 

Fagus americana, host to Fairmania singularis Sacc. n. sp. Ann. 
Mycolog. 4:276. 5 June 1906. 

Fairman, Charles E. New or Rare Pyrenomyceteae from West¬ 
ern New York. Proc. Rochester Acad. Sci. 4:215-224, PI. 
XX-XXII. March 1906. 

Fairman, Charles E. Pyrenomyceteae novae in leguminibus 
Robiniae. Ann. Mycolog. 4:326-8. Aug. 1906. 

Fairmania Sacc. new gen. Sphaeroidacearum. Ann. Mycolog. 
4:276. 5 June 1906. 

Fairmania singularis Sacc. n. sp., in ligno putrescente Fagi 
americanae. Ann. Mycolog. 4:276. 5 June 1906. 


230 Journal of Mycology [Vol. 12 

Faull, J. Horace. A Preliminary Note on Ascus and Spore For¬ 
mation in the Laboulbeniaceae. Science, N. S. 23:152-3. 26 
Jan. 1906. 

Faull, J. Horace. Development of Ascus and Spore Formation 
in Ascomycetes. Proc. Boston Soc. Nat. Hist. 32:77-113. 
PI. 7-11. June 1905. 

Favolus villosus Fr., syn. of Funalia villosa q. v. 

Fermentation, Contribution to the Study of. E. H. Twight 
and Charles S. Ash. Calif. Agr. Exp. Sta. Bull. 159:1-26. 
June 1904. 

Fink, Bruce. Further Notes on Cladonias, V, Cladonia gracilis. 
Bryologist, 8:37-41. May 1905. 

Fink, Bruce. Further Notes on Cladonias, VI. The Bryologist, 
9:21-4. Mar. 1906. 

Fink, Bruce. How to Collect and Study Lichens. Bryologist, 
8:22-7. March 1905. 

Fink, Bruce. What to Note in the Macroscopic Study of Li¬ 
chens. Bryologist, 8:73-6. July 1905. 

Fitch, Ruby. The Action of Insoluble Substances on Modifying 
the Effect of Deleterious Agents upon the Fungi. Ann. 
Mycolog. 4:313-322. Aug. 1906. 

Flammula condense Peck, n. sp., in clearings in pine woods and 
on stony hills. Bull. Torr. Bot. Club, 33:217. Apr. 1906. 

Flaviporellus Murrill 11. g. Polyporaceae, type Polyporus split- 
gerberi Mont. Bull. Torr. Bot. Club, 32:485. Sept. 1905. 

Flaviporellus splitgerberi (Mont.), Murrill n. n. [Polyporus 
splitgerberi Mont., P. sulphuratus Fr., P. rheicolor B. & C.] 
Bull. Torr. Bot. Club, 32:486. Sept. 1905. 

Flaviporus Murrill n. gen. Polyporaceae, type Polyporus rufo- 
flavus B. & C. Bull. Torr. Bot. Club, 32:360. July 1905. 

Flaviporus crocitinctus (B. & C.) Murrill n. n. [Polyporus 
crocitinctus B. & C.] Bull. Torr. Bot. Club, 32:360. July 
1905 . 

Flaviporus rufoflavus (B. & C.) Murrill n. n. [Polyporus rufo- 
flavus B. & C., Polyporus braunii Ranh.] Bull. Torr. Bot. 
Club, 32:360. July 1905. 

Fomitella Murrill n. gen. Polyporaceae, type Fomitella supina 
(Lev.) Murr. (Boletus supinus Sw.) Bull. Torr. Bot. 
Club, 32:365. July 1905. 

Fomitella supina (Sw.) Murrill n. n. [Boletus resupinatus 
Sw. non FI. Dan., B. supinus Sw., Polyporus valenzuelianus 
Mont., P. guadelupensis Lev., P. hemileucus B. & C., P. 
plebeius cubensis B. & C.] Bull. Torr. Bot. Club, 32:365. 
July 1905. 

Fomes abietis Karst., syn. of Porodaedalea pini q. v. 


Sept. 1906 ] Index to North American Mycology 


231 


Fomes alboluteus E. & E., syn. of Aurantiporellus alboluteus 
q. v. 

Fomes regulicolor Cke., syn. of Amauroderma regulicolor q. v. 

Fomiteae, subfamily of Polyporaceae, Key to the genera. [Mur- 
rill] Torr. Bot. Club, 32:364. July 1905. 

Freak Peas, see Cause of [Ascochyta pisi Lib.] 

Fuchsia thymifolia, host to Puccinia fuchsiae Syd. et Holw. 
[Mexico]. Ann. Mycolog. 4:30. Feb. 1906. 

Fulton, Harry R. Chemotropism of Fungi. Bot. Gaz. 41:8i- 
108. Feb. 1906. 

Fun alia cladotricha (B. & C.) Murrill n. n. [Polyporus clado- 
trichus B. & C.] Bull. Torr. Bot. Club, 32:357. July 1905. 

Fun alia stuppea (Berk.) Murrill n. n. [Trametes stuppeus 
Berk., T. peckii Kalchb.] Bull. Torr. Bot. Club, 32:35b. 
July 1905. 

Fun alia villosa (Sw.) Murrill n. n. [Boletus villosus Sw. r 
Favolus villosus Fr., Polyporus villosus Fr.] Bull. Torr. 
Bot. Club, 32:356. July 1905. 

Fungi as related to Weather and Fungi upon the Experiment 
Grounds [in Report of the Botanical Department. . Extracts 
from “Weather and Crop Bulletin” and notes on the oc¬ 
currences of a few parasitic fungi.] Byron D. Halsted,. 
Earle J. Owen and Jacob K. Shaw. Rep. N. J. Agr. Coll. 
Exp. Sta. for 1905:510-517. 1906. 

Fungi, Deleterious Agents upon, Action of insoluble substances, 
see Deleterious. 

Fungi having many fruit-forms, on the Nomenclature of, see 
Nomenclature. 

Fungi, New Species of, Cuba [Earle], see Algunos Hongos. 

Fungi Utahenses [exsiccati]. A. O. Garrett. Fascicle 3. Nos. 
51-75-1 10 July 1906. 

Fungous Diseases [of coffee in Cuba.] Melville Thurston Cook, 
and William Titus Horne. Estacion Cen. Agr. Cuba, Bull. 
3:16-19. PI. V. Sept. 1905. 

Fungus, A parasitic, on a Moss [Epicoccum torquens Massee r 
n. sp.] George Massee. Torreya, 6:48-50. Mar. 1906. 

Fusarium, some factors concerned in the color production in a 
species of Fusarium. J. B. Pollock. Science, N. S. 23 422- 
3. 16 Mar. 1906. 


(To be continued.) 


Journal of Mycology 

A Periodical Devoted to North American Mycology. Issued ‘Bi¬ 
monthly; January , March , May , July , September and November 
Price , $ 2.00 per Year. To Foreign Subscribers $2.2 5. Edited and 

Published by ^ ^ KELLERMAN , Ptf. £>., COLUMBUS , Otf/ 0 . 


EDITOR'S NOTES. 

The proposition that the diagnosis of new species shall be in 
Latin has been discussed by many of the American botanists— 
and the verdict seems to be favorable. How it could be other¬ 
wise is not clear. And yet it is almost ludicrous if not appalling 
to contemplate the quality of ‘Latin’ that henceforth will be in¬ 
flicted upon the botanical world; remembering that a few mem¬ 
bers of the profession admit their ill knowledge of this idiom, 
and we suspect that some besides may presently betray noticeable 
ignorance. 


It is not an unmitigated reflection to say that only a few 
scientific men in this country are latin scholars, or are so familiar 
with this language that they are able to dash off a Latin de¬ 
scription as quickly as they would indite an English diagnosis 
of the species. Many have earned a reputation as botanists— 
in spite of ignorance in other directions of which possibly they 
might be accused. 


Why should the worker not then write what he has to say, 
with the necessary exactness and conciseness, using his mother 
tongue ; let the world have this product, but at the same time 
accompany the diagnosis with the Latin translation which the 
author himself makes or at least supervises. This would seem 
to be feasible so far as original publication of species in period¬ 
icals is concerned. In extensive compilations, monographs, etc., 
the Latin alone would be used. 


We make a slight innovation in the Journal by way of em¬ 
ploying black type for names of new species and for sub-heads 
(authors’ names) in the Notes from Mycological Literature, a 
plan to be followed in the future. 


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Volume 12 , No. 86 November 1906 

Journal of Mycology 


TABLE OF CONTENTS 

IyONG — Notes on New or Rare Species of Ravenelia. 233 

Atkinson — A New Entoloma from Central Ohio. 237 

Kbllerman — Fungi Selecti Guatemalenses. Exsiccati Decade I... 238 

Morgan — North American Species of Eepiota (Continued). 242 

Kellerman — Index to North American Mycology. 249 

Index to Volume 12.273 


IV. A. Kellerman, Ph. D. 

Professor of Botany, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 


Entered, as Second Class Matter, Postoffice at Columbus, Ohio. 


PRESS OF F. J. HEER, COLUMBUS. OHIO. 












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Address: editor journal of mycology 



Journal of Mycology 

VOLUME 12 — NOVEMBER 1906 


TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Long — Notes on New or Rare Species of Ravenelia. 233 

Atkinson — A New Entoloma from Central Ohio. 237 

Kellerman — Fungi Selecti Guatemalenses. Bxsiccati Decade I... 238 

Morgan — North American Species of Lepiota (Continued).242 

Kellerman — Index to North American Mycology.249 

Index to Volume 12.273 


NOTES ON NEW OR RARE SPECIES OF RAVENELIA, 

W. H. LONG. 

In the study of the genus Ravenelia the following characters 
have been found of much importance. Some of them are often 
omitted from descriptions, hence attention is called to them: 
I. The position of the sori, whether sub-epidermal or sub-cut- 
icular. 2. The number and position of the germ pores of the 
uredospores. 3. The position and number of the cysts. These 
are all constant characters for any given species and can surely be 
determined from the usual herbarium material, as drying does 
not destroy them. The first must be determined by sectioning the 
host; the germ pores by boiling in a solution of 50 per cent, 
lactic acid, and the cyst characters by glycerine and lactic acid 
mounts. 

Uredospores of the globose or sub-globose type have germ 
pores many and scattered, while those that are distinctly longer 
than broad have few (4-8) germ pores in one or two definite 
rows. 

The position, shape and number of the cysts are of vital 
importance and should be carefully noted. 

A good means of studying this character is to mount the 
specimen in a mixture of equal parts of 95 per cent, alcohol and 
100 per cent, glycerine. In this the cysts will swell very slowly, 
thus giving time for observation. Often a drop of 50 per cent, 
lactic acid will have to be added to produce the desired result, 
viz., a slow swelling of the cysts, thus revealing their shape and 
position; or even boiling may have to be resorted to in order to 
clear up the heads and swell the cysts ready for high power study. 

Cysts that are oppressed to the under surface of the head will 










234 


Journal of Mycology 


[Vol. 12 


not show in the first mount of glycerine and alcohol, while cysts 
that are pendent can easily be seen; pendent cysts are beneath the 
entire head, while appressed or pulvinate cysts are peripheral; a 
third type of cysts is seen in thoose heads with many spheroid 
cysts beneath the surface, but not pendent. Ravenelia microcystis 
is an example of this class. Many of the appressed type of cysts 
will appear as if pendent when mounted in water or in a lactic 
acid solution, for they then swell up and hang down around the 
stipe like truly pendent cysts. 

Two new species are here described, one from Florida and 
the other from Jamaica. Also emendations and remarks on sev¬ 
eral Mexican and Texan species heretofore described. 

Ravenelia piscidiae Long n. sp. — Sori sub-epidermal, 

II sori mainly hypophyllous, III sori usually epiphyllous. II 
sori small, punctiform, on pallid spots that show markedly on the 
upper surface of the leaves; II sori cinnamon brown, scattered or 
in irregular groups. II spores sub-globose, somewhat angular, 
strongly and closely verrucose, germ pores scattered, about 8, 
fulvous, walls unifom, 17-20x20-23 /x, usual size, 20x20 /x. 
Paraphyses sparingly present, hyphoid to sub-clavate, often curved 
like a golf club, fulvous, 10 x 30-35 /x, bases semi-hyaline and 
collapsed. Ill sori on different leaves, epiphyllous, small, orbic¬ 
ular, black-brown, firm, well scattered over entire surface of leaf. 

III heads chestnut brown, smooth pulvinate, 65-80/x, 4-5 spores in 
cross section, many heads only ten-spored, 6 peripheral and 4 
central ones; paraphyses sparingly present in III sori, cysts 
hyaline, flat, appressed, peripheral, coherent into stipe, swelling 
and bursting in water; pedicel short, deciduous, hyaline. 

On Piscidia erythrina, Miami, Fla., March 25, 1903. Coll. 
E. W. D. Holway. 

This species is close to R. uleana, but differs in its pedicel 
being short and its cysts being flat and in all its gross characters. 

Ravenelia arthuri Long n. sp. — Sori sub-epidermal, 
epiphyllous; II sori not present. II spores intermixed with III 
spores. II spores fulvous, walls thick, uniform, spinulose, oval 
to globose, germ pores scattered, more than 6, 20 x 20-26 jx, par¬ 
aphyses not present. Ill sori linear to elliptical, small, surrounded 
by the very prominent ruptured epidermis, black brown. Ill heads 
pulvinate,chestnut brown, smooth, 75-100x40-45 jx thick, 4-8 
spores across, heads often irregular, cysts very many, pendent, 
beneath entire head, globose, hyaline, with a brown, finger-like 
projection from base into center of cyst, swelling and finally burst¬ 
ing in water; pedicel short, compound, hyaline, deciduous, cysts 
often separating from heads. 

On unknown plant, Jamaica, W. I., Feb., 1891. Coll. Thax- 
ter from Herbarium of Dr. Farlow. 


Nov. 1905 ] Notes on Species of Ravenelia 


235 


This species differs from R. uleana in all its gross characters 
and in its short deciduous pedicel. 

Ravenelia australis. Sori sub-epidermal, epiphyllous; II sori 
not present; II spores intermixed with III spores; II spores 
faintly echinulate to smooth, walls uniform, elliptic to slightly 
fusiform, fulvous, germ pores four, equatorial, large, 
10-16 x 27-32 fx, paraphyses sparingly present, clavate to sub-cap¬ 
itate, fulvous, darker at apex, 30-40 jw, long, heads 10-15 ju, thick, 
base of stipe hyaline. Ill sori scattered, epiphyllous, black brown, 
orbicular, small, naked or rarely surrounded by the ruptured epi¬ 
dermis, from 3 to many heads in a sorus. Ill heads chestnut 
brown to black brown, smooth pulvinate, 6-8 cells across, 70-100 /*, 
cysts appressed coherent, peripheral, hyaline; pedicel compound, 
hyaline, short, deciduous, cysts bursting very easily in water. 

On Leucaena microphylla Igualla Mex., Nov. 2, 1903, No. 
5314 of E. W. D. Holway. 

This species was reported by Dr. J. C. Arthur as R. verru¬ 
cosa in his “Leguminous Rusts from Mexico,” Bot. Gazette 
39:392, June, 1905. There are two points of difference in this 
and in the description of R. australis as originally published, viz., 
the cysts are reported as many and pedicel not compound. If this 
is correct then the Mexican plant here described is not R. australis 
but is a new species. The other characters coincide so fully that 
the writer has placed it as R. australis in spite of the differences 
noted. 

Ravenelia mexicana Transz. was collected by Pringle, Sept. 
12, 1889, in Mexico on Calliandra grandiflora, and has not since 
been reported, notwithstanding the many collections of Mexican 
species by Mr. Holway; that the plant was not rediscovered 
seemed strange, so a careful study of the Mexican species was 
made, with the result that the writer is fully convinced that R. 
mexicana Transcz. and R. mimosae-sensitivae P. Henn. are the 
same species. A careful comparison of the types of the two; spe¬ 
cies, with subsequent collection of one of them, was made, and the 
above opinion confirmed. The II heads of both plants have one 
very marked character, viz., the papillae on the heads are longer 
and more prominent around and near the base of the head than 
those at the top, being often reduced at top to warts. This is an 
unusual character and determined the identity of the two plants. 
No II spores of R mexicana were seen, but the described shape 
and size agrees with those given for R. mimosae-sensitivae; also 
the recently described species, R. mconspicua Arthur, is the same 
plant as R. mimosae-sensitivae, with slightly smaller uredospores 


236 


Journal of Mycology 


[Vol. 12 


(3-4 /x difference). As the writer sees it, R mexicana, R. mimosae- 
sensitivae and R. inconspicua are all one and the same plant. 

There are four other species so closely related that they should 
be considered as one species, viz., R. expansa, Diet. & Holw., R. 
fragrans Long, R. humphreyana P. Henn., and R. pulcherrima 
Arthur, while the last two are undoubtedly identical, even to the 
peculiar colored paraphyses. 

R. expansa and R. fragrans differ mainly in the shape of their 
paraphyses, but the writer has found varying shades of these on 
the different hosts in Holway’s collection; the other characters of 
the two are practically identical; the papillae on some heads of 
R. fragrans are more pronounced than on R. expansa, while on 
others they are of the same size; R. humphreyana differs from 
both in the intense wine-colored heads of its paraphyses, but the 
shape is the same as R. expansa; this color is probably due to the 
host; the III heads of R. humphreyana have slightly less prom¬ 
inent papillae or warts; if the paraphyses are disregarded, then 
the four species are the same. No. 5359 of E. W. D. Holway is 
R. indica and not R. cassiaecola; Nos. 5324, 5328, 5326, 5263 are 
R. expansa all of Holway’s collection, “Leguminous Rusts from 
Mexico,” Bot. Gazette 39:392, June, 1905. 

Denton, Texas. 


a 

A NEW ENTOLOMA FROM CENTRAL OHIO. 

BY GEORGE F. ATKINSON. 

Specimens, notes and photograph of a fungus that proves to 
be new were received from Prof. W. A. Kellerman. The follow¬ 
ing diagnosis is given: 

Entoloma subcostatum Atkinson n. sp. 

2I 54 2 - Photogr. Coll. 

On grassy ground, Campus, Ohio State University, Colum¬ 
bus, Ohio. Coll, R. A. Young, Com. W. A. Kellerman. No. 
4930. Received Nov. 1, 1906. 

Plants gregarious or in troops or clusters, 6-8 cm high; 
pileus 4-8 cm. broad; stems 1-1.5 cm. thick. 

Pileus dark gray to hair brown or olive brown, often sub- 
virgate with darker lines; gills light salmon color, becoming dull; 


















' 




































Journal of Mycology 


Plate fl‘2 



KXTOLOMA SUBCOSTATUM Atkinson 











Nov. 1906 ] A New Entoloma from Central Ohio 


237 


stem same color as pileus but paler, in drying the stems usually 
becoming as dark as the pileus. 

Pileus subviscid when moist, convex to expanded, plane or 
subgibbous, not umbonate, irregular, repand, margin incurved, 
flesh white, rather thin, very thin toward the margin. 

Gills broad, i-i-J cm broad, narrowed toward the margin of 
the pileus, deeply sinuate the angles usually rounded, adnexed, 
easily becoming free, edge usually plane, sometimes connected by 
veins, sometimes costate, especially toward the margin of the 
pileus. 

Basidia 4-spored. 

Spores subglobose, about six angles 8-10 /x in diameter, some 
slightly longer in the direction of the apiculus, pale rose under 
the microscope. 

Stems even, fibrous striate, outer bark subcartilaginous, 
flesh white, stuffed, becoming fistulose. 

Odor somewhat of old meal and nutty, not pleasant; taste 
similar. 

Related to E. prunuloides Fr. and E. clypeatum Linn. Dif¬ 
fers from the former in dark stem and uneven pileus, differs from 
the latter in being subviscid, even stem and pileus not umbonate 
and much more irregular, and differs from both in subcostate 
gills. 


Explanation of Plate 92. — Entoloma subcostatum Atkinson. Mature 
plants; the lower specimen in section shows the broad gills and vrey thin 
flesh. 


238 


Journal of Mycology 


[Vol. 12 


FUNGI SELECTI GUATEMALENSES. EXSICCATI 

DECADE I.* 

W. A. KELLERMAN. 

It is proposed to issue from time to time small sets of Guate¬ 
malan fungi which may be of some interest. There will be a 
number of new species included, and many peculiar tropical forms, 
and others to illustrate new hosts, variations or extended distri¬ 
bution. The sets will not be offered for sale, but it is intended 
that the edition may be ample for the larger herbaria m case t e 
specimens are desired. The first decade includes the following: 

1. Graphiola phoenicis (Moug.) Poit., on Thrinax sp. indet. 

2. Melampsora bigelowii Thiim., on Salix humboldtiana H. 

B. K. 

3. Puccinia cannae (Wint.) P. Henn., on Canna indica L. 

4. Puccinia cognita Syd., on Senecio fraseri Hemsl. 

5. Puccinia cynanchi Lagerh., on Philibertiella crassifolia 

Hemsl. 

6. Puccinia heterospora B. & C., on Sida cordifolia L. 

7. Puccinia rosea (D 1 . & H.) Arthur, on Ageratum conyzoides L. 

8. Ravenelia humphreyana Diet., on Poinciana pulcherrima L. 

9. Ravenelia spinulosa Diet, et Holw., on Cassia biflora L. 

10. Ustilago panici-leucophaei Bref., on Panicum leucophaeum 

H. B. K. 


1. Graphiola phoenicis (Moug.) Poit. 

On Thrinax sp. indet. 

Gualan (alt. 122 m., 400 ft.) Dept. Zacapa, Guatemala, Central 
America. J an * I 9 ° 5 * 

W. A. Kellerman, No. 4633. 


This fungus of doubtful affinity is common in green houses the 
world over occurring on different species of Palms. In Guatemala the 
parasite was found in only one locality but it was very abundant, prac¬ 
tically all the plants in the low, wet ground where the host occurred 

being affected. 


* Contributions to Guatemalan Mycology. III. 




Nov. 1906 ] Fungi Selecti Guatemalenses 


239 


2. Melampsora bigelowii Thuem. 

On Salix humboldtiana H.B.K. 


Near Patalul, Dept. Solola, Guatemala, C. A. Feb. n, 1906. 

W. A. Kellerman, No. 5418. 


The host determined by R. 
Arthur. The salix occurs very 
in very many of the localities the 


F. Griggs and the fungus by J. C. 
commonly throughout Guatemala, and 
Rust was observed. 


3. Puccinia cannae (Winter) P. Henn. 

Uredospores. 

On Canna indica L. 


Mazatenango, Guatemala, C. A. 

W. A. Kellerman, No. 5357 - 


Feb. 28, 1905. 


The teleutospores were reported by P Hennings on materia 
lected in Brazil, and hence the name as above; but only Uredospores 
were seen on the Guatemalan host, corresponding to the Uredo cannae 
Winter. Unfortunately the specimens are badly parasitized, as is com¬ 
monly the case with tropical Uredineae. 


4. Puccinia cognita Syd. 

On Verbesina fraseri Hemsl. 


Guatemala City (alt. 1465 m. 4810 ft.), Guatemala. Feb. 1 , IQ 05 . 

W. A. Kellerman, No. 4324. 


The host was determined by B. L. Robinson. Our determination 
of the fungus was verified by J. C. Arthur This is a common Rust on 
a host plant quite widely distributed and abundant. 


5. Puccinia cynanchi Lagerh. 

On Philibertiella crassifolia Hemsl. 

(Host det. John Donnell Smith.) 

Laguna (Lake Amatitlan), alt. 1200 m. (3950 ft.) Depart. Amati- 
tlin, Guatemala, C. A. Feb. n, 1905- 

W. A. Kellerman, No. 4348. 

There is close morphological resemblance between Puccinia g°n°lobi 
Rav. and Puccinia cynanchi Lagerh., and they occur on many hosts. Not 


240 


Journal of Mycology 


[Vol. 12 


willing to call my material by either of these names, and temporarily 
designating this rust as Puccinia philibertiellicola I referred the matter 
to Dr. J. C. Arthur who gave the name as used on this label, stating in 
a letter dated August 14, 1906, as follows: “I have it on the same host 
collected by Pringle in Oaxaca, Mex. There is considerable difference 
in the habit and appearance of the different collections and on different 
hosts, but I find no constant morphological characters with which to 
separate them. I have provisionally, however, assorted my material under 
two names P. Gonolobi, where the fungus is in small groups, and P. 
Cynanchi, where it spreads evenly over the surface, often extending along 
the young shoots as they grow, and sometimes forming witches’ brooms. 
I have the former on five, and the latter on nine different hosts.” (J. C. 
Arthur.) 


6. Puccinia heterospora B. <5c C. 

On Sida cordifolia L. 

Gualan (alt. 122 m. 400 ft.) Dept. Zacapa, Guatemala, Central 
America. March 12, 1905. 

W. A. Kellerman, No. 4323. 

The host was identified by John Donnell Smith, and the determina¬ 
tion of the fungus verified by J. C. Arthur. This is a widely distributed 
species in warm, temperate and tropical countries, occurring in Africa, 
India, China, Australia, the Philippines as well as in the American con¬ 
tinent. Reported hosts are numerous. The variations are considerable; 
“Man ist leicht geneigt, wenn man die extremen Habitusformen vor 
sich hat, dieselbe darauf hin in mehrere Arten zu zerlegen; dass Pucc. 
heterospora veilleicht auf Grund von Kulturversuchen noch in mehrere 
Species zu trennen ware, mochten wir eher verneinen als bejahen” 
(Sydow. Monogr. Ured.) 


7. Puccinia rosea (D. & H.) Arthur. 

On Ageratum conyzoides L. 

San Felipe (alt. 615 m., 2050 ft.), Dept. Retalhuleu, Guatemala, 
C. A. Feb. 4, 1906. 

W. A. Kellerman, No. 5446. 

The host species was observed at several places in Guatemala, on 
the Pacific slope. The plants were abundantly affected with this Rust, 
which has been identified by Arthur and Kern as given above. The 
vitality of the host is more or less impaired by the parasite. The Rust 
has been collected heretofore by E. W. D. Holway in southern Mexico, 
on several species of Eupatorium and on Ageratum corymbosum and 
Ageratum strictum. 


Nov. 1906] 


Fungi Selecti Guatemalenses 


241 


8. Ravenelia humphreyana P. Henn. 

On Poinciana pulcherrima L. 

Gualan (alt. 122 m. 400 ft.) Dept. Zacapa, Guatemala, Central 
America. Dec. 27, 1905. 

W. A. Kellerman, No. 5727. 

The host was determined by R. F. Griggs and the fungus by J. C. 
Arthur. The host is a common plant in many parts of Guatemala and 
it was found usually to be abundantly affected, though no effect on the 
vitality or vigor of the host could be detected. 


9. Ravenelia spinulosa Diet, et Holw. 

On Cassia biflora L. 

Gualan (alt. 122 m., 400 ft.), Depart. Zacapa, Guatemala, Central 
America. Dec. 30, 1905. 

W. A. Kellerman, No. 5441. 

The host was determined by J. M. Greenman and the fungus by J. 
C. Arthur. This Cassia is common and very abundant at Gualan and 
many other places in Guatemala; scarcely a plant was found uninfected 
by the Ravenelia which however did not appreciably distort the host or 
check its growth. 


10. Ustilago panici=leucophaei Bref. 

On Panicum leucophaeum H.B.K. 

Zacapa (alt. 137 m., 457 ft.) Depart. Zacapa, Guatemala, Central 
America. Jan. 25, 1905. 

W. A. Kellerman, No. 4301. 

The identification was made by Dr. G. P. Clinton. The smut was 
very abundant at this locality, infecting most of the plants found on the 
alluvial bottom where the material was obtained. The smut was seen 
also in abundance on the Pacific side of the country near Lake Amatitlan, 
alt. 1200 m. (3950 ft.). It has been reported from Mexico and from 
Cuba and Jamaica. Ustilago insularis P. Henn. regarded by Dr. G. P. 
Clinton as the same species, is from Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. 


242 


Journal of Mycology 


[Vol. 12 


NORTH AMERICAN SPECIES OF LEPIOTA 

BY A. P. MORGAN. 

( Continued from page 203.) 

§ 2. ANNULI MOBILES. THE VEIL IN THIS SEC¬ 
TION IS MARGINAL AND INFERIOR AS IN THE FIRST 
SECTION, BUT THE DERMIS OF THE PILEUS AND 
THAT OF THE STIPE ARE DISSIMILAR, THE COL¬ 
ORED CUTICLE OF THE PI LEU S NOT BEING CONTIN¬ 
UED DOWNWARD UPON THE STIPE, RARELY COLOR¬ 
ING EVEN THE UPPER MARGIN OF THE VEIL. THE 
VEIL IS ANNULATE UPON THE STIPE AND IS COM¬ 
MONLY A THIN MEMBRANACEOUS BAND, THOUGH 
SOMETIMES IT IS THICKENED AND SUBCORIACE- 
OUS; IT IS CONTINUOUS DOWNWARD WITH THE 
DERMIS OF THE STIPE, AND BY ITS UPPER BORDER 
CONNECTS WITH THE DERMIS OF THE PILEDS. 
SOMETIMES THE VEIL IS FIRST TORN AWAY FROM 
THE STIPE AND DRAWN UPWARD TO SOME EXTENT 
UNTIL THE EXPANSION OF THE PILEUS BEGINS, 
THUS GIVING RISE TO THE TYPICAL (< ANNULUS 
MOBILISE 

VII. SUBCLYPEOLARIAE. Dermis of the pileus a 
thin membrane, radiately hbrillose; the cuticle at first continuous, 
at length separating into small or minute scales, which are drawn 
apart and scattered over the white hbrillose surface. The cuticle 
of the stipe commonly white, smooth and even or only appressed- 
ly hbrillose; the annulus thin and membranaceous, usually per¬ 
sistent. 

This is a large tribe of mostly small Agarics; they differ 
from the Clypeolariae in having a smooth, white stipe, free from 
the colored scales of the pileus. 

a. Scales of the pileus white, cinereous, yellowish. 

42. LEPIOTA MIAMENSIS Morgan, Myc. Flora M. 
V. 1883. 

Pileus fleshy, ovoid then convex and explanate, subumbon- 
ate; the flesh thin, white; the dermis radiately fibrillose, all white 
or a little dusky in the center, the cuticle soon separating into 
small concentric scales; the veil thin and delicate, subappendicu- 
late. Stipe slender, tapering slightly upward, fistulous, glabrous, 
all white; the annulus lacerate, subpersistent. Lamellae rather 
broad, white, free approximate; the spores oblong-ovoid, obliquely 
apiculate, 5-7 x 3 mic. 


Nov. 1906]A T orth American Species of Lepiota 


243 


Growing in the woods among the old leaves. New York, 
Peck; Preston, O. Pileus 2-4 cm. in diameter, the stipe 4-5 cm. 
long and 3-5 mm. thick. A rare plant. 

43. LEPIOTA ARENICOLA Peck, 41 N. Y. Report, 
1887. Syll. IX, 6. 

Pileus at first broadly conical, then convex or nearly plane; 
the surface obscurely punctate with minute granular scales, 
whitish or cinereous; the margin substriate and crenulate; the veil 
thin and fragile, evanescent. Stripe arising from a mycelial bulb, 
slender, equal, stuffed, glabrous, whitish. Lamellae broad, dis¬ 
tant, free, white; spores oblong or subfusiform, acute at one end, 
12-15 x 5-6 mic. 

Growing in sandy ground, New York, Peck. Pileus 6-12 
mm. in diameter, the stipe 16-24 mm. in length, and about 1 mm. 
in thickness. The species is apparently rare. 

44. LEPIOTA MUTATA Peck, Bull. Torr. Club, 1895, 
Sylloge XIV. 66. 

Pileus fleshy, convex, subumbonate; the flesh thin and white; 
the dermis slightly scabrous in the center, white, brown in the 
dried plant. Stipe slender, equal, hollow, white; the annulus 
small, sometimes evanescent. Lamellae close, thin; subventri- 
cose, free, white; spores elliptic, 8-11 x 5-6 mic. 

Growing on the ground in woods, Kansas, Bartholomew. 
Pileus 2-4 cm. in diameter, the stipe 2-3 cm. long and 2-5 mm. 
in thickness. 

45. LEPIOTA ALLUVIINA Peck, 35 N. Y. Rep. 1882. 

Pileus fleshy, convex or plane, sometimes reflexed on the 
margin; the flesh thin, white; the dermis radiately fibrillose, sep¬ 
arating into minute, pale yellow scales. Stipe slender, tapering 
upward from a slightly thickened base, whitish or pallid, the 
cuticle fibrillose; annulus thin, membranaceous, subpersistent, 
often near the middle of the stipe. Lamellae close, free, white or 
yellowish; spores elliptic, 6-8 x 4-5 mic. 

Growing in alluvial soil among weeds. New York, Peck; 
Michigan, Longyear. Pileus 12-25 mm * m diameter, the stipe 
3-5 cm. long and 2-3 mm. thick. In drying the whole plant as¬ 
sumes a rich yellow hue. 

b. Scales of the pileus red, rufous, fulvous. 

46. LEPIOTA CONSPURCATA, Agaricus conspur- 

CATUS WlLLDENOW, PRODR. Fl. BeRL. 1787. AGARICUS CRIS- 
tatus Bolton, Hist. Fung. 1788. 

Odor strong, taste very disagreeable. Pileus fleshy, ovoid 
then campanulate and explanate, umbonate; the flesh very thin, 



244 


Journal of Mycology 


[Vol. 12 


white; the dermis radiately fibrillose, whitish beneath the cuticle; 
cuticle at first continuous, alutaceous to rufous, soon separating 
into numerous small scales which are drawn apart and concen¬ 
trically arranged around the umbo. Stipe slender, tapering 
slightly upward, fistulous, rufescent beneath the white silky-fibril- 
lose cuticle; annulus membranaceous lacerate, deciduous. Lam¬ 
ellae moderately broad, close, white, free and rather remote; 
spores ellipsoid, 7-8 x 4-5 mic. 

Growing in grassy ground in fields, gardens, etc. Pileus 
2-4 cm. in diameter, the stipe 3-5 cm. long and 2-4 mm. thick. 
This species has been reported from various parts of the country, 
but evidently several of the species of the tribe have been er¬ 
roneously referred to it; my specimens so referred in the Myc. 
Flora M. V. are inodorous and belong to the following species. 

47 . LEPIOTA ANGUSTANA Britzelmayer, Derm, et 
Mel. App. 1884 . 

Inodorous. Pileus fleshy, subovoid then convex and expla- 
nate; the flesh thin, white, subrufescent; the dermis radiately 
fibrillose, white beneath the rufous cuticle, which is soon drawn 
apart into small concentric scales. Stipe slender, tapering slightly 
upward, fistulous, rufescent beneath the white-fibrillose cuticle; 
the annulus membranaceous, lacerate, subpersistent. Lamellae 
rather broad, close, obtuse behind, free, white; spores pointed at 
one end and obtuse of truncate at the other, 5-7 x 3 mic. 

Growing on the ground among old leaves in woods. Prob¬ 
ably common throughout the country east and south, and known 
as Lepiota cristata A. & S. Pileus 1.5-3 cm. i n diameter, the 
stipe 3-5 cm. long and 2-3 mm. thick. It has no disagreeable 
odor and is readily distinguished from L. conspurcata by its 
peculiar spores. 

48. LEPIOTA FULVASTER B. & C., Ann. & Mag. 

N. H. 1853. 

Pileus fleshy, convex then explanate, subumbonate; the flesh 
thin, white; the dermis radiately fibrillose, rimulose-sulcate around 
the margin, white beneath the cuticle; the cuticle fulvous, soon 
separating into small scales, which are drawn apart and spot the 
white surface. Stipe slender, tapering upward from a slightly 
thickened base, fistulous, fibrous-stuffed, white and smooth; the 
annulus membranaceous, fulvous, subpersistent. Lamellae ven- 
tricose, not crowded, attached to a distinct collar, which is not, 
however, separate from the stipe, rather thick, of a pure white; 
spores -. 

Growing amongst grass in sandy soil. S. Carolina, Curtis. 
Pileus 6-12 mm. in diameter, the stipe 2-3 cm. long and scarcely 




Nov. 1906 ] North American Species of Lepiota 24 & 

i mm. thick. “A small but extremely elegant species;” it is de¬ 
sirable that the spores be known. 

49. LEPIOTA RUBROTINCTA Peck, 35 N. Y. Rep. 
1882. Mastocephalus carneo-annulatus Clements, Bot. 
Neb. IV. 1896. Lepiota Erythrella Spegazzini, Fungi, Apg. 
1899. Sylloge XVI. 10. 

Pileus fleshy, ovoid then campanulate and explanate, sub- 
umbonate; the flesh thin, white; the dermis radiately fibrillose; 
the cuticle at first continuous, orange-red to red and rufous or 
darker in the center, at length rimulose-sulcate and becoming 
scaly nearly to the umbo. Stipe tapering upward from a clavate 
base, fistulous, pure white, the cuticle silky-fibrillose or quite 
smooth; annulus a thin persistent membranaceous band, the 
border often colored as the pileus. Lamellae rather narrow, 
close, ventricose, white, free and sub-remote; spores elliptic- 
oblong, obliquely apiculate, 7-10x4-6 mic., uni-guttulate. 

Growing on the ground among old leaves in woods, New 
England westward to Kansas and Nebraska. Pileus 3-7 cm. in 
diameter; the stipe 4-10 cm. long, 3-5 mm. thick at the apex and 
5-10 mm. thick at the base. Spegazzini gives a most elaborate 
account of this species in all its forms; the form e. virescens 
however, seems to me distinct enough to constitute a species. 

50. LEPIOTA INCARNATA, Mastocephalus incar- 
natus Clements, Bot. Neb. IV. 1896. 

Pileus fleshy, conical, at length campanulate, rarely convex; 
the flesh very thin, white; the dermis radiately fibrillose, striate 
around the margin, pale incarnate beneath the darker cuticle, 
which at length separates into numerous small scales, the umbo 
becoming black. Stipe slender, equal, fibrous-stuffed, glabrous, 
rarely silky, pallid or pinkish; the annulus thin, membranaceous, 
persistent. Lamellae subdistant, white, free and remote; spores 
elliptic-ovoid, apiculate, 5-6 x 3 mic. uniguttulate. 

Growing on the ground among old leaves in woods. Ne¬ 
braska, Clements. Pileus 2-4 cm. in diameter, the stipe 3-6 cm. 
long and 2-5 mm. thick. 

51. LEPIOTA VIRESCENS, Lepiota erythrella e. 
virescens Spegazzini, Fungi Arg. 1899. Lepiota caeru- 
lescens Peck, Bull. Torr. Club, 1899. 

Pileus fleshy, ovoid then campanulate and explanate, sub- 
umbonate; the flesh very thin, at first white, the whole plant ex¬ 
hibiting tints of red, green and blue when handled; the dermis 
radiately fibrillose, becoming rimulose-sulcate nearly to the cen¬ 
ter; the cuticle at first testaceous to umber, soon separating into 
minute reflexed scales. Stipe tapering upward from a clavate 


246 


Journal oj Mycology 


[Vol. 12 


base, fistulous silky-fibrillose or nearly glabrous, at first white; 
the annulus membranaceous, subpersistent. Lamellae broad 
rather distant, at first white, free, sub-remote; spores elliptic- 
oblong, obliquely apiculate, 7-9 x 4-5 mic. uniguttulate. 

Growing among old leaves in woods. W. Virginia, Lloyd; 
Preston, O. Pileus 1-3 cm. in diameter, the stipe 3-5 cm. long 
and 2-3 mm. in thickness. The peculiarity of the plant is that 
when handled it exhibits changing tints of red, green and blue; 
finally when dried it takes on a permanent bluish color. 

52. LEPIOTA RUFESCENS Morgan sp. nov., Agaricus 

FUSCOSQUAMEUS MORGAN, MYC. FLORA M. V. 

Pileus fleshy, ovoid then convex and expanded, subumbo- 
nate; the flesh thin, white, reddening when cut; the dermis radi- 
ately fibrillose, whitish beneath the cuticle; cuticle continuous till 
near maturity, whitish, pinkish and rufescent, at length separat¬ 
ing into minute scales. Stipe tapering upward, fistulous, fibrous- 
stuffed, rufescent beneath the white-fibrillose cuticle; the annulus 
thin, membranaceous. Lamellae rather broad, close, white, rufes¬ 
cent, free, approximate.; spores elliptic-ovoid, obliquely apiculate, 
6-8 x 4-5 mic. 

Growing among old leaves and rotten wood in woods. Pres¬ 
ton, O. Pileus 3-5 cm. in diameter; the stipe 5-7 cm. in length, 
4-6 mm. thick at the apex and 7-10 mm. at the base. The whole 
plant when handled changes gradually to a reddish-brown color, 
when completely dried it is black. This may be the plant Lloyd 
doubtfully referred to Lepiota meleagris. 

c. Scales of the pileus brown or blackish. 

53. LEPIOTA SUBCLYPEOLARIA B. & C., Fungi Cub. 
1867 Cooke, Australian Fungi, and Grevillea, XIX. Pl. 180. 

Pileus fleshy, at first ovoid then convex and explanate, um- 
bonate; the flesh thin, white, the dermis radiately fibrillose, white 
beneath the cuticle, striate around the margin; the cuticle at first 
continuous, rufous or fuscous, soon broken pu and drawn apart 
as small scattered scales, except upon the umbo. Stipe tapering 
upward, fistulous, white and smooth; the annulus thin, membra¬ 
naceous, persistent. Lamellae rather narrow, distant, white, free 
and remote from the stipe; spores elliptic, 7-8 mic. long. 

Growing about the roots of trees or rotten wood. Cuba, 
Wright. Pileus 3-5 cm. in diameter, the stipe 5-8 cm. in length 
and 3-6 mm. in thickness. The description is based mostly on 
Cooke’s figures. 


Nov. 1906 ] North American Species of Lepiota 


247 


54. LEPIOTA SORDESCENS B. & C. Fungi Cub. 1867. 

The flesh of the pileus thin, white; the dermis radiately fibril- 
lose, white beneath the cuticle, the margin striate; the cuticle 
brown, separating into scales, which are deciduous except in the 
center. Stipe slender, glabrous, white, brownish when dry. 
Lamellae narrow, at first white, remote. 

Growing on logs in woods. Cuba, Wright. Pileus 2-3 cm. 
in diameter, the stipe 3-5 cm. long and 2 mm. thick. This is all 
that can be inferred from the meager description. 

55. LEPIOTA FELINOIDES Peck, Bull. Torr. Club, 
1900, Sylloge XVI, 9. 

Pileus fleshy, ovoid then campanulate and explanate, sub- 
umbonate; the flesh thin, white; the dermis radiately fibrillose, 
at length rimulose; the cuticle at first continuous, pale to dark 
umber, separating into small scales, which are gradually drawn 
apart nearly to the umbo. Stipe tapering upward from a clavate 
base, fistulous, pure white, the cuticle silky-fibrillose, annulus a 
thin membranaceous band, quite persistent. Lamellae rather 
broad, close, white, ventricose, free and subremote; spores elliptic- 
ovoid, 6-8 x 4-5 mic. 

Growing on the ground among old leaves in woods. Mis¬ 
souri, Glatfetter; Preston, O. Pileus 3-6 cm. in diameter; the 
stipe 5-8 cm. long, 3-5 mm. thick at the apex and 5-10 mm. thick 
at the base. The species differs from Lepiota rubrotincta in no 
other way than in the color of the pileus; both grow together 
indiscriminately. 

I 

56. LEPIOTA BRUNNESCENS Peck, Bull. Torr. 
Club, 1904; Sylloge XVII. 6. 

Pileus fleshy, convex or nearly plane, obtuse or umbonate; 
the flesh thin, white; the dermis radiately fibrillose, whitish be¬ 
neath the cuticle, sometimes rimulose around the margin; the 
cuticle at first continuous and brownish, soon breaking up into 
scales and granules, except in the center. Stipe equal or slightly 
thickened toward the base, hollow, fibrous, white; the annulus 
small, persistent about the middle. Lamellae close, ventricose, 
free, white, spores elliptic, 6-8 x 4-5 mic. 

Growing in open woods and grassy places. Missouri, 
Glatfelter. Pileus 2-3 cm. in diameter, the stipe 3-5 cm. long 
and 2-4 mm. thick. 


248 Journal of Mycology [Vol. 12 

57. LEPIOTAi GLATFELTERI Peck, Bull. Torr. Club, 
1904; Sylloge XVII. 7. 

Pileus fleshy, convex or nearly plane, obtuse or slightly um- 
bonate; the flesh thin, white; the dermis minutely innate-fibrillose, 
gray, gray-brown, sometimes purple tinged, the center often 
darker, the margin sometimes radiately rimose. Stipe subequal, 
firm, stuffed or hollow, whitish; the annulus thin, persistent. 
Lamellae close, lanceolate, free, white or whitish; spores elliptic, 
6-8 x 4-5 mic. 

Growing on the ground in woods. Missouri, Glatfelter. 
Pileus 2.5-5 cm - m diameter, the stipe 4-5 cm. long and 2-4 mm. 
thick. 


58. LEPIOTA PHAEOSTICTA Morgan sp. nov. 

Pileus fleshy, sub-ovoid with a blunt apex, expanded and ex- 

planate; the flesh very thin, white; the dermis radiately fibrillose, 
the cuticle soon separating into very minute dark scales, which 
are visible as minute black points on the white surface. Stipe 
tapering upward from a clavate base, white, solid, glabrous; the 
annulus membranaceous, persistent. Lamellae close, white, taper¬ 
ing inward, free and rather remote; spores elliptic-oblong, 
obliquely apiculate, 5-6 x 3.0-3.5 mic. 

Subcaespitose; growing out of rotten logs in woods. Pres¬ 
ton, O. Pileus 10-15 mm - in diameter, the stipe 15-20 mm. long 
and 1-2 mm. thick. 

59. LEPIOTA NEOPHANA Morgan sp. nov. 

Pileus fleshy, ovoid then campanulate and expanded, sub- 
umbonate, the flesh thin, firm, white; the dermis thin, tough, the 
surface smooth and glabrous, buff to pale umber, dark brown in 
the center, the cuticle contiuous or at maturity sometimes crack¬ 
ing into irregular areolae. Stipe slender, subequal, tough, fistu¬ 
lous, white above the annulus, pale umber below, with a white- 
fibrillose cuticle. Lamellae broad, close, white, obtuse behind, 
free, approximate; spore oblong, obliquely apiculate, 4-5 x 3 mic. 

Growing on the ground in woods. Preston, O. Pileus 2-3 
cm. in diameter; the stipe 3-4 cm. long and 2-3 mm. thick. The 
peculiarity of the plant is its toughness in all parts, its subco- 
reaceous texture. It belongs more properly in Tribe I. 

(To be continued.) 


Nov. 1906] Index to North America?i Mycology 


249 


INDEX TO NORTH AMERICAN MYCOLOGY. 

Alphabetical List of Articles , Authors , Subjects , New Species and 

Hosts , New Names and Synonyms. 

W. A. KELLERMAN. 

(Continued from page 231.) 

Galera cubensis Earle n. sp. [Cuba.] Informe An. Estac. 
Agronom. Cuba, 11237. 1 June 1906. 

Galera grisea Earle n. sp. [Cuba.] Informe An. Estac. Ag¬ 
ronom. Cuba, 11237. 1 June 1906. 

Galera simulans Earle n. sp. [Cuba.] Informe An. Estac. 
Agronom. Cuba, 11236. 1 June 1906. 

Ganoderma chaperi Pat., syn. of Amauroderma chaperi q. v. 

Garrett, A. O. Fungi Utahenses [exsiccati.] Fascicle 3 [Nos. 

S!- 7 S-] 10 July 1906. 

Geopetalum album Earle n. sp. Cuba. Informe An. Estac. Cen. 
Agronom. Cuba, 11234. 1 June 1906. 

Geopetalum brunescens Earle n. sp. [Cuba.] Informe An. 
Estac. Cen. Agronom. Cuba, 1 1235. 1 June 1906. 

Geopetalum eugeniae Earle n. sp. [Cuba.] Informe An. Estac. 
Cen. Agronom. Cuba, 11234. 1 June 1906. 

Geopetalum Pat. Pleurotus [Dimidiati] Sacc. Syll. [Earle]. In¬ 
forme An. Estac. Cen. Agronom. Cuba, 1 1234. 1 June 1906. 

Ginseng, Three Fungous Diseases of, see Diseases Three. 

Glatfelter, N. M. Preliminary List of Higher Fungi collected 
in the vicinity of St. Louis, Mo., from 1898 to 1905. Trans. 
Acad. Sci. St. Louis, 16133-94. 14 June 1906. 

Gloeosporium apiosporium Sacc. n. sp., in foliis languidis Arc- 
tostaphyli tomentosae vulgo Madrona de arbol. [Mexico.] 
Jour. Mycol. 12:51. Mar. 1906. 

Gloeosporium brunneum Ell. & Ev., syn. of Marssonina brunnea 
q. v. 

Gloeosporium delastrei DeLacr., syn. of Marssonina delastrei 
q. v. 

Gioeosporium graminicolum Ell. & Ev., syn. of Marssonina 
graminicola q. v. 

Gloeosporium juglandis (Lib.) Mont., syn. of Marssonina po- 
tentillae q. v. 


^50 Journal of Mycology [Vol. 12 

Gloeosporium juglandis (Lib.) Mont., syn. of Marssonina jug- 
land is q. v. 

Gloeosporium necans Ell. & Ev., syn. of Marssonina necans q. v. 

Gloeosporium potentillae (Desm.) Oud., syn of Massonina po- 
tentillae q. v. 

Gloeosporium psidii G. Del. syn. of Glomerella psidii q. v. 

Gloeosporium quercus Peck, syn. of Marssonina quercus q. v. 

Gloeosporium stenosporum Ell. & Kellerm.. syn. of Marssonina 
stenosporum q. v. 

Gloeosporum toxicodendri Ell. & Martin, syn. of Marssonina 
toxicodendri q. v. 

Glomerella, Paraphyses in the Genus. John L. Sheldon. Sci¬ 
ence, N. S. 23:851-2. 1 June 1906. 

Glomerella psidii (G. Del.) Sheldon n. n. [Gloeosporium psidii 
G. Del.] W. Va. Agr. Exp. Sta. Bull. 104:311. 1 Apr. 1906. 

Glyceria fluitans, host to Uromyces amphidymus Syd. n. sp. 
Ann. Mycolog. 4:29. Feb. 1906. 

Gnaphalium (Anaphalis) margaritaceum, host to Uromyces 
amoenus Syd. n. sp., Ann. Mycolog. 4:29. Feb. 1906. 

Gorgoniceps iowensis Rehm n. sp., ad lignum vetustum. Ann. 
Mycolog. 4:338. Aug. 1906. 

Growth of Panaeolus retirugis, see Rate of 

Guavas, Mummy Disease of, see Ripe-Rot or Mummy . . . . 

Gumming of the Sugar-Cane [Pseudomonas vascularum]. N. 
A. Cobb. Rep. Exp. Sta. of the Hawaiian Sugar Planters’ 
Assoc. Division of Pathology and Physiology, Bull. 3:1-46. 
Honolulu 1905. 

Gymnochilus Clements, Agaricus (Psathyra) Fr. Syst. Myc., 
Hypholoma (Appendiculata) Sacc. Syl. Informe An. Estac. 
Agronom. Cuba, 1:238. 1 June 1906. 

Gymnochilus campestris Earle n. sp. [Cuba.] Informe An. 
Estac. Agronom. Cuba, 1:238. 1 June 1906. 

Gymnochilus caespitosus Earle 11. sp. [Cuba.] Informe An. 
Estac. Agronom. Cuba, 1:24c. 1 June 1906. 

Gymnochilus flocculosis Earle n. sp. [Cuba.] Informe An. 
Estac. Agronom. Cuba, 1 ^38. 1 June 1906. 

Gymnochilus musae Earle n. sp. [Cuba.] Informe An. Estac. 
Agronom. Cuba, 1 *.239. 1 June 1906. 

Gymnochilus roystonia Earle n. sp. [Cuba.] Informe An. 
Estac. Agronom. Cuba, 1:239. 1 June 1906. 


Nov. 1906] Index to North American Mycology 


251 


Gymnolomia multiflora, host to Puccinia aemulans Syd. n. sp. 
Ann. Mycolog. 4:31. Feb. 1906. 

HAiRY-Root Disease, see Crozm-Gall and 

Halsted, Bryon D., Owen, Earle J., and Shaw, Jacob K. Fungi 
as related to Weather and Fungi up Experiment Grounds 
[in Report of Botanical Department. Extracts from 
“Weather and Crop Bulletin” and notes on the occurrences 
of a few parasitic fungi.] Rep. N. J. Agr. Coll. Exp. Sta. 
^1905:510-517. 1906. 

Hamaker, J. I. A Culture for the Zygospores of Mucor stolo- 
nifer. Science, N. S. 23 1710. 4 May 1906. 

Haplosporella conmixta Peck, n. sp., bark of dead branches of 
slippery elm, Ulmus fulva, Bull. Torr. Bot. Club, 331219. 
Apr. 1906. 

Haplosporella missouriensis Bubak n. sp., auf toten Aestchen 
von Persica vulgaris. Jour. Mycol. 12:54. Mar. 1906. 

Harknessia aggregata Syd. n. sp., in foliis languidis Ceanothi 
velutini. Ann. Mycolog. 4 : 344 . Aug. 1906. 

Harper, R. A. Sexual Reproduction and the Organization of the 
Nucleus in Certain Mildews. Carnegie Institution of Wash¬ 
ington Publication No. 37:1-104. PI. I-VII. September 

1905. 

Hasselbring, Heinrich. The Appressoria of the Anthracnoses. 
Bot. Gaz. 43:135-142. August 1906. 

Hedgcock, George Grant. A Disease of Cauliflower and Cab¬ 
bage caused by Sclerotinia. An. Rep. Mo. Bot. Gar. 16:149- 

151. pi. 32-4. 1905. 

Hedgcock, George Grant. A Disease of Cultivated Agaves due 
to Colletotrichum. An. Rep. Mo. Bot. Gar. 16:153-6. PI. 
35-7- I905- 

Hedgcock, Geo. G. The Crown-Gall and Hairy-Root Diseases of 
the Apple Tree. U. S. Dept. Agr. Bureau PI. Industry, 
Bull. 90:1-7. PI. I-III. 17 Nov. 1905. 

Helicoon fairmani Sacc. n. sp., ad ligna putrescentia dejecta, 
socio Bactridio minuto. Ann. Mycolog. 4:278. 5 June 1906. 

Heliomyces nigripes Morgan [Agaricus nigripes Schw., Maras- 
imus nigripes Fr.] A. P. Morgan. Jour. Mycol. 12:93. May 

1906. 

Heliomyces, North American species of. [Monograph.] A. P. 
Morgan. Jour. Mycol. 12:89"92. May 1906. 

Heliomyces vialis Morgan [Marasmius vialis Peck.] A. P. 
Morgan. Jour. Mycol. 12:94. May 1906. 


252 


Journal of Mycology 


[Vol. 12 


Helminthosporium orthospermum Sacc. et Fairm. n. sp., in 
ligno putrescente (quercino?). Jour. Mycol. 12:50. Mar. 
1906. 

Hendersonia mexicana Sacc. n. sp., in foliis languidis Perseae 
gratissimae vulgo Aguacate. [Mexico.] Jour. Mycol. 12:51. 
Mar. 1906. 

Hibiscus syriacus, host to Camarosporum lyndonvillae Sacc. n. 
sp. Ann. Mycolog. 4:277. 5 June 1906. 

Hibiscus syriacus, host to Sphaeropsis lyndonvillae Sacc. n. sp. 
Ann. Mycolog. 4:276. 5 June 1906. 

Higher Fungi [ 67 . Louis; Glatfelter], see Preliminary List of 

• • 

Holwaya pusilla Rehm. n. sp., ad lignum putridum in sylvis. 
Ann. Mycolog. 4:337. Aug. 1906. 

Hongos, see Fungi, new Species of Cuba. . . . 

Horne, William, Titus and Cook, Melville Thurston, see Cook,, 
Melville Thurston and .... 

Hydnum blackfordae Peck., n. sp., Mos_sy ground in low springy 
places in damp mixed woods. Bull. Tor. Bot. Club, 33 :2i8. 
April 1906. 

Hygrophorous davisii Peck, n. sp., in damp places under ferns 
in deciduous woods. Bull. Torr. Bot. Club, 33:214. April 
1906. 

Hygrophorus mephiticus Peck. n. sp., among sphagnum in 
swamps. Bull. Torr. Bot. Club, 33:213. Apr. 1906. 

Hypoderma ptarmicola Fairman n. sp., on dead stems of Achillea 
ptarmica. Proc. Rochester Acad. Sci. 4:216. March 1906. 

HypoxylO’N pumilio Sacc. et Fairm. n. sp. in ligno putri in silvis. 
Jour. Mycol. 12:47. Mar. 1906. 

Index of the Mycological Writing of C. G. Lloyd. Vol. I, 
1898-1905, Cincinnati, Ohio, U. S. A., 20 pp. (May 1905.) 

Index to North American Mycology (continued). W. A. Kel- 
lerman. Jour. Mycol. 12:67-85. Mar. 1906. 

Index to North American Mycology [continued]. W .A. Kel- 
lerman. Jour. Mycol. 12:102-128. May 1906. 

Infection Experiments with Erysiphe graminis DC. George M. 
Reed. Trans. Wise. Acad. Sci. Arts and Let. 15:135-162. 
1904. Issued 1905. 

Informe del Departamento de Patologia Vegetal [general ac¬ 
count in Spanish of a few parasitic fungi and insects]. Mel¬ 
ville T. Cook. Primer Informe An. Estacion Cen. Agronom. 
Cuba, 1:147-207. 1 June 1906. 


Nov. 1906] Index to North American Mycology 


253 


Inocybe sterlingii Peck, n. sp., under spruce trees. Bull. Torr. 
Bot. Club. 33:217. Apr. 1906. 

Inocybe desquamans Peck, n. sp., woods. Bull. Torr. Bot. Club, 
33:216. Apr. 1906. 

Kelerman, W. A. Index to North American Mycology (con¬ 
tinued). Jour. Mycol. 12:67-85. Mar. 1906. 

Kellerman, W. A. Notes from Mycological Literature XIX. 
Jour. Mycol. 12:128-135. May 1906. 

Kellerman, W. A. Obituary — Job B’icknell Ellis. Jour. My- 
coll. 12 :4i-5. Mar. 1906. 

Kern, Frank Dunn, see Arthur , Joseph Charles and . . . 

Kern, F. D., see Arthur , /. C. & Kern . . . 

Key to the Agariceae of Temperate North America. William A. 
Murrill. Torreya, 6:213-4. Dec. 1905. 

Key to the Assignment of Species of Peridermium, see Perider- 
mium, Key . . . 

Laboulbeniaceae, Ascus and Spore Formation, see Aseus 
and . . . 

Lachnea hemisphaerica, host to Verticillium discicedum Sacc. 
et Fairm. n. sp. Jour. Mycol. 12:50. Mar. 1906. 

Lawrence, W. H. The Powdery Mildews of Washington. 
Wash. State Agr. Exp. Sta. Bull. 70:1-16. 1905. 

Lecanidion indigoticum Sacc. Syll., syn. of Patellaria atrata f. 
indigo tic a q. v. 

Lentinus microspermus Peck, n. sp., decayed wood. Bull. Torr. 
Bot. Club, 33:2i6. Apr. 1906. 

Lentinus obconicus Peck, n. sp., decaying wood in a lumber 
yard. Bull. Torr. Bot. Club, 33:215. Apr. 1906. 

Lepiota nudipes Peck, n. sp. Bull. Torr. Bot. Club, 33 .*213. 
Apr. 1906. 

Leptosphaeria eustoma f. leguminosa Fairman n. sp., on the 
inner surface of pods of Robinia pseudacacia. Ann. My- 
colog. 4:327. Aug. 1906. 

Leptosphaeria lyndonvillae Fairman n. sp., on pods of Robinia 
pseudacacia. Ann. Mycolog. 4:326. Aug. 1906. 

Leptosphaeria lythri Peck n. sp., dead stem of the wing-angled 
loosestrife, Lythram alatum. Bull. Torr. Bot. Club, 33 :220 
Apr. 1906. 


254 Journal of Mycology [Vol. 12 

Leptosphaeria perplexa Sacc. et Fairm. n. sp., in caulibus emor- 
tuis Solidaginis sp. Jour. Mycol. 12 149. Mar. 1906. 

Leptosphaeria physostegiae Fairman n. sp., on dead stems of 
Physostegia virginiana Benth. Proc. Rochester Acad. Sci. 
4:216. March 1906. 

Leptospora sparsa Sacc. et Fairm. n. sp., ad ligna putrida in 
silvis. Jour. Mycol. 12 149. Mar. 1906. 

Leptospora stictochaetophora Fairman n. sp., on hard surface of 
decorticated maple twig, on ground in woods. Proc. Roch¬ 
ester Acad. Sci. 4:218. March 1906. 

Leptothyrium californicum Bubak n. sp., auf lebenden Blattern 
von Quercus morehus. Jour. Mycol. 12 :55. Mar. 1906. 

Leptothyrium dryadearum Desm., syn. of Marssonina potentil- 
lae q. v. 

Leptothyrium juglandis Lib., syn. of Marssonina juglandis q. v. 

Leptothyrium juglandis Lib., syn. of Marssonina potentillae 
q. v. 

Leptothyrium kellermanni Bubak n. sp., auf Blattern von Sas¬ 
safras officinalis. Jour. Mycol. 12:55. Mar. 1906. 

Leptothyrium pazschkeanum Bubak n. sp., auf toten Stengeln 
und Aesten von Asclepias verticillata. Jour. Mycol. 12:55. 
Mar. 1906. 

Lichen flora of Long Island, Additions to [List of 18 species.] 
G. C. Wood. Bryologist, 8:51. May 1905. 

Lichen Notes, No. 1. G. K. Merrill. Bryologist, 8:110-112. 
Nov. 1905. 

Lichen Notes, No. 2 G. K. Merrill, The Bryologist, 9:3~4. 
January 1906. 

Lichenology for Beginners. Frederick LeRoy Sargent. Bry¬ 
ologist, 8:45-8. May 1905. 

Lichenology for Beginners, II. Frederick LeRoy Sargent. 
Bryologist, 8:66-9. July 1905. 

Lichenology for Beginners, IV. Frederick LeRoy Sargent. 
Bryologist, 8:98-106. Nov. 1905. 

Lichens, Classification see Classification of . . . 

Lichens, How to Collect and Study. Bruce Fink. Bryologist, 
8:22-7. March 1905. 

Lichens, What to Note in the Macroscopic Study of. Bruce 
Fink. Bryologist, 8 T3-76. July 1905. 


Nov. 1906] Index to North A?nerica?i Mycology 


255 


Lloyd, C. G. Index of the Mycological Writings of. Vol. I., 
1898-1905. Cincinnati, Ohio, U. S. A. 20 pp. (May 

1905)- 

Lloyd, C. G. The Tylostomeae, illustrated. Pp. 1-28. PL 74- 
85. Feb. 1906. 

Longyear, B. O. A New Apple Rot [Alternaria sp. indescr.] 
Col. Agr. Exp. Sta. Bull. 105:1-12. PL I-IV. Nov. 1905, 

Lophantus nepetoides, host to Phoma lophanti Bubak n. sp. 
Jour. Mycol. 12153. Mar. 1906. 

Long Island Fungi and Slime-Moulds [List] see contributions 
10 . . . \ 

Long Island Lichen Flora. Addition to [List of 18 species]. G. 
C. Wood, Bryologist, 8:51. May 1905. 

Lupinus argenteus, host to Uromyces substriatus Syd., n. sp. 
Ann. Mycolog. 4:30. Feb. 1906. 

Lythrum alatum, host to Leptosphaeria lythri Peck n. sp. Bull. 
Torr. B'ot. Club, 33 1220. Apr. 1906. 

Macrospore, Megaspore or, see Megaspore or . . . 

Madrona de arbol, see Arctostaphylus tomentosa . . . 

Maple, decorticated twig, host to Leptospora stictochaetophora. 
Proc. Rochester Acad. Sci. 4:219. March 1906. 

Magnolia (acuminata?), host to Sphaeropsis magnoliae Ell. & 
Dearn. n. sp., No. 2087, Fungi Columbiani. 20 Mar. 1905. 

Maine, the Pileate Polyporaceae of Central, see Pileate . . . 

Marasmius nigripes Fr., syn. of Heliomyces nigripes q . v. 

Marasmius vialis Peck, syn. of Heliomyces vialis q. v. 

Marsonia Sacc. Syl., see Marssonia Fischer . . . 

Marsonia apicalis Ell. & Kellerm., syn. of Marssonina apicalis 
q. v. 

Marsonia baptesiae Ell. & Ev., syn. of Marssonina baptisiae q. v. 

Marsonia brunnes Sacc. Syll.; Gloeosporium brunneum Ell. & 
Ev., syn. of Marssonina brunnea q. v. 

Marsonia dalstrei Sacc. Syll., syn. of Marssonina delastrei q. v. 

Marsonia californica Ell. & Ev., syn. of Marssonina californica 
q. v. 

Marsonia fragariae Sacc. Syll., syn. of Marsonina fragariae q. v. 
Marsonia fraserae Ell. & Ev., syn. of Marssonina fraserae q. v. 
Marsonia brunnea Ell. & Ev., syn. of Marssonina brunnea q. v. 


256 Journal of Mycology [Vol. 12 

Marsonia graminicola Sacc. Syll., Gloeosporium graminicolum, 
Ell. & Ev., syn. of Marssonina graminicola q. v. 

Marsonia juglandis (Lib.) Sacc., syn. of Marssonina juglandis 
q. v. 

Marsonia martini Sacc. & Ell., syn, of Marssonina martinii q. v. 

Marsonia melitoti Trel., syn. of Marssonina meltoti q. v. 

Marsonia neilliae Harkn., syn. of Marssonina neilliae q. v. 

Marsonia nigricans Ell. & Kellerm., syn. of Marssonina nigri¬ 
cans q. v. 

Marsonia potentillae Sacc. Sylk, syn. of Marsonnina potentil- 
lae q. v. 

Marsonia potentillae helleri Peck, n. var., on living leaves of 
Drymocallis glandulosa (Lindl.) Rydb. Bull. Torr. Bot. 
Club, 33:219. Apr. 1906. 

Marsonia potentillae helleri Peck, syn. of Marssonina potentillae 
helleri {Peck) Kellerm. 

Marsonia quercus Sacc. Syll., syn. of Marssonina quercns q. v. 

Marsonia rhabdospora Ell. & Kellerm., syn. of Marssonina rhab- 
dospora q. v. 

Marsonia rhamni Ell. & Ev., syn. of Marssonina rhamni q. v. 

Marsonia ribicola Ell. & Ev., syn. of Marssonina ribicola q. v. 

Marsonia rubiginosa Ell. & Kellerm., syn. of Marssonina rnbigP 
nosa q. v. 

Marsonia stenospora Sacc. Syll.; Gloeosporium stenosporum 
Ell. & Kellerm., syn. of Marssonina stenospora q. v. 

Marsonia toxicodendri Sacc. Syll., syn. of Marssonina toxico- 
dendri q. v. 

Marsonia veratri Ell. & Ev., syn. of Marsonnina veratri q. v. 

Marsonia wyethiae Ell. & Ev., syn. of Marssonina zuyethiae q. v. 

Marssonia Fischer, syn. of Marssonina P. Mag. q. v. 

Marssonina P. Mag. n. n. [Marssonia Fischer.] Hedwigia, 
45 189. 19 Jan. 1906. 

Marssonina apicalis (Ell. & Ev.) P. Mag. n. n. [Marsonia api- 
calis E. & E.] Hedwigia, 45:89. 16 Jan. 1906. 

Marssonina baptisiae (Ell. & Ev.) P. Mag. n. n. [Marsonia 
baptisiae Ell. & Ev.] Hedwigia, 45:91. 16 Jan. 1906. 

Marssonina brunnea (Ell. & Ev.) P. Mag. n. n. [Marsonia 
brunnea Sacc. Syll., Gloeosporium brunneum Ell. & Ev.] 
Hedwigia, 45 :89- 19 Jan. 1906. 


Nov. 1906] Index to North American Mycology 


257 


Marssonina californica (Ell. & Ev.) P. Mag. n. n. [Marsonia 
californica E. & E,] Hedwigia, 45 190. 16 Jan. 1906. 

Marssonina delastrei (DeLacr.) P. Mag. n. n. [Gloeosporium 
delastrei DeLacr.; Marsonia delastrei Sacc. Syll.] Hedwigia, 
45 190. 16 Jan. 1906. 

Marssonina fraserae (Ell. & Ev.) P. Mag. n. n. [Marsonia 
fraserae Ell. & Ev.] Hedwigia, 45:91. 16 Jan. 1906. 

Marssonina graminicola (Ell. & Ev.) P. Mag. n. n. [Gloeo¬ 
sporium graminicolum Ell. & Ev.; Marsonia graminicola 
Sacc. Syll.] Hedwigia, 45:91. 16 Jan. 1906. 

Marssonina juglandis (Lib.) P. Mag. n. n. [Marsonia jug- 
landis Sacc. Syll.; Leptothyrium juglandis Lib.; Gloeo¬ 
sporium juglandis (Lib.) Mont.] Hedwigia, 45 :90. 16 Jan. 
1906. 

Marssonina martini (Sacc. & Ell.) P. Mag. n. n. [Marsonia 
martini Sacc. & Ell.] Hedwigia, 45:90. 16 Jan. 1906. 

Marssonina meliloti (Trel.) P. Mag. n. n. [Marsonia meliloti 
Trel.] Hedwigia, 45:91. 16 Jan. 1906. 

Marssonina necans (Ell. & Ev.) P. Mag. n. n. [Marsonia 
necans Ell. & Ev.] Hedwigia, 45:91. 16 Jan. 1906. 

Marssonina neilliae (Hark.) P. Mag. n. n. [Marsonia neilliae 
Hark.] Hedwigia, 45:90. 16 Jan. 1906. 

Marssonina nigricans (Ell. & Ev.) P. Mag. n. n. [Marsonia 
nigricans E. & E..] Hedwigia, 45:89. 16 Jan. 1906. 

Marssonina potentillae (Desm.) P. Mag. n. n. [Gloeosporium 
potentillae (Resm.) Oud.; Phyllosticta potentillae Desm.; 
Leptothyrium dryadearum Desm.; Septoria potentillarum 
Fuck. ; Marsonia potentillae var. fragariae Sacc. Syll.] Hed¬ 
wigia, 45 :90. 16 Jan. 1906. 

Marssonina potentillae helleri (Peck) Kellerm. n. n. 

[Marsonia potentillae helleri Peck.] 

Marssonina quercus (Peck) P. Mag. n. n. [Marsonia quercus 
Peck.] Hedwigia, 45:90. 16 Jan. 1906. 

Marssonina rhamni (Ell. & Ev.) P. Mag. n. n. [Marsonia rham- 
ni Ell. & Ev.] Hedwigia, 45:90. 16 Jan. 1906. 

Marssonina rhabdospora (Ell. & Ev.) P. Mag. n. n. [Marsonia 
rhabdospora E. & E.] Hedwigia, 45 :89- 16 Jan. 1906. 

Marssonina ribicola (Ell. & Ev.) P. Mag. n. n. [Marsonia ribi- 
cola Ell. & Ev.] Hedwigia, 45:90. 16 Jan. 1906. 

Marssonina rubiginosa (Ell. & Ev.) P. Mag. n. n. [Marsonia 
rubiginosa E. & E.] Hedwigia, 45:89. 16 Jan. 1906. 


258 


Journal oj Mycology 


[Vol. 12 


Marssonina stenospora (Ell. & Kellerm.) P. Mag. n. n. [Gloeo- 
sporium stenosporum Ell. & Kellerm. ; Marsonia stenospora 
Sacc. Syll.] Hedwigia, 45:89. 16 Jan. 1906. 

Marssonina toxicodendri (Ell. & Mart.) P. Mag. n. n. [Mar¬ 
sonia toxicodendri Ell. & Mart.] Hedwigia, 45:90. 16 Jan.. 
1906. 

Marssonina veratri (Ell. & Ev.) P. Mag. n. n. [Marsonia vera- 
tri Ell. & Ev.] Hedwigia, 45:91. 16 Jan. 1906. 

Marssonina wyethiae (Ell. & Ev.) P. Mag. n. n. ]Marsonia 
wyethiae Ell. & Ev. [ Hedwigia, 45:91. 16 Jan. 1906. 

Mass aria platanoides Rehm. n. sp., on bark of dead prostrate 
trunks of trees. Ann. Mycolog. 4:336. Aug. 1906. 

Massee, George. A fungus parasite on a moss [Epicoccum 
torquens Massee n. sp.] Torreya, 6:48-50. Mar. 1906. 

Megaptertium fremonti, host to Uromyces fremonti Syd., n. sp. 
Ann. Mycolog. 4:29, Feb. 1906. 

Megaspore or Macrospore [Mega, Gr. me gas, great or large is 
the opposite of micro; Macro, Gr. macros, means long, not 
the opposite of micro, but of brachus meaning short.] 
Charles J. Chamberlain, Science N. S. 23:8i9- 25 May 

1906. 

Metasphaeria leguminosa Fairman n. sp., on inner surface of 
pods of Robinia pseudacacia. Ann. Mycolog. 4:328. Aug. 
1906. 

Metasphaeria lyndonvillae Fairman n. sp., on inner surfaces 
of pods of Robinia pseudacacia. Ann. Mycolog. 4:328. Aug. 
1906. 

Merrill, G. K. Lichen Notes, No. 1. Bryologist, 8:110-112. 
Nov. 1905. 

Merrill, G. K. Lichen Notes, No. 2. The Bryologist, 9:3-4. 
January 1906. 

Mildews, Powdery, of Washington. W. H. Lawrence. Wash. 
State Agr. Exp. Sta. Bull. 70:1-16. 1905. 

Mildews, sexual reproduction and organization of the nucleus in. 
certain, see Sexual Reproduction and . . . 

Micromycetes Americani Novi. P. A. Saccardo. Jour. Mycol. 
12:47~52. Mar. 1906. 

Micropera ampelina Sacc. et Fairm. n. sp., in ramulis nondum 
emortuis Vitis viniferae. Jour. Mycol. 12 49. Mar. 1906. 

Monilia avenae Peck n. sp., on living or languishing leaves of 
some unidentified species of Avena. Bull. Torr. Bot. Clubp. 
33:219. Apr. 1906. 


Nov. 1906] Index to North American Mycology 


259 


Morus alba, cultae, host to Phyllosticta consors Sacc. n. sp. 
[Mexico]. Jour. Mycol. 12:51. Mar. 1906. 

Moss, Pogonatum alpinum Roehl., host to Craterellus pogonati 
Peck, n. sp. Bull. Torr. Bot. Club, 33:218. Apr. 1906. 

Moulds as the Cause of Disease [a note concerning aspergillosis 
— disease of the lungs caused by Aspergillus fumigatus.] 
Plant World, 8:128-130. May 1905. 

Morgan, A. P. North American Species of Heliomyces. [Mono¬ 
graph.] Jour. Mycol. 12:89-92. May 1906. 

Muchmoria Sacc. n. gen. Dematiacearum. Ann. Mycolog. 4:277. 

5 June 1906. 

Muchmoria portoricensis Sacc. n. sp., in rimis corticis arboris 
emortuae indet. Ann. Mycolog. 4:278. 5 June 1906. 

Mucor stolonifer, for the zygospores, see Culture Medium . . . 

Mummy Disease of Guavas, see Ripe Rot or Mummy . . . 

Murrill, William A. A Key to the Agariceae [sub-family of 
the Polyporaceae] of Temperate North America. Torreya, 
6:213-4. Dec. 1905. 

Murrill, William A. The Pileate Polyporaceae of Central 
Maine [a list of about 3 dozen species; and description of 
Polyporus fagicola n.'sp.] Torreya, 6:34-7. Feb. 1906. 

Mycologicae, see Notae Mycologicae . . . 

Mycological Society, New Orleans Meeting, see Amrican My- 
cological . . . 

Mycological Writings of G. C. Lloyd. Index of, see Lloyd y 

G. C. . . . 

Naemosphaera fairmani Sacc. n. sp., in areis dealbatis trunci 
Aceris sp. Ann. Mycolog. 4:276. 5 June 1906. 

Nature and Origin of the Binucleated Cells in some Basidomy- 
cetes. Susie Percival Nichols. Trans. Wise. Acad. Sci. Arts 

6 Let. 15:30-70. PI. IV-VI. 1904 (issued 1905). 

Neue Pilze aus Nord Amerika. Fr. B’ubak. Jour. Mycol. 12 :52-6. 
Mar. 1906. 

Neocosmospora, Parasitism of [weak parasite on Ginseng]. 
Howard S. Reed. Science, N. S. 23:751-2. 11 May 1906. 

Neue und kritische Uredineen — IV. H. & P. Sydow. Ann. 
Mycolog. 4 :28~32. Feb. 1906. 

New Fungi, American, see Micromycetes Americani Novi . . . 
New Genera. Second supplement, see Second Supplement . . . 


260 


Journal of Mycology 


[Vol. 12 


New or Rare Pyrenomyceteae from Western New York. Charles 
E. Fairman. Proc. Rochester Acad. Sci. 4:215-224. PI. XX- 
XXII. March 1906. 

New Rossellinia from Nicaragua, R. Bakeri. J. B. Ellis. Tor- 
reya, 5 187. May 1905. 

New Species of Fungi, Charles Horton Peck. Bull. Torr. Bot. 
Club, 33:213-221. April 1906. 

Nichols, Susie Percival. Nature and Origin of the Binucleated 
Cells in some Basidiomycetes. Trans. Wise. Acad. Sci. Arts 
& Let. 15:30-70. PI. IV-VI. 1904 (issued 1905). 

Nomenclature of Fungi Having Many Fruit-forms. J. C. 
Arthur. Plant World, 8:71-76, 99-103. Mar. & Apr. 1905. 

North American species of Heliomyces [Monograph.] A. P. 
Morgan. Jour. My col. 12 :89-92. May 1906. 

Nortli American species of Peridermium. J. C. Arthur & F. D. 
Kern. [Abstract.] Science, N. S. 23:203. 9 Feb. 1906. 

North American species of Peridermium. Joseph Charles Ar¬ 
thur and Frank Dunn Kern. Bull. Torr. Bot. Club 33 403- 
438. Aug. 1906. 

Notae Mycologicae, [2 new genera and many new species.] P. 
A. Saccardo. Ann. Mycolog. 4:273-8. 5 June 1906. 

Notes from Mycological Literature, XIX. W. A. Kellerman. 
Jour. Mycol. 12:128-135. May 1906. 

Notes, Further, on Cladonias, VI. Bruce Fink. The Bryologist, 
9:21-4. Mar. 1906. 

Notes on Fungus Diseases, etc., for 1904. G. P. Clinton. Conn. 
Agr. Exp. Sta. Report 1904:311-328. PI. XVIII-XXVIII. 
May 1905. 

Notwendige Umanderung des Namens der Pilzgattung Mar- 
sonia Fisch. [changed to Marssonina] P. Magnus. Hedwigia, 
45:88-91. 16 Jan. 1906. 

Obituary — Job Bicknell Ellis. W. A. Kellerman. Jour. Mycol. 
12:41-5. Mar. 1906. 

Observations on the Wintering of Grain Rusts. A. H. Christ¬ 
man. Trans. Wise. Acad. Sci. Arts & Let. 15:98-107. 1904 

(issued 1905). 

Oenothera (Megapterium) fremonti, host to Uromyces fre- 
monti Syd. n. sp. Ann. Mycolog. 4:29. Feb. 1906. 

Olive, Edgar W. Cytological Studies on the Entomophthoraceae. 
I, The Morphology and Development of Empusa. Bot. Gaz. 
41 :i92-2o6. PI. XIV-XV. Mar. 1906. 


Nov. 1906] Index to North American Mycology 


261 


Olive, Edgar W. Cytological Studies in Entomophthoraceae. 
II,Nuclear and Cell Division of Empusa. B'ot. Gaz. 411229- 
260. PI. XVI. Apr. 1906. 

Olive, Edgar W. The Morphology and Development of Em¬ 
pusa. Bot. Gaz. 41:192-206. PL XIV-XV. Mar. 1906. 

Ophiobolus sceliscophorus Fairman n. sp., on leaves of Phlox 
drummondii. Proc. Rochester Acad. Sci. 4:215. March 
1906. 

Orton, W. A. Plant Diseases in 1905. Yearbook U. S. Dept. 
Agr. 1905:602-611. 1906. 

Ostrya virginica, host to Teichospora praeclara Rehm n. sp.. 
Ann. Mycolog. 4:33d. Aug. 1906. • * 

Othiella fairmani Sacc. n. sp., ad cortices dejectos in silvis. 
Jour. Mycol. 12:48. Mar. 1906. 

Outline for the observation of some of the more common Fungi. 
George F. Atkinson. Plant World, 8:215-222, 245-255. 
Sept, and October 1905. 

Panaeolus retirugis the Rate of Growth of. Gertrude E. Doug¬ 
las. Torreya, 6:157-165. Aug. 1905. 

Paraphyses in the Genus Glomerella. John L. Sheldon. Sci¬ 
ence, N. S., 23:851-2. 1 June 1906. 

Parasitism of Neocosmospora [weak parasite on Ginseng]. How¬ 
ard S. Reed. Science, N. S. 23:751-2. 11 May 1906. 

Patellaria atrata f. indigotica (C. et P.) Rehm (Patellaria 
indigotica C et. P.; Lecanidion indigoticum Sacc. Syll.) 
Ann. Mycolog. 4:337. Aug. 1906. 

Patellaria indigotica C. et P., syn. of Patellaria atrata f. in¬ 
digotica q. v. 

Pear Scab [Fusicladium pirinum Lib.]. Ralph E. Smith. Calif. 
Agr. Exp. Sta. Bull. 163:1-18. Dec. 1904 [issued 1905.] 

Peck, Charles Horton. New species of Fungi. Bull. Torr. Bot. 
Club, 33:213-221 Apr. 1906. 

Peridermium, Analytical Key to Species [Arthur and Kern]. 
Bull. Torr. Bot. Club, 33 :4o8-4io. Aug. 1906. 

Peridermium, Host Key. [Arthur & Kern.] Bull. Torr. Bot. 
Club, 33:410-412. Aug. 1906. 

Peridermium, Key to the Assignment of Species of. [Arthur & 
Kern]. Bull. Torr. Bot. Club, 33:407. Aug. 1906. 

Peridermium boreale Arth. & Kern n. sp., on Picea parryana 
(Andre) Parry, (P. pungens Englm.), Picea engelmanni 
(Parry) Englm. Bull. Tor. Bot. Club, 33:425. Aug. 1906. 


262 


Journal of Mycology 


[Vol. 12 


Peridermium cerebrum Peck and Cronartium quercuum (Berk.) 
[Cultures, etc.], C. L. Shear. Jour. Mycol. 12:89-92. May 
1906. 

Peridermium cerebrum Peck. [syn. Per. gigantium (Mayr) Tu- 
beuf]. C. L. Shear. Jour. Mycol. 12:89-92. May 1906. 

Peridermium delicatalum Arth. & Kern n. sp., on leaves of Pinus 
sp. Bull. Torr. Bot. Club, 33:412. Aug. 1906. 

Peridermium fusiforme Arth. & Kern n. sp., on branches of 
Pinus taeda L, P. palustris, P. sp. Bull. Torr. Bot. Club, 
33:421. Aug. 1906. 

Peridermium gigantium (Mayr) Tubeuf, syn of Per. cerebrum 
q. v . 

Peridermium globosum Arth & Kern n. sp., on Strobus strobus 
(L.) Small (Pinus strobus L.). Bull. Torr. Bot. Club, 
33:424. Aug. 1906. 

Peridermium gracile Arth. & Kern n. sp., on leaves of Pinus 
hlifolia Lindl. [Mexico.]. Bull. Torr. Bot. Club, 33:418. 
Aug. 1906. 

Peridermium intermedium Arth. & Kern n. sp., on leaves of 
Pinus echinata Mill. (P. mitis Mx.). Bull. Torr. Bot. Club, 
33:4i6. Aug. 1906. 

Peridermium mexicanum Arth. & Kern n. sp., on branches of 
Pinus patula Schiede & Deppe, P. oocarpa Scheide. Bull. 
Torr. Bot. Club, 33 :422. Aug. 1906. 

Peridermium montanum Arth & Kern n. sp., on leaves of Pinus 
scopulorum (Englm.) Lemm., & P. murrayana Oreg. Com. 
Bull. Torr. Bot. Club, 33:413. Aug. 1906. 

Peridermium, North American Species of, see North American. 

Peridermium stalactiforme Arth. & Kern n. sp., on branches of 
Pinus murrayana, Oreg. Com., & P. jeffreyi Oreg. Com. 
Bull. Torr. Bot. Club, 33 :4I9. Aug. 1906. 

Peronoplasmopara cubensis (B. & C.) Clint, n. comb. [Perono- 
spora cubensis B. & C.; Plasmopara cubensis Humphrey; 
Plasmopara [Peronoplasmopara] cubensis Berk; Perono- 
spora cubensis var. atra Zimm.; Pseudoperonospora cu¬ 
bensis Rostov.: Pseudoperonospora cubensis var. twerien- 
sis Rostow.] Conn. Agr. Exp. Sta. Rep. 1904:335. May 
I 905 - 

Peronoplasmopara cubensis (B. & C.) Clint., see Dozvny Mil¬ 
dew. 

Peronospora cubensis var. atra Zimm. syn. of Peronoplasmopara 
cubensis q. v. 


Nov. 1906 ] Index to North American Mycology 263 

Peronospora cubensis B. & C. syn of Peronoplasmopara cu~ 
bensis q. v. 

Peronospora parasitica on Cauliflower, On the Occurrence of. 
Hermann von Schrenk. An. Rep. Mo. Bot. Gar. 16:121-4. 
PL 22-4. 1905. 

Persea gratissima, Aguacate, host of Hendersonia mexicana 
Sacc. n. sp. [Mexico.] Jour. Mycol. 12:51. Mar. 1906. 

Persica vulgaris, host to Plaplosporella missouriensis Babak n. 
sp. Jour. Mycol. 12:54. Mar. 1906. 

Peziza nyssaegena Ellis, syn. of Sclerotinia nysssaegena q. v. 

Phleospora hanseni Bubak 11. sp., auf lebenden Blattern von 
Quercus morehus. Jour. Mycol. 12:54. Mar. 1906. 

Phlox, dead stems, host to Pleospora magnifica Peck n. sp., 
Bull. Torr. Bot. Club, 33:221. Apr. 1906. 

Phlox drummondii, host to Ophiobolus sceliscophorus Fairman 
n. sp. Proc. Rochester Acad. Sci. 4:215. March 1906. 

Pholiota cubensis Earle n. sp. [Cuba.] Informe An. Estac. 
Agronom. Cuba, 1:242. 1 June 1906. 

Pholiotinia Fayod, Pholiota (Hygrophanae) Sacc. [Earle.] 
Informe An. Estac. Agronom. Cuba, 1:24i. 1 June 1906. 

Pholiotinia musae Earle n. sp. [Cuba.] Informe An. Estac. 
Agronom. Cuba, 1:24i. 1 June 1906. 

Phoma lophanthi Bubak n. sp. [Septoria lophanthi Ellis ined., 
not Septoria lophanthi Winter], auf toten Stengeln von Lo- 
phanthus nepetoides. Jour. Mycol. 12:53. Mar. 1906. 

Phomopsis majuscula Sacc. n. sp., in ramis emortius Tecomae 
radicantis. Ann. M)^colog. 4:275. 5 June 1906. 

Phomopsis missouriensis Bubak n. sp., auf toten Stengeln von 
Asclepias verticillata. Jour. Mycol. 12:53. Mar. 1906. 

Phyllosticta consors Sacc. n. sp., in maculis ochraceo-brunneis 
Phleosporae ad folia Mori albae cultae [Mexico]. Jour. 
Mycol. 12:51. Mar. 1906. 

Phyllosticta convexula Bubak n. sp., auf Blattern von Carya 
tomentosa. Jour. Mycol. 12:52. Mar. 1906. 

Phyllosticta potentillae Desm., syn. of Marssonina potentillae 
q. v. 

Phyllotus hygrophanus Earle n. sp. [Cuba.] Informe An. 
Estac. Cen. Agronom. Cuba, 1:2?3. 1 June 1906. 

Phyllotus imbricatus Earle n. sp. [Cuba.] Informe An. Estac. 
Cen. Agronom. Cuba, 1:233. 1 June 1906. 


264 


Journal oj Mycology 


[Vol. 12 


Phyllotus Karst. [(Pleurotus) Resupinati, i. parte] Sacc. SylL 
[Earle] Informe An. Estac. Cen. Agronom. Cuba, i :23s* 
1 June 1906. 

Physostegia virginiana Benth., host to Leptosphaeria physos- 
tegia Fairman n. sp. Proc. Rochester Acad. Sci. 4:216. 
March 1906. 

Phytophthora infestans (Mont.) DeBy. [Clinton.], see Downy 
Mildew. 

Picea parryana (Andre) Parry (P. pungens Englm.) host to 
Peridermium boreale Arth. & Kern n. sp. Bull. Torr. Bot. 
Club, 33 1425. Aug. 1906. 

Pileate Polyporaceae of Central Maine [a list of about three 
dozen species; and description of Polyporus fagicola n. sp.] 
William A. Murrill. Torreya, 6:34-7. Feb. 1906. 

Pinus echinata Mill. (P. mitis Mx.), host to Peridermium in¬ 
termedium Arth & Kern n. sp. Bull. Torr. Bot. CluJ!>, 
33:4i6. Aug. 1906. 

Pinus filifolia Lindl., host to Peridermium gracile Arth. & Kern 
n. sp. Bull. Torr. Bot. Club, 33:418. Aug. 1906. 

Pinus jeffreyi Oreg. Com., host to Peridermium stalactiforme 
Arth. & Kern n. sp. Bull. Torr. Bot. Club, 33 :4i9- Aug. 
1906. 

Pinus mitis Mx., see Pinus echinata Mill. 

Pinus murrayana Oreg. Com. host to Peridermium stalactifornte 
Arth. & Kern n. sp. Bull. Torr. Bot. Club, 33 ‘.419. Aug. 
1906. 

Pinus murrayana Oreg Com. (Englm.) Lemm., host to Peri¬ 
dermium montanum Arth. & Kern n. sp. Bull. Torr. Bot. 
Club, 33:413. Aug. 1906. 

Pinus oocarpa Schiede, host to Peridermium mexicanum Arth. 
& Kern. n. sp. Bull. Torr. Bot. Club, 33:423. Aug. 1906. 

Pinus palustris Mill., host to Peridermium fusiforme Arth. & 
Kern. n. sp. Bull. Torr. Bot. Club, 33:422. Aug. 1906. 

Pinus patula Schiede & Deppe, host to Peridermium mexicanum 
Arth. & Kern n. sp. Bull. Torr. Bot. Club, 33 ^23. Aug. 
1906. 

Pinus scopulorum (Englm.) Lemm., host to Peridermium mon¬ 
tanum Arth. & Kern n. sp. Bull. Torr. Bot. Club, 33:413.. 
Aug. 1906. 

Pinus strobus L., see Strobus strobus (L.) Small. 

Pinus taeda L., host to Peridermium fusiforme Arth. & Kern n_ 
sp. Bull. Torr. Bot. Club, 33:422. Aug. 1906. 


Nov. 1906] Index to North American Mycology 


265 


Pinus sp., host to Peridermium fusiforme Arth. & Kern n. sp. 
Bull. Torr. Bot. Club, 33:422. Aug. 1906. 

Pinus sp., host to Peridermium delicatalum Arth. & Kern n. sp. 
Bull. Torr. Bot. Club, 33 413. Aug. 1906. 

Placographa (Patinella) mexicana Rehm n. sp., ad lignum pu- 
tridum. Ann. Mycolog. 4:337. Aug. 1906. 

Plant Diseases in 1005. W. A. Orton. Yearbook U. S. Dept. 
Agr. 1905:602-611. 1906. 

Plant Diseases of the State, A Report on the. John L. Sheldon. 
W. Va. Agr. Exp. Sta. Bull. 96:68-99. 6 PI. June 30 1905. 

Plasmopara [Peronoplasmopara] cubensis Berl. syn. of Perono- 
plasmopara cubensis q. v. 

Plasmopara cubensis Humph, syn. of Peronoplasmopara cuben¬ 
sis q. v. 

Pleospora aureliana Fairman n. sp., on the outer surface of pods 
of Robinia pseudacacia. Ann. Mycolog. 4:328. Aug. 1906. 

Pleospora magnifica Peck n. sp., dead stems of Phlox. Bull. 
Torr. Bot. Club, 33:221. Apr. 1906. 

Pleurotus Hollandianus sp. nov. [Description]. D. R. Sum- 
stine. Jour. Mycol. 12:59. Mar. 1906. 

P ocillaria (P Browne) Kuntze [Lentinus (Critini) Sacc.] 
[Earle]. Informe An. Estac. Cen. Agronom. Cuba, 1:230. 
1 June 1906. 

P ocillaria cinnamomea Earle n. sp. [Cuba.] Informe An. Es¬ 
tac. Cen. Agronom. Cuba, 1:231. 1 June 1906. 

Pocillaria palmeri Earle n. sp. [Cuba.] Informe An. Estac. 
Cen. Agronom. Cuba, 1 '.2^2. 1 June 1906. 

Pocillaria reflexa Earle n. sp. Informe An. Estac. Cen. Agro¬ 
nom. Cuba, 1:23i. 1 June 1906. 

Pocillaria similans Earle n. sp. [Cuba.] Informe An. Estac. 
Cen. Agronom. Cuba, 1 '.2^2. 1 June 1906. 

Pocillaria vestida Earle, n. sp. [Cuba.] Informe An. Estac. 
Cen. Agronom. Cuba, 1:231. 1 Tune 1906. 

Pogonatum alpinum Roehl., host to Craterellus pogonati Peck, 
n. sp., Bull. Torr. Bot. Club, 33 :2i8. Apr. 1906. 

Pollock, J. B. Some Factors in the color production in a species 
of Fusarium. Science, N. S. 23:422-3. 16 Mar. 1906. 

Polyporaceae of Centrol Maine, see Pileate Polyporaceae. . . 

Polyporus hypococinnus Berk, syn. of Aurantiporus pylotae q . v . 


Journal oj Mycology 


266 


[Vol. 12 


Polyporus obtusus Berk., see Disease of Black Oaks caused 
by. . . 

Polyporus pini-canadensis Schw., syn. of Aurantiporus pilotae 
q. v. 

Polyporus pilotae Schw., syn. of Aurantiporus pilotae q. v. 

Poronia macrospora Peck n. sp., rich sandy ground in a gar¬ 
den. Bull. Torr. Bot. Club, 33:220. Apr. 1906. 

1 Powdery Mildews of Washington. W. H. Lawrence. Wash. 
State Agr. Exp. Sta. Bull. 70:1-16. 1905. 

Preliminary List of Higher Fungi collected in the vicinity of 
St. Louis, Mo., from 1898 to 1905. N. M. Glatfelter. Trans. 
Acad. Sci. St. Louis, 16:33-94. 14 Tune 1906. 

Prunus virginiana, host to Dichomera prunicola Ell. & Dearn. 
n. sp. No. 2021, Fungi Columbiana. 20 Mar. 1905. 

Psathyrella angusticips Peck, n. sp., grassy ground. Bull. 
Torr. Bot. Club, 33:217. April 1906. 

Pseudomonas vascularum, see Gumming of the Sugar-Cane. 

Pseudoperonospora cubensis Rostow, syn. of Peronoplasmopara 
cubensis q. v. 

Pseudoperonospora cubensis var. tweriensis, syn. of Peronoplas¬ 
mopara cubensis q. v. 

Pseudostegia Bubak n. g. Melanconiacearum. Jour. Mycol. 
12:56. Mar. 1906. 

Pseudostegia nubilosa Bubak n. sp, auf toten Slattern von Carex 
sp. Jour. Mycol. 12:56. Mar. 1906. 

Pseudostegia nubilosa (E. & E.) Bubak n. n. [Cryptosporium 
nubilosum E. & E.] Jour. Mycol. 12:56. Mar. 1906. 

Ptilosia lactucina, host to Puccinia ptilosiae Bubak n. sp. Jour. 
Mycol. 12:52. Mar. 1906. 

Puccinia aemulans Syd. n. sp., in foliis Gymnolomiae multi¬ 
florae. Ann. Mycolog. 4:31. Feb. 1906. 

Puccinia caricis-polystachyae Diet. n. sp., on Carex polystachya 
Wahl., [Mexico.] Ann. Mycolog. 4:3o6. Aug. 1906. 

Puccinia fuchsiae Syd. et Holw., in foliis vivis Fuchsiae thymi- 
foliae. [Mexico.] Ann. Mycolog. 4:30. Feb. 1906. 

Puccinia ptilosiae Bubak,^ auf Blaattern von Ptilosia lactucina. 
Jour. Mycol. 12:52. Mar. 1906. 

Puccinia solidaginis-mollis Diet. n. sp., on Solidago mollis Bartl. 
Ann. Mycolog. 4:308. Aug. 1906. 

Pyrenomyceteae, new or rare, see New or Rare. . . 


Nov. 1906] Index to North American Mycology 


267 


Pyrenomyceteae novae in leguminibus Robiniae. Charles E. 
Fairman. Ann. Mycolog. 4:326-8. Aug. 1906. 

Pyrenophora ampla Syd. n. sp., in foliis petiolisque emortuis 
Anemones totonensis. Ann. Mycolog. 4:343. Aug. 1906. 

Quercus morehus, host to Leptothyrium californicum Bubak n. 
sp. Jour. Mycol. 12155. Mar. 1906. 

Quercus morehus, host to Phelospora hanseni Bubak n. sp. Jour. 
Mycol. 12:54. Mar. 1906. 

Rate of Growth of Panaeolus retirugis, see Panaeolus. . . 

Reed, George M. Infection Experiments with Erysiphe graminis 
DC. Trans. Wise. Acad. Sci. Arts & Let. 15:135-162. 1904 
issued 1905. 

Reed, Howard S. Parasitism of Neocosmospora [weak parasite 
on ginseng.] Science N. S. 23:751-2. 11 May 1906. 

Reed, Howard J. Three Fungous Diseases of the Cultivated 
Ginseng [Vermicularia dematium, Pestalozzia funera, Neo¬ 
cosmospora vasinfecta.] Mo. Agr. Exp. Sta. Bull. 69:43-65. 
Oct. 1905. 

Reichling, G. A. Contributions to the recorded Fungus and 
Slime-Mould Flora of Long Island [list of 20 species]. 
Torreya, 5 :85~7. May 1905. 

Report of the Botanist. G. P. Clinton. Conn. Agr. Ex. Sta. 
Report, 1904:311-384. PI. XVIII-XXXVII. May 1905. 

Report of the Botanist [N. J. Exp. Sta. 1905] Fungi as re¬ 
lated to Weather and Fungi upon the Experiment Grounds 
[in report of Botanical Department. Extracts from 
“Weather and Crop Bulletin” and notes on the occurrences 
of a few parasitic fungi]. Byron D. Halsted, Earle J. 
Owen, and Jacob H. Shaw. Rep. N. J. Agr. Coll. Exp. 
Sta. 1905:510-517. 1906. 

Reproduction, sexual, in certain Mildews, see Sexual. 

Rhabdospora demetriana Bubak n. sp., auf trockenen Stengeln 
und Aesten von Aesclepias verticillata. Jour. Mycol. 12 :54. 
Mar. 1906. 

Ricker, P. L. Second Supplement to New Genera of Fungi 
published since the year 1900, with citation and the original 
descriptions. Jour. Mycol. 12:60-67, 95-102. March and 
May 1906. 

Riddle, Lincoln Ware. On the Cvtology of the Entomophthor- 
aceae. Proc. Am. Acad. Arts and Sci. 42:177-198. PI. 1-3. 
August 1906. 


268 


Journal of Mycology 


[Vol. 12 


Ripe-rot or Mummy Disease of Guavas [Gloeosporium psidii G. 
Del.] John L. Sheldon. W. Va. Agr. Exp. Sta. Bull. 
104:297-315. PI. -IV. 1 Apr. 1906. 

Robinia pseudacacia, pods, host to Leptosphaeria eustoma f. 
leguminosa Fairman n. sp. Ann. Mycolog. 4:327. Aug. 
1906. 

Robinia pseudacacia, pods, host to Metasphaeria leguminosa 
Fairman n. sp. Ann. Mvcolog. 4:328. Aug. 1906. 

Robinia pseudacacia, host to Leptosphaeria lydonvillae Fairman 
n. sp. Ann. Mycolog. 4:326. Aug. 1906. 

Robinia Pseudacacia, pods, host to Metasphaeria lyndonvillae 
Fairman n. sp. Ann. Mycolog. 4:328. Aug. 1906. 

Robinia pseudacacia, pods, host to Pleospora aureliana Fairman 
n. sp. Ann. Mycolog. 4:328. Aug. 1906. 

Robinia pseudacacia L., host to Sporormia leguminosa Fairman 
n. sp. Proc. Rochester Acad. Sci. 4:217. March 1906. 

Rossellinia bakeri Ellis n. sp., on Urera. [Nicaragua.] Tor- 
reya, 5:87. May 1905. 

Rossellina etaeospora Sacc. et Fairm. n. sp., ad truncos putre- 
scentes dejectos in silvos. Jour. Mycol. 12:48. Mar. 1906. 

Rot, A New Apple, see Longyear , B. O. A New. 

Russula nigrescentipes Peck, n. sp., in woods. Bull. Torr. Bot. 
Club, 33:214. Apr. 1906. 

Russulas of Madison and Vicinity. H. R. Denniston. Trans. 
Wise. Acad. Sci. Arts & Let. 15:71-88. 1904. (issued 

1905)- 

Russula subvelutina Peck, n. sp. Bull. Torr. Bot. Club, 33:215. 
April 1906. 

Rust Notes for 1905. J. M. Bates. Jour. Mycol. 12:45-47. 
Mar. 1906. 

Rust parasites [of Asparagus Rust; Darluca filum Cast., Tuber- 
cularia persicaria Ditt., and Cladosporium herbarum Link.] 
Ralph E. Smith in Asparagus and Asparagus Rust in Cal¬ 
ifornia. Calif. Agr. Exp. Sta. Bull. 165:91-4. 1 Apr. 1905. 

Rust [Macrosporium cucumerinum] - Resisting Cantaloupe. 
Philo K. Blinn. Col. Agr. Exp. Sta. Bull. 104:1-15. PL 
V-X. Nov. 1905. 

Saccaroo, P. A. Micromycetes Americani Novi. Jour. Mycol. 
12:47-52. Mar. 1906. 

Saccaroo, P. A. Notae Mycologicae [two new genera and many 
new species]. Ann. Mycolog. 4:273-8. 5 June 1906. 


Nov. 1906] Index to North American Mycology 


269 


Salix, dead limbs, host to Schizoxylon dermateoides Rehm n. 
sp. Ann. Mycolog. 4:337. Aug. iqo6. 

Salix, decorticated branches, host to Lophiostoma pruni E. & 
E. Proc. Rochester Acad. Sci. 4:215. March 1906. 

Sarcoscypha dawsonensis Peck, n. sp., among mosses Lepto- 
bryum pyriforme Schimp. Bull. Torr. Bot. Club, 331220. 
April 1906. 

Sargent, Frederick LeRoy. Lichenology for Beginners. Bry- 
ologist, 8:45-8. May 1905. 

Sargent, Frederick LeRoy, Lichenology for Beginners, II. 
Bryologist, 8:66-9. July 1905. 

Sargent, Frederick LeRoy. Lichenology for Beginners, IV. 
Bryologist, 8:98-106. Nov. 1905. 

Sassafras officinalis, host to Leptothyrium kellermanni Bubfik 
n. sp. Jour. Mycol. 12:55. Mar. 1906. 

Schizoxylon dermateoides Rehm n. sp., on dead limbs of Salix 
in woods. Ann. Mycolog. 4:336. Aug. 1906. 

Schneider, Albert. Classification of Lichens [referring partic¬ 
ularly to treatment in Pflanzenfamilien by Fiinfstuck and 
Zahlbruckner]. Torreya, 5:79~82. May 1905. 

Schrenk, Flerman von. On the Occurrence of Peronospora par¬ 
asitica on Cauliflower. A11. Rep. Mo. Bot. Gar. 16:121-4. 
PI. 22-4. 1905. 

Sclerotinia johnsonii (E. & E.) Rehm n. n. (Ciboria john- 
sonii). Ann. Mycolog. 4:338. Aug. 1906. 

Sclerotinia nyssaegena (Ellis) Rehm n. n. (Peziza nyssaegena 
Ellis N. A. F.; Ciboria nyssaegena Sacc. Syll.) Ann. 
Mycolog. 4:338. Aug. 1906. 

Sclerotinia on Cauliflower and Cabbage, see Disease of Cauli¬ 
flower. 

Second Supplement to New Genera of Fungi published since the 
year 1900, with citation and the original descriptions. Com¬ 
piled by P. L. Ricker. Jour. Mycol. 12:60-67, 95-102, March 
and May 1906. 

Septoria potentillarum Fuckel, syn. of Marssonina potentillae 
q. v. 

Septoria potentillarum Fckl., syn. of Marssonina potentillarum 
q. v. 

Sexual Reproduction and the Organization of the Nucleus in 
Certain Mildews. R. A. Harper. Carnegie Institution of 
Washington Publication No. 37:1-104. PI. I-VII. Sep¬ 
tember 1905. 


270 


Journal of Mycology 


[Vol. 12 


Sheldon, John L. A Report on the Plant Diseases of the State. 
W. Va. Agr. Exp. Sta. Bull. 96:68-99. 6 PI. Jun. 30, 1905. 

Sheldon, John L. Paranhvses in the Genus Glomerella. Sci¬ 
ence, N. S. 23:851-2. 1 June 1906. 

Sheldon, John L. The Ripe Rot or Mummy Disease of Guavas 
[Gloeosporium psidii G. Del.] W. Va. Agr. Exp. Sta. Bull. 
104:297-315. PI. I-IV. 1 Apr. 1906. 

Shear, C. L. Peridermium cerebrum Peck and Cronartium quer- 
cum (Berk.) [Cultures, Etc.] Jour. Mycol. 12:89-92. May 
1906. 

Shear, C. L. Report of Secretary of American Mycological 
Society, New Orleans Meeting, January 1, 1906. Jour. 
Mycol. 12:85-6. Mar. 1906. 

Slippery Elm, see Ulmus fulva. 

Smith, Ralph E. Asparagus and Asparagus Rust in California. 
Calif. Agr. Exp. Sta. Bull. 165:1-99. Jan. 1905. 

Smith, Ralph E. Further experiments in Asparagus Rust Con¬ 
trol. Calif. Agr. Exp. Sta. Bull. 172:1-21. Jan. 1906. 

Smith, Ralph E. Pear scab [Fusicladium pirinum Lib.] Calif. 
Agr. Exp. Sta. Bull. 163:1-18. Dec. 1904 [issued 1905]. 

Smith, Ralph E. Tomato Diseases in California. Calif. Agr. 
Exp. Sta. Bull. 175:1-16. Jan. 1906. 

Smut, Stinking, of Wheat and Loose Smut of Oats, the Pre¬ 
vention of. Walter T. Swingle. U. S. Dept. Agr. Far¬ 
mers’ Bulletin 250:1-16. 1906. 

Solidago mollis Bartl, host to Puccinia solidaginis-mollis Diet, 
n. sp. Ann. Mycolog. 4:308. Aug. 1906. 

Solidago sp., host to Leptosphaeria perplexa Sacc. et Fairm. n. 
sp. Jour. Mycol. 12:49. March 1906. 

Spaulding, Perley. A Disease of Black Oaks caused by Poly- 
porus obtusus Berk. An. Rep. Mo. Bot. Gar. 16:109-116. 
PI. 13-19. 1905. 

Sphaeropsis lyndonvillae Sacc. n. sp., in ramulis Hibisci syriaci. 
Ann. Mycolog. 4:276. 5 June 1906. 

Sphaeropsis magnoliae Ell. & Dearn. n. sp. on Magnolia (acu¬ 
minata?) No. 2087, Fungi Columbiana. 20 Mar. 1905. 

Sporormia leguminosa Fairman n. sp., on the inner surface of 
pod of Locust, Robinia pseudacacia L. Proc. Rochester 
Acad. Sci. 4:216. March 1906. 

St. Louis Higher Fungi [Glatfelter], see Preliminary List. . 


Nov. 1906] Index to North American Mycology 


271 


Strobus strobus (L.) Small (Pinus strobus L.), host to Perider- 
mium globosum Arth. & Kern n. sp. Bull. Torr. Bot. Club, 
33:424. Aug. 1906. 

Stropharia cubensis Earle n. sp. [Cuba.] Informe An. Estac. 
Agronom. Cuba, 11240. 1 June 1906. 

Stropharia floccosa Earle n. sp. [Cuba.] Informe An. Estac, 
Agronom. Cuba, 11240. 1 June 1906. 

Stuart, Wm. Disease Resistance of Potatoes. Vt. Agr. Exp^ 
Sta. Bull. 122:107-136. Apr. 1906. 

Sumstine, D. R. Note on Wynnea Americana [with descrip¬ 
tion]. Jour. Mycol. 12:59. Mar. 1906. 

Sumstine, D. R. Pleurotus Hollandianus sp. nov. [Description], 
Journal Mycol. 12 :59. Mar. 1906. 

Swingle, Walter T. The Prevention of Stinking Smut of 
Wheat and Loose Smut of Oats. U. S. Dept. Agr. Far¬ 
mers’ Bulletin 250:1-16. 1906. 

Sydow, H. & P. Neue und kritische Uredineen—IV. Ann. 
Mycolog. 4:28-32. Feb. 1906. 

Tecoma radicans, host to Coniothyrium olivaceum tecomae Sacc. 
n. var. Ann. Mycolog. 4:276. 5 June 1906. 

Tecoma radicans, host to Phomopsis majuscula Sacc. n. sp. Ann. 
Mycolog. 4:275. 5 June 1906. 

Teichospora praeclara Rehm n. sp., ad corticem adhuc pendulum 
Ostryae virginicae. Ann. Mycolog. 4:336. Aug. 1906. 

Tilia, old board, host to Amphisphaeria aeruginosa Fairman n... 
sp. Proc. Rochester Acad. Sci. 4:221. March 1906. 

Tomato Disease in California, Ralph E. Smith. Calif. Agr. Exp.. 
Sta. Bull. 175:1-16. Jan. 1906. 

Trichosphaeria interpilosa Fairman n. sp., on rotten wood.. 
Proc. Rochester Acad. Sci. 4:219. March 1906. 

Twight, E. H. and Ash, Charles S. Contribution to the Study 
of Fermentation. Calif. Agr. Exp. Sta. Bull. 159:1-26.. 
June 1904. 

Tylostomeae, illustrated. C. G. Lloyd. Pp. 1-28. PI. 74-85.- 
Feb. 1906. 

Ulmus fulva, dead branches, host to Haplosporella conmixta 
Peck, n. sp. Bull. Torr. Bot. Club, 33:219. Apr. 1906. 

Ulmus (?). bark, host to Amphisphaeria polymorpha Rehm n. 
sp. Proc. Rochester Acad. Sci. 4:222. March 1906. 

Urera, host to Rossellinia bakeri Ellis n. sp. [Nicaragua]. Tor- 
reya 5:87. May 1905. 



272 Journal of Mycology [Vol. 12 

Uromyces amoenus Syd. n. sp., in foliis Gnaphalii (Anaphalis) 
margaritacei. Ann. Mycolog. 4:28. Feb. 1906. 

Uromyces amphidymus Syd. n. sp., in foliis Glyceriae fluitantis. 
Ann. Mycolog. 4:29. Feb. 1906. 

Uromyces fremonti Syd. n. sp., in foliis Oenotherae (Megap- 
terii) fremonti. Ann. Mycolog. 4:29. Feb. 1906. 

Wing-angled Loose strife, see Lythrum alatum. . . 

Uromyces heterodermus Syd. n. sp., in foliis vivis Erythronii 
parviflori. Ann. Mycolog 4:29. Feb. 1906. 

Uromyces substriatus Syd. n. sp., in foliis Lupini argentei. Ann. 
Mycolog. 4:30. Feb. 1906. 

Utahensis, Fungi [exsiccati], see Fungi Utahenses. 

Valsa (Eu-valsa) rhodospora Sacc. n. sp., in corticibus atratis 
ramorum majorum Aceris sp. Ann. Mycolog. 4:275. 5 

June 1906. 

Van Hook, J. M. A cause of Freak Peas [Ascochyta pisi Lib.] 
Torreya, 6:67-9. April, 1906. 

Van Hook, J. M. Ascochyta pisi. A disease of seed Peas. 
Ohio Naturalist, 6:507-512. Apr. 1906. 

Verticillium discicedum Sacc. et Fairm n. sp., in disco Lachneae 
hemisphericae. Jour. Mycol. 12 :50. Mar. 1906. 

Vitis vinifera, host to Micropera ampelina Sacc. et Fairm. n. sp. 
Jour. Mycol. 12:50. Mar. 1906. 

Weissia viridula, host to Epicoccum torquens Massee n. sp. Tor¬ 
reya, 6:49. Mar. 1906. 

Whetzel, H. H. The Blight Canker of Apple Trees [Bacillus 
amylovorus (Burr.) de Toni]. Cornell Univ. Agr. Exp. Sta. 
Bull. 236:99-138. Feb. 1906. 

Wintering of Grain Rusts, see Observations on the. 

Wilcox, E. Mead. Diseases of the Apple, Cherry, Peach, and 
Plum. Ala. Agr. Exp. Sta. Bull. 132:75-142. PI. I-IX. 
Apr. 1905. 

Wisconsin Russulas, see Russulas of Madison and. 

Wood, G. C. Additions to the Lichen Flora of Long Island. 
[List of 18 species.] Bryologist 8:^1. May 1905. 

Wynnea Americana, Note on [with description.] D. R. Sum- 
stine. Jour. Mycol. 12:59. Mar. 1906. 

Xylaria brevipes Sacc. et Fairm. n. sp. ad truncos dejectos. 
Jour. Mycol. 12:48. Mar. 1906. 

Zapote bianco, see Casimiroa edulis. . . 


INDEX TO VOLUME 12. 


.American Mycological Society, New Orleans Meeting January 

I, 1906. (C. L. Shear). 85. 

Anthracnose, A New, of Alfalfa and Red Clover. Samuel M. 

Bain and Samuel H. Essary. 192. 

Arthur, J. C. A New Classification of the Uredinales. 188. 
Arthur, J. C. Cultures of Uredineae in 1905. 11. 

Arthur J. C. Reasons for Desiring a Better Classification of the 
Uredinales. 149. 

Atkinson, Geo. F. A New Species of Entoloma from Central 
Ohio. 237. 

Atkinson, Geo. F. Two New Species Belonging to Naucoria and 
Stropharia. 193. 

Bain, Samuel M. and Essary, Samuel H. A New Anthracnose 
of Alfalfa and Red Clover. 192. 

Bates, J. M. Rust Notes for 1905. 45. 

Bessey, Ernst A. Dilophospora alopecuri. 57. 

Bubak, Fr. Einige neue Pilze aus Nord America. 52. 

Charles, Vera K. Occurrence of Lasiodiplodia on Theobroma 
cacao and Mangifera indica. 145. 

Classification of the Uredinales, Reasons for Desiring a Better. 

J. C. Arthur. 149. 

Cronartium quercuum (Berk.), Peridermium cerebrum Peck and. 
C. L. Shear. 89. 

Culture Experiments (Kellerman), see Uredineae, 9. 

Cultures of Uredineae in 1905. J. C. Arthur. 11. 

Descriptive Synopses of Morgan’s North American Species of 
Marasmius. 159. 

Dilophospora alopecuri. Ernst A. Bessey. 57. 

Einige neue Pilze aus Nord America. Fr. Bubak. 52. 
Entoloma, A new species of, from Central Ohio. Geo. F. Atkin¬ 
son. 237. 

Ellis, Job Bicknell — Obituary. W. A. Kellerman. 41. 

Field Notes on the Uredineae. A. O. Garrett. 162. 

Fungi Selecti Guatemalenses. First decade. W. A. Kellerman. 
238. 

Fungi, Some Wood-staining, from Various Localities in the 
United States. Geo. G. Hedgcock. 204. 

Galera, A New Species of. Charles H. Peck. 148. 

Garrett, A. O. Field Notes on the Uredineae. 162. 

Hedgcock, Geo. G. Some Wood-staining Fungi from Various 
Localities in the United States. 204. 

Hedgcock, Geo. G. and Spaulding, Perley. A New Method of 
Mounting Fungi Grown in Cultures for the Herbarium. 
T 4 7 - 

Heliomyces, North American Species of. A. P. Morgan. 92. 


274 Journal of Mycology [Vol. 12 

Index to North American Mycology. W. A. Kellerman. 67, 
102, 221, 247. 

Kellerman, W. A. A New Plowrightia from Guatemala. 185. 
Kellerman, W. A. Fungi Selecti Guatemalenses, First Decade. 
238. 

Kellerman, W. A. Obituary — Job Bicknell Ellis. 41. 
Kellerman, W. A. Index to North American Mycology. 67, 
102, 221, 247. 

Kellerman, W. A. Notes from Mycological Literature, XVII, 
XVIII, XIX, XX, XXI, 32, 80, 128, 164, 211. 

Kellerman, W. A. Mycological Expedition to Guatemala. 137. 
Kellerman, W. A. Uredineous Culture Experiments with Puc- 
cinia sorghi 1905. 9. 

Lasiodiplodia on Theobroma cacao and Mangifera indica, Occur¬ 
rence of. Vera K. Charles. 145. 

Lepiota, North American Species of. A. P. Morgan. 154, 195, 
242. 

Long, W. PI. Notes on New or Rare Species of Ravenelia. 

2 33 - 

Marasmius, North American Species of. A. P. Morgan. 1. 
Mycromycetes americani Novi. P. A. Saccardo. 47. 

Morgan, A. P. North American Species of Heliomyces. 92. 
Morgan, A. P. North American Species of Lepiota. 154, 195,. 
242. 

Morgan, A. P. North American Species of Merasmius. 1. 
Mounting Fungi Grown in Cultures for the Herbarium, A New 
Method of. Geo. G. Hedgcock and Perley Spaulding. 147. 
Mycological Expedition to Gautemala. W. A. Kellerman. 137. 
Mycological Society, American, New Orleans Meeting, January 
1, 1906. (C. L. Shear). 85. 

Naucoria and Stropharia, Two New Species belonging to, Geo. 
F. Atkinson. 193. 

North American Species of Heliomyces. A. P. Morgan. 92. 
North American Species of Lepioota. A. P. Morgan. 154, 195,. 
242. 

North American Species of Marasmius. 1. 

Note on Wynnea Americana. D. R. Sumstine. 59. 

Notes from Mycological Literature XVII, XVIII, XIX, XX,. 

XXI. W. A. Kellerman. 32, 8, 128, ,164, 211. 

Notes on New or Rare Species of Ravenelia. W. H. Long. 233. 
Neue Pilze, einige, aus Nord America. Fr. Bubak. 52. 

New Anthracnose of Alfalfa and Red Clover. Samuel M. Bain 
and Samuel H. Essary. 192. 

New Classification of Uredinales. J. C. Arthur. 188. 

New Method of Mounting Fungi Grown in Cultures for the 
Herbarium. Geo. G. Hedgcock and Perley Spaulding. 
147. 


Nov. 1906] 


Index to Volume 12 


275 


New Plowrightia from Gautemala. W. A. Kellerman. 185. 

New Species of Entoloma from Central Ohio. Geo. F. Atkinson. 
237 * 

New Species of Galera. Charles H. Peck. 148. 

New Species belonging to Naucoria and Stropharia. Geo. F. 
Atkinson. 193. 

Obituary. Job Bicknell Ellis. W. A. Kellerman. 41. 
Occurrence of Lasiodiplodia on Theobroma cacao and Mangi- 
fera indica. Vera K. Charles. 145. 

Peck, Charles H. A New Species of Galera. 148. 

Peridermium cerebrum Peck and Cronartium quercuum (Berk). 
C. F. Shear. 89. 

Peziza fusicarpa Ger. and Peziza semitosta B. & C. Elias J. 
Durand. 288. 

Pleurotus hollandianus sp. nov. D. R. Sumstine. 59. 
Plowrightia, A New, from Gautemala. W. A. Kellerman. 185. 
Ravenelia, Notes on New or Rare Species of. W. H. Fong. 233. 
Reasons for Desiring a Better Classification of the Uredinales. 
J. C. Arthur. 149. 

Ricker, P. F. Second Supplement to New Genera of Fungi pub¬ 
lished since the year 1900, with citation and the original des¬ 
criptions. 60, 95. 

Rust Notes for 1905. J. M. Bates. 45. 

Saccardo, P. A. Micromycetes Americani Novi. 47. 

Second Supplement to new Genera of Fungi published since the 
year 1900, with citation and the original descriptions. P. 
F. Ricker, 60, 95. 

Shear, C. L. Peridermium cerebrum Peck and Cronartium 
ing, January 1, 1906. 885. 

Shear, C. L. American Mycological Society, New Orleans, 
meeting, January 1, 1906. 885. 

Shear, C. L. Periderminum cerebrum Peck and Cronartium 
quercuum (Berk.) 889. 

Stropharia and Naucoria, Two new species belonging to. Geo. 
F. Atkinson. 193. 

Sumstine, D. R. Pleurotus hollandianus sp. nov. 59. 

Sumstine, D. R. Note on Wynnea americana. 59. 

Synopses of Morgan’s North American Species of Marasmius. 

159 - 

Uredinales, A new classification of the. J. C. Arthur. 188. 
Uredineous Culture Experiments with Puccinia sorghi 1905. W. 
A. Kellerman. 9. 

Uredineae, Cultures of, in 1905. J. C. Arthur. 11. 

Uredineae, Field Notes on the. A. O. Garrett. 162. 
Wood-staining Fungi from various Localities in the United 
States. Geo. G. Hedgcock. 204. 

Wynnea Americana, Note on. D. R. Sumstine. 59. 


276 


Journal of Mycology 


[Vol. 12 


INDEX TO DESCRIBED SPECIES. 


(The new species 

Agaricus clypeolarius Bull., p. 197. 
Agaricus conspurcata Willd., 243. 
Agaricus cristatus Bolton, 243. 
Agaricus epiphyllus Pers., 3. 
Agaricus fuscosquameus Morg., 

246. 

Agaricus graminum Lib., 1. 

Agaricus languidis Lasch., 4. 
Agaricus merulinus Bertero, 8. 
Agaricus metulaesporus B. & B., 

198. 

Agaricus nigripes Schw., 93. 
Agaricus perforans Hoffm., 3. 
Agaricus saccharinus Batsch, 2. 
Amanita as^era Pers., 200. 

Bonanseja, n. gen., 50. 

Bonanseja mexicana Sacc., 51. 

Ceratopodium album Corda, 208. 
Ceratostoma fairmani Sacc., 49. 
Ceratostomella capillifera Hedg., 
^205. 

Ceratostomella schrenkiana Hedg., 

^ 205. 

Ceratostomella echinella E. & E., 

^ 205. 

Ceratostomella exigua Hedg., 206. 
Ceratostomella minor Hedg., 206. 
Ceratostomella moniliformis 
Hedg., 206. 

Ceratostomella pilifera (Fr.) 
Wint., 204. 

Ceratostomella pluriannulata 
^ Hedg., 205. 

Cercospora coleroides Sacc., 52. 
Colletotrichum trifolii Bain, 
193- 

Dilophospora alopecuri (Fr.) Fr., 
57. 

Entoloma subcostatum Atkin¬ 
son, 237. 

Erostella transversa Sacc. et 
Fairm., 48. 

Fusarium roseum Link, 209. 
Fusidium roseum Link, 209. 

Galera kellermani Peck. 148. 
Gloeosporium apiosporium 
^ Sacc., 51. 

Graphium album (Corda) Sacc., 

. 208. . 

Graphium ambrosiigerum Hedg., 

^ 209 - . 

Graphium atrovirens Hedg., 207. 
Graphium aureum Hedg., 208. 
Graphium eumorphum Sacc., 207. 
Graphium rigidum (Pers.) Sacc., 
208. 


are in black type.) 

Graphium smaragdinum (H. & 
S.) Sacc., 207. 

Haplosporella missoariensis Bu- 
bak, 54. 

Heliomyces Lev., 92. 

Lleliomyces bertoroi Lev., 93. 
Heliomyces decolorans B. & C., 
93. 

Heliomyoes foetens Pat., 93. 
Heliomyces nigripes Morgan, 93. 
Heliomyces plumierii Lev., 93. 
Heliomyces vialis Morgan, 94. 

Helminthosporium orthospomm 
Sacc. et Fairm., 50. 
Hendersonia mexicana Sacc., 51. 

Hormiscium gelatinosum Hedg., 

210 . 

Hormodendron cladosporioides 
(Fr.) Sacc.. 209. 

Hormodendron p-riseum Hedg., 
209. 

Hypoxylon pumilio Sacc. et 
Fairm., 47. 

Lachnea fusicarpa (Ger.) Sacc., 
29. 

Lachnea hainesii (Ell.) Sacc., 31. 
Lepiota Persoon, 155. 

Lepiota acerina Peck, 201. 

Lepiota adnatifolia Peck, 195. 
Lepiota alluviina Peck, 243. 
Lepiota amianthina Scop., 195. 
Lepiota angustana Britzl., 244. 
Lepiota aspera Pers., 200. 

Lepiota arenicola Peck, 243. 
Lepiota asprata Berk., 200. 

Lepiota asperula Atks., 201. 
Lepiota brunnescens Peck, 274. 
Lepiota caerulescens Peck, 245. 
Lepiota Candida Morgan, 202. 
Lepiota carcharias Pers., 199. 
Lepiota cheimonoceps B. & C., 
157. 

Lepiota clypeolaria (Bull.) Peck, 
197. 

Lepiota conspurcata Willd., 243. 
Lepiota cristatella Peck, 156. 
Lepiota cultorum B. & C., 196. 
Lepiota cyanozonata Longyear, 
157. 

Lepiota delicata Fr., 202. 

Lepiota echinodermata Cke. & 
Mass., 200. 

Lepiota ecitodora Atks., 158. 
Lepiota eriophora Peck, 201. 
Lepiota erythrella Speg., 245. 






Nov. 1906] 


Index to Volume 12 


277 


Lepiota erythrella virescens Speg., 

245. 

Lepiota felina Pers., 199. 

Lepiota felinoides Peck, 247. 
Lepiota floralis B. & Rav., 198. 
Lepiota fulvaster B. o 1 C., 244. 
Lepiota fulvodisca Peck, 203. 
Lepiota fuscosquamea Peck., 201. 
Lepiota gemmata Morgan, 202. 
Lepiota glatfelteri Peck, 248. 
Lepiota glisschra Morgan, 203. 
Lepiota gracilis Peck, 199. 

Lepiota granosa Morgan, 196. 
Lepiota granulosa Batsch., 196. 
Lepiota hemisclera B. & C., 200. 
Lepiota illinita Fr., 203. 

Lepiota incarnata Clements, 245. 
Lepiota mesomornha Bull., 156. 
Lepiota metulispora B. & Br., 198. 
Lepiota miamensis Morgan, 242. 
Lepiota mutata Peck, 243. 

Lepiota neophana Morgan, 248. 
Lepiota noscitata Britzlm., 157. 
Lepiota oblita Peck, 203. 

Lepiota parvanulata Lasch., 157. 
Lepiota phaeosticta Morgan, 
248. 

Lepiota pulveracea Peck, 158. 
Lepiota purpureoconica Atks., 158. 
Lepiota pusillomyces Peck, 158. 
Lepiota repanda (Clements) Mor¬ 
gan, 197. 

Lepiota rubrotincta Peck, 245. 

Lepiota rufescens Morgan, 246. 
Lepiota rufipes Morgan, 156. 

Lepiota rugoso-reu'culata Lor., 
195. 

Lepiota seminuda Lasch., 157. 
Lepiota sordescens B. & C., 247. 

Lepiota spanista Morgan, 198. 

Lepiota subclypeolaria B. & C., 

246. 

Lepiota subliliacea Peck, 198. 

Lepiota umbrosa Morgan, igg. 
Lepiota virescens Speg., 245. 
Leptosphaeria perplexa Sacc. et 
Fairm., 49. 

Leptospora sparsa Sacc. et 
Fairm., 49. 

Leptothyrium californicum Bu- 
bak, 55. 

Leptothyrium kellermanni Bu- 
bak, 55. 

Leptothyrium pazschkeanum 
Bubak, 55. 

Macropodia fusicarpa (Ger.) 
Dur., 29. 

Macropodia pubida (B. & C.) 
Sacc., 29. 


Macropodia semitosta (B. & C.) 
Sacc., 31. 

Marasmius aculeatus Pat., 6. 
Marasmius albiceps Peck, 5. 
Marasmius albo-fuscus B. & C., 5. 
Marasmius arachnoideus B. & C., 
8 . 

Marasmius asperifolius Pat., 8. 
Marasmius atro-rubens Berk., 2. 
Marasmius caespitosus Peck, 7. 
Marasmius calosporus Pat., 8. 
Marasmius chrysochaetes B. & C.> 
1. 

Marasmius clavaeformis Berk., 6. 
Marasmius concolor B. & C., 7. 
Marasmius coracipes B. & C., 7. 
Marasmius curreyi B. & Br., 1. 
Marasmius curtisii Sacc. et Syd., 
7. 

Marasmius cyathiformis B. & C.,, 

4. 

Marasmius decurrens Peck, 6. 
Marasmius epiphyllus Fr., 3. 
Marasmius felix Morgan, 2. 
Marasmius graminum B. & Br., 1. 
Marasmius haematoides B. & C., 
7. 

Marasmius hawaiensis P. Hen., 8. 
Marasmius hyperellus Fr., 4. 
Marasmius insitius Fr., 2. 
Marasmius languidis Fr., 4. 
Marasmius leucocephalus Mont., 

5. 

Marasmius merulinus B. & C., 8. 
Marasmius minutissimus Peck, 3. 
Marasmius nidulus B. & C., 8. 
Marasmius nigripes Fr., 93. 
Marasmius obliquus B. & C., 7. 
Marasmius perforans Fr., 3. 
Marasmius purourascens B. & C., 
4. 

Marasmius purpureus B. & C., 6. 
Marasmius sabali Berk., 8. 
Marasmius saccharinus Fr., 2. 
Marasmius semisparsus Berk., 5. 
Marasmius thujinus Peck, 2. 
Marasmius semiustis B. & C., 7. 
Marasmius tomentosipes Peck, 5. 
Marasmius vaillantii Fr., 3. 
Marasmius vialis Peck., 94. 
Marasmius viridi-fuscus B. & C., 
4. 

Mastocephalus carneo-annulatus 
Clements, 245. 

Mastocephalus incarnatus, 245. 
Mastocephalus repandus Clem¬ 
ents, 197. 

Micropora ameplina .Sacc. et 
Fairm., 49. 







278 


Journal of Mycology 


Naucoria paludosella Atkinson, 
193 - 

Otthiella fairmani Sacc., 48. 

Penicillium aurem Corda, 210. 

Penicillium cladosporioides Fr., 
209. 

Peziza fusicarpa Ger. 29. 

Peziza hainesii Ell., 31. 

Peziza morgani Mass., 29. 

Peziza pubida B. & C., 29. 

Peziza semitosta (B. & C.) Sacc., 
81. 

Peziza velutina B. & C. (ined.), 
29. 

Phleospora hanseni Bubak., 54. 

Phoma lophanthi Bubak., 53. 

Phomopsis missouriensis Bu¬ 
bak, 53. 

Phyllosticta consors Sacc., 51. 

Phyllosticta convexula Bubak, 
52. 

Pleurotus hollandianus Sum- 
stine., 59. 


[Vol. 12 

Plowrightia williamsoniana Kel- 
lerm., 186. 

Pseudostegia n. gen., 56. 

Pseudostegia nubilosa Bubak, 
56 . 

Puccinia ptilosiae Bubak, 52. 

Ravenelia arthuri Long, 234. 

Ravenelia piscidiae Long, 234. 

Rhabdospora demetriana Bu¬ 
bak, 54. 

Roseilina elaeospora Sacc. et 
Fairm., 48. 

Saitomyces Ricker n. n., 61. 

Saitomyces japonicus (Saito) 
Ricker, 61. 

Sarcoscypha pubida B. & C., 29. 

Sarcoscypha semitosta B. & C., 31. 

Stropharia hardii Atkinson, 194. 

Verticillium discisedum Sacc. et 
Fairm., 50. 

Wynnea americana Thax., 59. 

Xylaria brevipes Sacc. et 
Fairm., 47. 


INDEX TO HOSTS. 


Agave americana. p. 187. 
Aguacate. 51. 

Anona cherimolia. 51. 
Arctostaphylus tomentosa. 51. 
Asclepias verticillata. 53, 55. 
Betula, cortex. 48. 

Carya tomentosa. 53. 

Carex sp. 56. 

Casimiroa edulis. 52. 

Elm, sapwood. 209. 

Fagus atropunicea, wood. 205, 
209. 

Gum, sapwood. 209. 

Lachnea hemispherica. 50. 
Liquidambar styraciflua L. 205, 
207, 208, 210. 

Lophanthus nepetoides. 53. 
Madrona de arbol. 51. 

Morus alba. 51. 

Medicago sativa. 193. 

Oak, sapwood. 209. 


Persea gratissima. 51. 

Persica vulgaris. 54. 

Pine, sapwood. 209. 

Pinus arizonica, wood. 206. 

Pinus echinata, wood. 205. 

Pinus ponderosa, wood. 204. 
Pinus strobus, wood. 208, 209, 
210 . 

Pinus viriginiana, wood. 206. 
Piscidia erythrina. 234. 

Ptilosia lactucina. 52. 

Quercus morehus. 55. 

Quercus rubra, wood. 206, 208. 
Rubus strigosus, wood. 207. 
Sassafras officinalis. 55. 

Solidago, dead stems. 49. 

Species indet. 234. 

Trifolium pratensis. 193. 

Vitis vinifera. 50. 

Zapote bianco. 52. 







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